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text 2018-06-04 01:03
Vote for Smokescreen

My thriller, Smokescreen, is No 67 on Goodreads' Palestine-Israel Listopia.

If you've read the novel and you have a Goodreads account, I'd appreciate a vote. Each vote brings more awareness to the book. Thank you.

 

KTIsrael_Palestine Conflict Goodreads' Books

 

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review SPOILER ALERT! 2018-04-25 01:59
Goodreads, some booktubers and Common sense media don't want you to know of the sex and language
A Court of Thorns and Roses - Sarah J. Maas

At the moment of posting this my goodreads review for A COURT OF THORNS AND ROSES  has 131 likes so it should appear on the second page of that site. That isn't the case and I wonder one more time for the reasons goodreads employees are trying to cover up the information and reviews that can help readers make informed decisions. My Tower of dawn review by this same author rhas been supressed from the first page of reviews even though it currently has 265 likes.

I also want to point out that this book portrays abusive relationships (Feyre and her older sisters, Feyre and her two love interests)and torture by one of the love interests. That isn't a reason for not reading the book, it's just something you should know as many booktubers and reviewers aren't commenting on these kind of problematic content. If that doesn't bother you I highly recommend this series. Please don't take my word for it, do your own research.

 

Here are the links to the reviews that were censored by goodreads team

 

https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1272748928
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/31450852

 

 

My review will contain spoilers.

 

descriptionUPDATE APRIL 12TH ADDING PARENTAL GUIDANCE AND SAFETY WARNINGS because kirkus reviews, some GR librarians and most booktubers won't tell you the truth. This is a New adult book not as close to erotica as ACOMAF but still. I'm also changing my original 5 rating to a 3.5 rating


PARENTAL GUIDANCE
SEX/NUDITY 8 out 10 Descriptive make outs. Heroine is sleeping with a villager at the beginning of the book but it's not a graphic scene, some nudity descriptions, a graphic sex scene,including oral, between Tamlin and Feyre . Ritual sex is mentioned as part of a ceremony called Calanmai 


VIOLENCE/GORE 7 out of 10  descriptions of torture to heroine, some of it by one of the love interests (Rhysand), a villager is burned alive during days because the villains mistook her for the heroine. The elder sisters of the heroine are emotionally abusive and unhelpful, they reap the benefits of heroine's sacrifices for themselves without lifting a finger. 

PROFANITY 5/10 some curse words, some sexual references

SUBSTANCE USE 6/10 as every single character in this book is 19 or older or a milleneal ancient fae alcohol consumption is present. Mostly at meals and during a ceremony called Calanmai


SAFETY WARNINGS, possible spoilers for the rest of the series

In this series we have two heroes: Tamlin is the love interest in book 1 and he has sex with another woman after meeting the heroine because it's part of a certain FAE ceremony that keeps fae strong. They aren't together yet so it's not exactly cheating but that's the reason I didn't connect with Tamlin. Well the OW sex and the whole begging- on-his- knees- to- a -rival- for- the -heroine's -safety. That was just stupid. 

In book 2 the love interest switches, Rhysand who appears as the villain in book 1 becomes love interest and Tamlin becomes a jerk, no one roots for Tamlin after chapter 4 because he acts stupidly. But we get a very graphic sex scene of heroine and Tamlin together at the beginning of A COURT OF MIST AND FURY. As someone who is team rhysand I didn't enjoy that sex scene. I got very happy with the rest of the book because Tamlin dissapears and later there's a lot of sex with Rhysand, but yeah, this is an unsafe read. 


So my original rating changes to 3.5 I can't rate lower in spite of the safety issues because book 2 is one of my all time favourites.

Source: www.goodreads.com/review/show/1272748928
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review 2018-04-23 01:26
Book 5 is sexually explicit, and Chaol is 22. Goodreads censored this review.
Tower of Dawn (Throne of Glass) - Sarah J. Maas

UPDATE 09-12-17: Tower of dawn is one of the MOST read NEW ADULT READ THIS WEEK , MAAS HAD ALSO ONE OF THE MOST READ BOOKS IN THE EROTICA GENRE LAST WEEK 
description
I took screenshots, because those lists change every week. THRONE OF GLASS ISN'T A YOUNG ADULT SERIES even though they toned down the erotic scenes for this book. Young adult hasn't ever been a sexless genre contrary to popular belief, but Maas books are NEW ADULT and her content is erotic, not just graphic, it's erotic. 

description

UPDATE 09-15-17
Please check my friend Emer's review. I agree with her review
in so many accounts
Emer's A court of wing and ruin review

ORIGINAL RANT

NOT A SINGLE SERIES WRITTEN BY SARAH J. MAAS IS REALLY A YOUNG ADULT SERIES. All are new adult/adult and, in the case of A Court of Mist and Fury, erotica/erotic romance

Don't let some booktubers, Kirkus reviews, common sense media or some goodreads users tell you otherwise. They might have their own reasons to lie about this issue but trust only the reviews where the reviewers are willing to mention that this book isn't young adult or that mention the sexual content.

