logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Gravity
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-09-09 04:50
Gravity Falls Season 1.5
Gravity Falls Lost Legends - Hirsch, Alex

Alex Hirsch, the creator of the Gravity Falls TV series, wrote all four stories in this graphic novel. It feels like a glimpse of some episodes we might have seen if another season had been produced before the series finale.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-09-05 14:38
On Preterition: "Gravity's Rainbow" by Thomas Pynchon
Gravity's Rainbow - Thomas Pynchon


I think I found it difficult in the sense of its denseness in fact. Well, I find it hard to answer the “difficulty” question with much certainty; I'm equivocating. I don't love it all equally no, that's not the case. There are parts that I prefer immeasurably to others however, simply because I prefer I'm not sure whether that persuades me that it would be 'better' in some sense without them. I don't have the figures for specific chapters with me but I do know that Joyce added a lot to some of the later chapters - from Oxen of the Sun to Ithaca I think - meaning that the manuscript expanded in proof. I think you notice this as you read it, right?

 

 

If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-08-17 19:32
Gravity Curves Space-time. That’s It: "On Gravity: A Brief Tour of a Weighty Subject" by Anthony Zee
On Gravity: A Brief Tour of a Weighty Subject - A. Zee


“That space and time are replaced by spacetime immediately tells us how a field, be it electromagnetic or gravitational, varies in time once we know how it varies in space.”

In “On Gravity: A Brief Tour of a Weighty Subject” by Anthony Zee


“Einstein says the space-time is curved and that objects take the path of least distance in getting from one point in to another in space-time. The curvature of space-time tells the apple, the stone, and the cannonball to follow the same path from the top of the tower to the ground.”

In “On Gravity: A Brief Tour of a Weighty Subject” by Anthony Zee


“Gravity curves space-time. That’s it.”

In “On Gravity: A Brief Tour of a Weighty Subject” by Anthony Zee



On August 17, 2017 two neutron stars collide (Zee references this in his book). 

Let me hypothesize: consider a particle on the surface of one of the neutron stars belonging to a pair, about 10 km from the centre. It's being pulled downwards by an enormous gravitational force - about a hundred billion times stronger than gravity on the Earth's surface (if I calculated it right). But if the particle is going really, really fast (for example, close to the speed of light) it's still able to escape the star and not get pulled back in.

There's more stuff on the other side of the rainbow: you can read the full review.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-07-26 14:27
Letting Go Of Gravity
Letting Go Of Gravity - Meg Leder

"That's what friends do- they remind you of who you are underneath all the stuff people believe about you, all the stuff you believe about yourself."

Charlie and Parker are twins. During childhood, they always had each other's back. However, they were always two different people; Charlie is extroverted, loud, popular and easily makes friends, Parker is introverted, guarded and needs approval.  One other difference arose when Charlie and Parker were in fourth grade, Charlie got leukemia.  As medical bills rose and their parents lived in fear, Parker vowed to become a doctor and help kids with leukemia.  Now it is coming true, as Parker graduates valedictorian of her class with an internship at a hospital and an acceptance to Harvard, and Charlie is in remission for a second time.  When it's time to begin the internship, Parker feels overwhelmed and panicked at even being in the hospital.  She quits, reconnects with an old friend and finds a job at a pottery shop and the weight lifts.  Now, if she could only tell her parents.

Letting go of gravity is an epic coming of age tale that so many teens will be able to connect with.  It is not only Parker's story either, it is also Charlie's.  For so much of Parker's life she has strived to be what her parents expect that she has lost herself.  For Charlie's life, he has been the boy with cancer that people have given up their lives to help.  They both just want to stop being people's expectations for them and learn to be themselves, but they will need each other to do it.  I could easily relate to Parker and was swept up in her story, eagerly turning the pages to see how she would manage the twists and turns in her life.  Even though I have never had to deal with cancer, Charlie was also intriguing.  His journey in and out of remission while being a teen is very sincere and heart wrenching, even when he is ok.  Charlie and Parker's journey took me through emotional highs and lows that reminded me of the transitional time after high school.  In addition to this, the romances were very sweet and realistic.  Overall, a roller-coaster of a story about self-realization and being able to become who you truly are.

