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review 2018-10-13 23:50
All Summer Long by Susan Mallery
Terve pikk suvi (Fool's Gold, #9) - Susan Mallery,Raili Puskar

Actually, I was kind of hoping it to be a boring story, so I could stop reading the series. It wasn't. Although All Summer Long was an easy read, it was unbelievably good.
I enjoyed the storyline. The main characters, Charlie and Clay, were smart, independent, and interesting. The book had enough romance, family drama, and also some wonderfully hilarious moments. The ending was very similar to all the other endings in this series, but I didn't care. Charlie and Clay were amazing. I fell in love with this couple. I wanted them to have their happily ever after.
Now I just have to read the next story and hope it is as good as this one. :) 
I also think Fool's Gold would be a great TV series.

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review 2018-10-02 08:53
The Golden Ratio by Gary B. Meisner, Rafael Araujo
The Golden Ratio: The Divine Beauty of Mathematics - Gary Meisner,Rafael Araujo

TITLE:  The Golden Ratio:  The Divine Beauty of Mathematics

 

AUTHOR:  Gary B. Meisner, Rafael Araujo (illustrator)

 

PUBLICATION DATE:  23 October 2018

 

FORMAT:  ARC PDF

 

ISBN-13:  9781631064869

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NOTE: I received a copy of this book from NetGalley. This review is my honest opinion of the book.

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DESCRIPTION:

The Golden Ratio examines the presence of this divine number in art and architecture throughout history, as well as its ubiquity among plants, animals, and even the cosmos. This gorgeous book features clear, entertaining, and enlightening commentary alongside stunning full-color illustrations by Venezuelan artist and architect Rafael Araujo.

 

From the pyramids of Giza, to quasicrystals, to the proportions of the human face, the golden ratio has an infinite capacity to generate shapes with exquisite properties. 

 

With its lush format and layflat dimensions that closely approximate the golden ratio, this is the ultimate coffee table book for math enthusiasts, architects, designers, and fans of sacred geometry."

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The Golden Ration by Gary Meisner is an exquisitely illustration, beautifully and clearly written introductory book about the Golden Ratio and related subjects.  There are lovely full-colour illustrations and photographs on nearly every page.  The book begins with the unique properties of the golden ratio and then continues on to its appearance in art and design, architecture (pyramids, cathedrals, musical instruments), nature (leaf and petal arrangements, fractals, spirals, facial proportions, buckyballs, quantum physics, golden DNA, the nautilus controversy), and many other interesting mathematical goodies such as tessellations, platonic solids, the Fibonacci sequence, Pascal’s Triangles etc.  The book also includes appendices that deal with critical thinking, notes and further reading, and “Golden Constructions”.  There are a number of equations and geometrical illustrations, but nothing particularly complicated.  In the author’s own words:  “not everything is based on the golden ratio, but the number of places in which it seems to appear is truly amazing and we are sure to uncover it more and more as technology advances and out knowledge of the physical universe expands”. 

 

This is definately a book I will be adding to my library.

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text 2018-09-07 10:06
Reading progress update: I've read 109 out of 454 pages.
The Raven Boys - Maggie Stiefvater

Third read of this wonderful book. This time I'm listening to it in audio then marking the pages in my paperback. (Reading and listening) and it may be one I've the best audio books I've ever heard. It's really atmospheric and the narration is amazing. The Southern accents are awesome.

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text 2018-05-11 00:02
Reading progress update: I've read 99%.
Howards End - E.M. Forster

“Meg, is or isn't he ill? I can't make out.”

“Not ill. Eternally tired. He has worked very hard all his life, and noticed nothing. Those are the people who collapse when they do notice a thing.”

 

Finally, Henry is close to making a connection.

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text 2018-05-10 23:08
Reading progress update: I've read 83%.
Howards End - E.M. Forster

Henry began to grow serious. Ill-health was to him something perfectly definite. Generally well himself, he could not realize that we sink to it by slow gradations. The sick had no rights; they were outside the pale; one could lie to them remorselessly. When his first wife was seized, he had promised to take her down into Hertfordshire, but meanwhile arranged with a nursing-home instead. Helen, too, was ill. And the plan that he sketched out for her capture, clever and well-meaning as it was, drew its ethics from the wolf-pack.

Henry Wilcox could give Everard Wemyss (see here and here) a run for his money, and because we know that Wemyss was based on a real person (von Arnim's husband and also Bertrand Russel's older brother) we also know that these people existed. And scarier still, they still exist.

 

Why Meg? WHY?!?!?

 

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