logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Fault-Lines
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-07-01 13:14
"Fault Lines" by Doug Johnstone - DNF - abandoned at 65% because I didn't care what happened to the main character
Fault Lines - Doug Johnstone

The publisher's summary is:

"In a reimagined contemporary Edinburgh, in which a tectonic fault has opened up to produce a new volcano in the Firth of Forth, and where tremors are an everyday occurrence, volcanologist Surtsey makes a shocking discovery. On a clandestine trip to The Inch—the new volcanic island—to meet Tom, her lover and her boss, she finds his lifeless body, and makes the fatal decision to keep their affair, and her discovery of his corpse secret. Desperate to know how he died, but also terrified she'll be exposed, Surtsey's life quickly spirals into a nightmare when someone makes contact—someone who claims to know what she's done."

 

This led me to imagine I'd be reading a tense thriller in which a brave young vulcanologist in training would be stalked by an evil killer, with the probable involvement of a live volcano.

 

It's not that kind of book. In many ways, it's much better. Most of the “fault lines” are emotional rather than geophysical. It’s introspective, personal and deeply emotional.

 

Way back in Chapter One, when I was still living off the publisher's branding rather than the author's text, I found the novel hard to connect to. There I was, at the beginning of a promising thriller which opened with our heroine being where she shouldn't be, discovering a dead body and running away unseen.

 

Hours later, in the middle of the night our, by now high on grass, heroine receives a text on a phone only she is supposed to know exists and which she retrieved from the dead body.

 

It's a moment of high drama. I should be tense. But the text message takes my badly wired head to the wrong place. The message reads:

 

"I know you were there".

 

And my mind, without hesitation, provided the reply she would make if she were a sassy American Urban Fantasy heroine rather than a Scottish vulcanologist:

 

"But do you know what I did last summer?"

 

Sadly, the heroine's response was "Who is this?" and I was unable to continue with the novel until I'd given the voices in my head time to settle down and pretend to be grown-ups.

 

The chapters that followed didn't pull me into some kind of Clarice Starling versus Hannibal Lecter cat and mouse thing. Instead I learned more about our heroine Surtsey: her relationship with her mother, who is in a hospice dying of cancer in her forties, with her sister who is losing herself in casual sex and alcohol and only really comes alive while serving behind a bar, with her he's-cute-and-convenient classmate/lover and with her she-always-has-great-grass roommate.
 
It was well written, especially the relationship with the dying mother and with the if-I-ignore-it-it-isn't-really-happening sister. The love, grief, shame, anger and helplessness were delivered with an authentic emotional punch.
 
That's what carried me to the 65% mark in the book.
 
I abandoned it after another of Surtsey's paranoid, anger and fear-driven violent outbursts.
 
I realised I don't really care what happens to this woman. I feel sorry for the pain the deaths of those she loves is causing her but to me, she seems selfish, irresponsible, angry and violent. She uses the people around her to meet her needs without really connecting with them and she hides from her emotions and the consequences of her actions by staying drunk or high or both.
 
It's nicely drawn but it doesn't make me root for her.
 
I'll read more of Doug Johnstone's work, but this one isn't for me.

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-06-30 22:11
Reading progress update: I've read 57%.
Fault Lines - Doug Johnstone

This isn’t the techno disaster thriller I thought it would be. Most of the “fault lines” are emotional rather than geophysical. It’s introspective and personal.

 

Now if only I liked the main character, I’d be making happy rapid progress.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-06-25 18:50
Reading progress update: I've read 9%.- so maybe I've been reading too many sassy heroines but...
Fault Lines - Doug Johnstone

 So, here I am, at the beginning of a promising thriller which opens with our heroine being where she shouldn't, discovering a dead body and running away unseen.

 

Hours later, in the middle of the night our, by now high, heroine receives a text on a phone only she is supposed to know exists and which she retrieved from the dead body.

 

It's a moment of high drama. I should be tense. But the text message takes my badly wired head to the wrong place.

 

The message reads:

 

"I know you were there".

 

And my mind, without hesitation, provides the reply she would make if she were a sassy American Urban Fantasy heroine rather than a Scottish vulcanologist:

 

"But do you know what I did last summer?"

 

Sadly, the heroine's response was "Who is this?" and I was unable to continue with the novel until I'd given the voices in my head time to settle down and pretend to be grown-ups.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-05-12 03:11
I'm still feeling the promise of the series, but want more.
Fault Lines - Marie Brennan

So straight out of the gate, this makes me happy: there's a "previously on" section -- which is great, and something we need to see more of) -- and a Dramatis Personae (with a cast this big, a major plus).

 

The question is, can episode 2 build on the goodwill that the ending of 1 caused?

 

Ehhh...sorta? We get to know the island this takes place on a little better, the culture there -- and some more about the nations represented (and those representing them). There's some revealing interaction with Kris and Michiko, and it's clear that's where our focus should be. but I sorta want more time with Ojo than with them. That's more about Ojo being interesting than the other two annoying me by their actions at the end of the episode. But not much.

 

For a fantasy world, I like the strange governmental structure -- a mix of diplomacy and single combat -- that they've developed for this series. In reality, ugh. But this is fantasy. so sure, why not? But I'm not sure that I'm buying it. There's a seeming lack of advisors for these diplomats, which is hard to swallow (though narratively neater), especially with Michiko and Kris there's a naiveté that screams that these people shouldn't be left to their own devices. They're like college students out on their own. Yeah, they might be capable, but they need some more wisdom. Letting an entire people's futures to be determined by what a young, untried warrior (no matter how talented) who's easily swayed by elders and friendliness is . . . suggestive of problems.

 

I think I like this series, but I'm not sure. Goodwill toward a couple of the authors will carry you for a bit, I'm just not sure how long it'll last without the series doing a better job of entertaining me. I'm not saying it's bad, I'm just not totally sold. This many pages in, I should be. I want to be -- but I don't think I am yet. I still assume it's coming.

Source: irresponsiblereader.com/2018/05/10/born-to-the-blade-1-2-fault-lines-by-marie-brennan-im-still-feeling-the-promise-of-the-series-but-want-more
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-04-30 08:05
Fault Lines
Fault Lines - Marie Brennan

I really liked this episode, I wasn't too sure after Arrivals, but with Fault Lines it is decided: I want to read this serial. A lot of political conflicts and interesting characters. The world also got more fleshed out.

Looking forward to the rest!

Thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for providing me with a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review!

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?