logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Get-a-Clue
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-03-06 15:42
Kill Your Darlings: Clue or Red Herring?

YELLOW GAME ONLY

 

Inspector Reader receives a letter from Sherlock Holmes on a topic of concern to his investigation.

 

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-03-06 15:40
Kill Your Darling: Clue or Red Herring?

RED GAME ONLY

 

The image of the front and back of a business card found tucked into the door frame of Mrs. Oliver's flat by Hercule Poirot's very efficient secretary, Miss Lemon, when she arrived there for a prearranged tea party on Monday afternoon.

 

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-03-06 15:40
Kill Your Darlings: Clue or Red Herring?

GREEN GAME ONLY

 

Inspector Reader receives a letter of concern to the investigation from Mrs. Elizabeth Darcy, while he is in Derbyshire investigating a missing person's report.

 

Like Reblog Comment
review 2018-02-27 04:55
Who is Sam Westing?
The Westing Game - Ellen Raskin

The book begins with sixteen people gathering for the reading of millionaire Sam Westing's will. His will is structured like a puzzle and the sixteen people must find a solution in order to win the fortune. The Westing Game is different than other mysteries because the investigators are the suspects of Westing's "murder". While reading the book, the students will have a detective notebook and must use character analysis, inferencing, and questioning to solve the mystery. This activity will keep the students engaged instead of traditional comprehension questions. 

 

Reading Level: Lexile 750L

 

Grades: 5-7th 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-02-24 16:50
The Clue by Carolyn Wells
The Clue - Carolyn Wells

This is a rare classic mystery that I just really didn't enjoy at all, even taking into consideration the differences in the way that classic mysteries are plotted/presented. It took me nearly a month to finish this slender, 225 page book, which probably tells you everything you need to know.

 

The writing was stiff and the characters were universally wafer thin. It purports to be an entry in the "Fleming Stone" series, but the great detective himself isn't even mentioned until the 87% mark, and he essentially swans into the story at around 90%, receives all of the information from the individuals who have collected it, pronounces a rather preposterous solution and it's a wrap.

 

The representation of female characters is absolutely terrible - even worse than is often the case in books published during early twentieth century (this book was published in 1909). Each woman had some assigned trait from which she was forbidden to stray: the victim was majestic and haughty; Kitty, the apparent love interest, was bewitching and clever; there was a genuine French maid, who was stormy and dramatic; and Dorothy was the clinging rosebud (whatever the hell that is), timid and appealing.

 

I am willing to concede that, perhaps, every book written by Carolyn Wells wasn't as awful as this one. I'm not entirely certain, however, that I'm prepared to read any more so as to find out.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?