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review 2018-04-13 16:21
Looking for death in all the right places
From Here to Eternity: Traveling the World to Find the Good Death - Caitlin Doughty

Here I am talking about death again. Part of me worries that 'harping' on about this subject and these books will turn away the average reader to my blog but the larger part of me (and the one who runs things) believes that if I am going to be authentic with my reviews then I have to follow my mood with what books I voluntarily choose to read. That being said, I'm here to talk about Caitlin Doughty's second book From Here to Eternity: Traveling the World to Find the Good Death. As the title suggests, this is a bit more of a travelogue piece about the death industry. This book explores in depth the way that death is viewed, celebrated, and treated in different countries and cultures. [A/N: I don't know that it needs to be necessarily spelled out but just in case: This book is not for those who shy away from talk of decomposition and graphic depictions of death in general.] Caitlin visits places both far-flung and just around the riverbend all in search of what she terms the Good Death. (For more info visit her website to see if you'd like to join her group.)  She attended an open air cremation where the body is laid atop a pyre and the ceremony is experienced by all members of the community (Colorado). In Japan the families are brought in after the body has been cremated so that they can extricate the bones by chopstick to place them in an urn for safekeeping. She experienced Fiesta de las Ñatitas in La Paz and spoke to those who celebrate these saints by collecting and displaying shrunken skulls (and in some cases mummified heads). One of my favorite places that she described was the Corpse Hotel in Japan where you can visit your deceased family member in the comfort and splendor of an upscale hotel. Overall, From Here to Eternity is a fascinating look at the way that death is addressed by various cultures around the world. It serves as a sobering reminder that death is not accepted but rather feared here in America. If you are interested in the ways that others approach death and how they treat their dead (some cultures revisit the dead to clean and redress them as a sign of honor and remembrance) then I urge you to read this book. 9/10

 

P.S. I'm not done with books on this subject. Keep an eye out for at least 1 possibly 2 more in the not too distant future.

 

What's Up Next: How to Love the Empty Air by Cristin O'Keefe Aptowicz

 

What I'm Currently Reading: The American Way of Death Revisited by Jessica Mitford

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
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review 2018-03-26 19:27
I've heard of misplacing car keys but losing a head is just plain careless
Rest in Pieces: The Curious Fates of Famous Corpses - Bess Lovejoy

Yes, I'm somewhat fascinated by death culture. No, I don't think it's unhealthy. Yes, I do recognize it makes many people uncomfortable especially when walking around with a book somewhat shaped like a coffin with the title Rest in Pieces emblazoned across the front. (It might have been unwise to read this on an airplane but I'm a risk taker.) The subtitle of Bess Lovejoy's book is a dead (ha!) giveaway as to the substance of what lies within (on a roll here!). This book is full of fascinating histories of what became of famous people's corpses. She covers everyone from Presidents and political leaders to outlaws, radicals, and artists. No matter their designation, the dead were rarely left to rest peacefully and with all of their pieces together. There was a lot of ground to cover and I honestly felt like I learned quite a bit (I'm going to be a hit at my next dinner party if I ever get invited to another one). If you have a strong stomach, an interest in the unconventional, and some time on your hands then this is one you definitely shouldn't pass up. 10/10

 

Inside art from the illustrator Mark Stutzman

 

What's Up Next: I've Got This Round: More Tales of Debauchery by Mamrie Hart

 

What I'm Currently Reading: Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
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review 2018-03-10 01:33
I swear I'm okay
Smoke Gets in Your Eyes: And Other Lessons from the Crematory - Caitlin Doughty

I've been thinking about death a lot. And not in an existential way or in a 'oh man she needs professional help' kinda way. I've been thinking about the culture of death and how I'd like my own death to be handled. To that end, I chose a few titles which I'm convinced has skewed the way my co-workers view me. (lol but really) The first is Smoke Gets in Your Eyes: And Other Lessons from the Crematory by Caitlin Doughty. (I'll be discussing her second book at a later date.) This is the autobiographical story of how Caitlin came to work in a crematory and the path that it led her down to discover the 'good death'. It's an exceptionally frank discussion of death but more specifically death culture (or lack thereof) in the United States. Here in America it's a taboo subject. Many people choose to remain ignorant of the reality of death because of a fear of their own (and their loved one's) mortality. Caitlin talks about the current death practices of burial, embalming, cremation, green burials (many different kinds), and donation to science. It reminded me that I should really draw up a will with the specifics of what I want and then discuss it with those who will most likely be honoring my wishes. (And you'd better do what I say or I'll haunt you! hahaha but really)

 

The truth is we are all going to die one day. Wouldn't it be better to see this as natural and be prepared for it? Having open discussions with those who will be charged with taking care of you after you have died makes the process less fraught with uncertainties and fear. Centuries ago, death was embraced because it was necessary to confront it head-on. There were no mortuaries like we know them today. The family was the one who cleaned, wrapped, and sometimes buried the bodies. The grieving process wasn't rushed but was allowed to progress naturally. (Think about the last funeral you attended and how the viewing was timed. Nowadays, you have to leave the cemetery before the casket is even lowered into the earth. Everything is orchestrated and sterile.) I don't think it's morbid to plan ahead and to try to make it as simple and straightforward as possible so that in the end it's about the life that I led and not the stress and confusion of what to do with me once I'm dead. 8/10

 

Something I made a few years ago about a similar book.