I repeat

NONE OF SARAH J. MAAS SERIES IS YOUNG ADULT. Perhaps book 1 and 2 of the throne of glass series have some young adult elements, but the rest of the book in the series is new adult. 

One more time I'll say this just because I still get reports of 12-13 YO kids reading A Court of Mist and Fury and also several libraries and bookstore have shelved Maas books in the YA section.

THRONE OF GLASS IS A NEW ADULT SERIES EXCEPT FOR THE FIRST TWO BOOKS, the rest is heavy on adult content. If any BOOKTUBER, Book blogger or Goodreads user (PLUS COMMON SENSE MEDIA AND KIRKUS REVIEWS) tells you otherwise it's because they are lying through their teeth. Don't trust them. Do your own research. You can start by reading pages 21, 22, 530, 531, 532, 533 of the harcover american version of A Court of Mist and Fury


Be careful if you're planning on giving any of Maas series as a book gift to an underage reader. It will make you look like a pervert because it's like giving Fifty shades of Gray. No I'm not exagerating. Several HONESTgoodreads users have mentioned Sarah J. Maas sexual scenes in their book reviews. Of course those reviews aren't visible as honest reviewers are rarely popular.

If sexual content doesn't bother you or you are of age then I think you are okay reading both series. I think A court of thorns and roses is the best one of the two. 

If you don't feel comfortable reading sexual content, or you aren't of age yet to read sexual content avoid the Throne of glass series and the A court of thorns and roses series.

If any teacher or librarian is reading my review, please be aware that trusted websites like Goodreads, Common sense media and Kirkus reviews have covered up the information regarding the sexual content and genre of Maas books.Maybe by mistake. But don't let them fool you. 

A COURT OF MIST AND FURY (book 2 of ACOTAR) A COURT OF WINGS AND RUIN (book 3 of ACOTAR) EMPIRE OF STORMS (book 5 of Throne of glass) and TOWER OF DAWN (book 6 of Throne of glass) AREN'T SUITABLE FOR UNDER 18 READERS 

All Sarah J. Maas series are new adult, meaning that they portray certain themes of the young adult genre but their characters are older and the violence and the sex are more in tune with adult reads. Most libraries and bookstores don't have a new adult section so Maas books should go to the adult section even though they are new adult. 

More on what New adult is HERE (Notice that SJM books are among the most read of the new adult genre)

description

New Adult fiction bridges the gap between Young Adult and Adult genres. It typically features protagonists between the ages of 18 and 30.

The genre tends to focus on issues prevalent in the young adult genre as well as focusing on issues experienced by individuals between the area of childhood and adulthood, such as leaving home for university and getting a job.

New adult is typically considered a subcategory of adult literature rather than young adult literature. Some popular new adult titles include The Magicians by Lev Grossman, A Court of Thorns and Roses by Sarah J. Maas, Beautiful Disaster by Jamie McGuire and Fangirl by Rainbow Rowel


Bloomsburry Children, the publishing company, has added some warnings in some editions in some countries. Those warning aren't present in all the editions of Maas books so be careful. If possible, Spread the voice, because pornographic content is often used by child abusers to lure their victims. Please don't let these books stand in the children section of your local bookstore.

ADDITIONAL NOTE: Some GR librarians will tell you that content and age of a book won't matter for a book to be considered as long as a young adult imprint is behind the publication of said book. 

Don't believe them. Fifty shades of grey and in this case Fifty shades of fae won't ever be young adult books even if there's a "children" imprint behind it. Besides Children and young adult are different genres so the deceiving name of the publishing company doesn't count if they are going to publish erotic content.