This book was received for free in return for an honest review.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-11-06 17:17
#Audiobook Review: Shooting for the Stars by Sarina Bowen
Shooting for the Stars: Gravity, Book 3 - Blunder Woman Productions,Emma Wilder,Sarina Bowen,Noel Garraux Harrison

Stella Lazarus has loved her big brother’s best friend ever since she can remember. Stella tried to show Bear how she felt years ago, but he brushed her off. So she has to be satisfied with just being good friends. Bear thinks Stella is the sexiest woman alive, but she’s his best friend’s little sister, which means she’s off limits, and it has taken every ounce of will power to keep her at arms length. But when the pair find themselves alone in an upscale hotel room after a few drinks and good food, neither Stella nor Bear can say no to the years of denied attraction. Stella and Bear share an amazing, fantasy-fulfilling night together, but it all comes to a quick end when Bear freaks out about breaking the bro-code and not being good enough for Stella, coupled with Stella’s brother’s career-ending accident. 

 

Shooting for the Stars opens just before the start of the second Gravity book, Falling From the Sky and Hank’s horrific accident. The book then jumps ten months, keeping it on pace with the timing of Falling from the Sky. Although there is a lot of overlap in the timing of books #2 and #3, the story is completely different, with Hank playing a minor roll in this title.

 

Stella and Bear are best friends who are perfect for one another, but something always prevents it from happening. Mostly it’s on Bear - he’s afraid to open up and face his feelings head on. When they are together - whether as friends, potential lovers, or awkward and unsure companions - they capture my attention. Both carry around so much baggage and pain, love and hope; their interactions are emotionally fulfilling. However, much of the first half of the book is spent in lengthy flashbacks, and the dynamic of the budding romance stumbles during these interludes. I appreciate knowing more of their history, but at the same time, the author established their deep connection early (starting some in the second book), so jumping to the past pulled me out of the present. Additionally, during much of the middle of the book, the pair avoids each another. 

 

But then, Bear starts making his movie and the couple are forced to spend time together. Unlike most romances where we see characters working to come together, Bear and Stella spend time trying to stay apart. So, the story must rely on inner monologues to help readers understand that the feelings are still ever present, even if they both are trying hard to forget them. I really enjoyed listening as both Bear and Stella mature and come to terms with their feelings and needs. Toss in a close brush with death, and everything gets laid out on the table. And Hank’s reaction to his best friend and sister being together is priceless.

 

Shooting for the Stars brings listeners the third set of narrators for the Gravity series. While I can appreciate having different narrators because each book has a different set of main characters, it is also a bit discombobulating having different voices for characters I’ve known for two or three books. Right from the start I feel Ms. Wilder has a strong performance. With an almost breathless quality, she captures Stella’s desire and hopes. As the book goes on, I feel the female narrator does an excellent job of growing with her character. On the other hand, I had trouble with Mr. Harrison as soon as I heard him. At my usual 1.25x speed, his performance is riddled with dramatic pauses and unnecessary rests. It reminded me of the young Captain Kirk. Well, not that bad, but it’s start, stop, pause, start, stop, pause. I sped the playback up to 1.5x, and that helped, and overtime, I was able to get past the cadence issues. I did like the quality of his voice, which was deep and sexy, but the start/stop nature ruined much of that for me.

 

Overall, I liked Shooting for the Stars and getting Bear and Stella’s story. The early middle was a little slow, with a lot of flashbacks, followed by so much avoidance, that the story dragged at times. However, it all feels very genuine. The fear of losing a friend, the guilt, the longing, etc., and in the end, I liked how it all played out.

 

My Rating: B
Female narrator: B+

Male narrator: C+ 

 

Audiobook review copy provided by Blunder Woman Productions

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?