 

What's Up Next: The Portable Nineteenth-Century African American Women Writers edited by Hollis Robbins and Henry Louis Gates

 

What I'm Currently Reading: Fly on the Wall: How One Girl Saw Everything by E. Lockhart

 

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
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review 2016-10-28 03:55
Stalking Jack The Ripper - Book 1...
Stalking Jack the Ripper - Kerri Maniscalco,Hachette Audio,James Patterson,Nicola Barber

 "Seventeen-year-old Audrey Rose Wadsworth was born a lord's daughter, with a life of wealth and privilege stretched out before her. But between the social teas and silk dress fittings, she leads a forbidden secret life."

 

"Against her stern father's wishes and society's expectations, Audrey often slips away to her uncle's laboratory to study the gruesome practice of forensic medicine. When her work on a string of savagely killed corpses drags Audrey into the investigation of a serial murderer, her search for answers brings her close to her own sheltered world."

 

"The story's shocking twists and turns, augmented with real, sinister period photos, will make this dazzling debut from author Kerri Maniscalco impossible to forget."

 

When I saw this was published by James Patterson's new imprint and his name was on the front cover, as usual, my first thought was- oh no, really! I know, I know- he didn't write it, lol, and I shouldn't judge but I still wondered what the hell I was getting myself into. I'm almost embarrassed to say though, I honestly loved it and thought it was fantastic! : )

 

I especially liked the story's foray into forensic medicine, although it was a little gruesome, but I didn't think it was too bad. I listened to the audio version though and missed out on all of the graphic pictures and detailed footnotes that I heard were included. The narrator was really good but I would still like to see the book at some point. If you have a weak constitution though, the audio route might be the way to go.

 

I also absolutely loved the main characters, Audrey Rose and Thomas Creswell. Audrey's strong willed and determined to study forensic medicine no matter what the cost. She wears what she wants to and does what she wants to do- screw the rules of society and she stands up to her father and anyone else in her way. She's my kind of girl!

 

Thomas is also studying forensic medicine. Him and Audrey end up as partners in detection as well as falling for each other. He's smart, sarcastic and so very blunt -it's hilarious! He comes across sometimes as cold and harsh but I loved his personality.  The dialogue between the two was absolutely priceless. I really hope to see more of both him and Audrey. I'm definitely going to keep my eye out for the sequel.

 

I read this for my 2016 Halloween Bingo: ~Scary Women (Authors)~ square

 

Scary Women Authors

 

 

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review 2015-12-02 19:24
Review: Speaking in Bones by Kathy Reichs
Speaking in Bones: A Novel (Temperance Brennan) - Kathy Reichs

I am a huge fan of Temperance Brennan and Kathy Reichs, so I am always eager for the next book, Speaking in Bones. How Kathy Reichs is able to come up with a fresh case of crime is always a pleasure for me to read about.

This time, we have some help, or do we?

Websleuths – amateurs compete online to solve cold cases.

Hazel (Lucky) Strike, one of the websleuths thinks she knows who the unidentified body is and calls Temperance to tell her. She thinks it is a woman by the name of Cora Teague. Little did Hazel realize, she should have kept a low profile.

Ryan and Temperance make a fantastic team, but are plagued with personal problems. He had walked away, but was back, proposing marriage. What answer will Temperance give him?

Temperance’s mother is alone, fighting cancer and loves a mystery. She’s an insomniac and deft at searching the internet. I love this strong and determined character. She does not dwell on the bad, but continues living. She discovers something and places a call to Temperance, early in the morning, jolting her into work mode.

The explanations for some of the technical aspects make it easy to follow along. Even if I don’t understand everything, I don’t feel it hurts the story in any way.

Speaking in Bones is another great mystery and I love following along with Temperance as she discovers the answers. Her relationship with Ryan keeps me wondering…when will they finally get together. I have always believed they would. They are perfect for each other..yin and yang.

Imagine never knowing where your loved one is, just gone. Thank goodness Temperance never gives up until she has the answers.

So much is going on that I struggle to predetermine the outcome. Not knowing what the ending will be keeps me waiting for her next book, her next unknown study in the evil that men/women do.

I received of copy of Speaking in Bones by Kathy Reichs in return for an honest review.

To see more visit http://www.funinmental.com

Source: www.fundinmental.com/review-speaking-in-bones-by-kathy-reichs
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