Also please don't comment in my review telling me "I'm x years old and I'm not disturbed by erotic content" or "I'm a parent and I let my kids read fifty shades of grey". Good for you but even if what you said was true, everyone is different. Some kids can handle adult content others can't, some 9-13 YO will keep buying books in the YA section of the bookstores and libraries because parents have the wrong impression (maybe because there are so many YA books turned movie) that YA is a sexless genre safe for 9-14 YO to read. Which in the case of Sarah J Maas and other New adult authors isn't the case.


description
description

I took those screenshots from this list:
https://www.goodreads.com/genres/most...

UPDATE 09-19-17
Thanks to Belle for sharing this picture, but how come an EROTIC/NEW ADULT series is a CHILDREN'S best seller? 
description

People please don't get decieved. Honest reviewers, please do your research and post a HONEST REVIEW that mentions the erotic content of the series (not this particular book) so parents, librarians, teachers and readers can make informed decisions about this series. Stop covering up for the publishing company.

04-22-2018
I understand Goodreads censoring my review to hide it from the main page as it seems they are playing into Bloomsburry agenda. But why hide it from my friends? I think it's responsibility of parents and readers to research what the content of a book is before buying/reading.  That's not a responsability of authors or publishers. But how are we the readers supposed to do that when Goodreads, Common sense media and some booktubers are so bent into hiding the information? Please Goodreads employees and editors, don't make it difficult for us the readers to find the appropiate information. Your DECISIONS should be considering ALL goodreads members's best interests in mind, not just a few authors and publishers interests in mind.

Source: www.goodreads.com/review/show/2068533915
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text 2018-03-27 10:24
MY LIFE AS A BOOK REVIEWER

 

RRR

My Life as a Book Reviewer

 

By Dr. Wesley Britton

 

 I don’t know for certain, but I’m pretty sure my first published book review came out in 1981 for Joseph P. Lash’s Helen and Teacher, the historian’s dual biography of Helen Keller and Anne Sullivan Macy.   I forget the name of the periodical, but I recall it was a newspaper printed for the Dallas-based Association of Individuals with Disabilities.

 

 In 1983,  I became a graduate student in American Literature at the University of North Texas. Very quickly, I began hearing the oft-repeated mantra of “Publish or Perish.” That phrase sounds very simple, but not so fast.
Back in those days, unless you were part of a Creative Writing department, publishing “primary sources”—meaning any creative writing, poetry, short stories, or novels—didn’t count toward your career path.  The research-oriented English departments wanted “secondary sources,” meaning scholarly studies of recognized classics or even short studies of other book-length scholarly studies.  It was all about critical analysis. Your resume could also include book reviews, especially reviews of literary histories, biographies, or even more scholarly studies. With luck, you could present your non-paid-for articles at academic conventions where, of course, you paid your own way to attend.

 Those conventions turned out to be goldmines in terms of networking, especially meeting editors of academic periodicals who gave out book review assignments.   Especially for new scholarly editions written by and for academics in specific subject areas. These often-expensive tomes were nice items not to have to pay for.

 Which lead to my earliest reviews for publications like Texas Books in ReviewThe Journal of American Studies of TexasSouthern Quarterly, and American Periodicals. In turn, this to me becoming the main reviewer for the then-new online list-serve, The Mark Twain Forum. For years, I wrote many reviews for them and I believe you can still see all of them today at the Forum’s archives. That was where I learned online periodicals didn’t have to worry about word counts, always an important consideration for print assignments.

 After I earned my Ph.D., I had one quest in mind.  Writing reviews for which I got paid. That didn’t always happen. For Choice Magazine, I was assigned titles for which I wrote very short reviews of around 300 words for librarians who had one question in mind—is this a book we should buy and shelve? That was another good example of knowing your audience—writing for a specific purpose with a very limited word count.

 Then I did get paid work from Magill’s Book Reviews, Literary Annuals in between writing all manner of encyclopedia articles. During those years, my target audience was very broad and very non-academic.  It was a very different approach from most everything I’d written before. It was very liberating.

 By 1999 or so, I decided I was tired of writing short things. I wanted to write books and have reviewers review me.  So began my four books on espionage in the media followed by my six book sci-fi series. But I kept my hand in book reviewing.  For around a decade, I reviewed all manner of fiction and non-fiction for online sites devoted to spies in one guise or another. Once again, I had a very specific audience, readers already familiar with spy novels, TV shows, or films.  If your audience is already knowledgeable in one subject area or another, then you pitch your approach to those who might know as much or more than you do about the topic.

 Somewhere in all that, all manner of projects opened up for me.  I don’t recall when or why, but editor Norm Goldman invited me to join his cadre of reviewers for BookPleasures.com. I still write for him. What really opened up was the range of books I could review—murder mysteries, histories, celebrity memoirs, espionage thrillers, sci-fi.  And the assignments come in a variety of ways. Several times a week, Norm sends out blitzes of press releases from authors, publishers, and publicists seeking book reviews at BP. We reviewers than express our interest in whatever titles intrigue us, and Norm makes his assignments.  These days, I also get press releases sent directly to me usually because a publisher or publicist likes something I wrote. They hope to interest me in other books by the same author or books of a similar nature.

 Along the way, I also reviewed books, CDs, and DVDs for BlogCritics.org.  What made them different was the meticulous nature of their editors.  I have always treasured good editors, and BC had some excellent ones.  I stopped writing for BC when they made changes in their submission format and really made reviewers work to post reviews with all sorts of hoops to leap through at their site. Well, since they weren’t paying anything, getting free books, CDs, and DVDs just wasn’t worth all the hassle.

 So what have I learned over the decades and what can I pass along to you?

 It seems pretty clear one key lesson is to know what audience you’re writing for as that frames so much of our reviews.  It can determine length—especially for online sites—and the content—do you have a knowledgeable audience or are you addressing the general reader?

I’ve always felt the primary purpose of a reviewer is to give potential readers enough information so they can decide for themselves if they want to try a specific book or not.  That’s one reason many reviewers mention the names of authors who are similar to the title being reviewed, giving readers a connection to familiar writers of the same genre.

 Whether or not I like a specific title really isn’t the point. So in pretty much every review, I’ve ever written, I point out just what audiences would be most interested in a particular book.  Just because I don’t like or am mildly responsive to a new book doesn’t mean there’s not a readership out there who would love it.

 I admit, over the years, I’ve gotten my fair share of grumpy responses from authors.  Mostly, they didn’t think a specific review was glowing enough.  Or I didn’t praise enough one aspect or another of their effort. I don’t think I’ve written that many out-and-out bad reviews.  I can think of two; one was simply a dishonest project, the other was supposedly a non-fiction study so personal that it was not worth the time of the subject’s fans.

 I also admit I still have a hard time getting excited by Amazon reviews.  Recently, I was part of a Facebook group’s debate over whether reviews posted at sites other than Amazon were equal to the usual short paragraphs posted on the Zon. Yes, most readers go to the Zon and perhaps nowhere else. On the other hand, many serious readers—and therefore potential buyers—go to other places to get more developed reviews than the often general and unedited paint-by-numbers Amazon reviews.   Consider sites devoted to specific genres, for one example.  Consider such reviews aren’t likely paid for or written by author friends or supporters. Consider the in-depth analysis places like BookPleasures.com or BlogCritics.org offer.

True, there are countless personal blogs that don’t have a lot of credibility.  The lack of proper editing is one problem with such places. And credibility can be a valuable thing when publishers hunt for useful blurbs and quotes to promote books.  After the reviewer’s name, the name of a reliable publication is not a bad thing at all.  The Zon doesn’t count. So I’ very happy to see excerpts from my reviews included in other author’s media kits. Or reposted at places like The Midwest Book Review or The New Book Review Blog.

 Writing book reviews can help build up your writing portfolio, especially if you can find ways to have your reviews posted at sites that have good reputations and a good-sized readership.  These days, reposting our reviews is good for both the book authors and the reviewer.  Getting published at a good site or periodical is the beginning, but then you can repost at Amazon, your personal blogs at Goodreads, Book Likes, or wherever, And at the book’s page at Goodreads. Normally, you should include where the review originally appeared so that publication can get credit.  Like the authors we review, we too want to reach a wide readership.

 

Contact Wesley if you’re interested in a review exchange.

 Dr. Wesley Britton,

Author, The Beta Earth Chronicles

Reviewer, BookPleasures.com

 Explore the Beta Earth Chronicles website:

 Follow Wes Britton’s Goodreads blog:

 Check out Wes Britton’s Beta Earth Chronicles Facebook page:

 Enjoy the videos at Wes Britton’s YouTube Channel:

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text 2018-03-14 21:20
For Shame, GoodReads

As much as I loved to hate "Alaska Liz" and her contrariness - she has just been kicked out of the GR Feedback group, because she told Otis (on his embracing the suggestion that GR needed twitter-style "@person" notification in posts) "In the meantime, you've been doing things to GR's detriment.  And you know how much I love this site, I just hate seeing it go down the drain."

 

Thread: GR "Mention Other Users in Reviews"

 

For shame, GR, for shame.

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