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review 2018-11-19 16:51
Heidegger [...] udowodnił, że współczesne połączenie wiedzy i postępu technicznego doprowadziło do nieodwracalnie wyobcowania człowieka w świecie.
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review 2018-11-07 14:23
ARC REVIEW Highland Wolf by Hannah Howell

Highland Wolf (Murray Family, #15)

 

The Murrays #15, Originally published in '07 this edition has a new cover, I love the new cover. I liked this one more than the last Howell book I read. This one was just fine to pick up and read even though I haven't read the first 14 books. I truly enjoyed how this one played out and the characters were well written. Three years ago James Drummond was accused of murdering his wife; cast as an outlaw he went into hiding biding his time before he can come back prove his innocence and claim his land and his daughter. Annora MacKay the poor relation who was born on the wrong side of the sheets was moved Dunncraig Keep to take care of her cousin's daughter. 

Donnell MacKay is a selfish brute of a man who worries more about fancy living than the tenants of the Keep and village, his second is no better. Annora knows something is not right with Donnell's story and even though he tries to alienate her from the rest of the people they still like her and trust her more than they like Donnell. James needed access inside the keep to search for proof that he was framed. Under the disguise of a French woodcarver he easily gains entrance. With the help of Big Berta, the cook, James starts his search but Annora is there to tempt him. Once Annora finds out the truth about James she starts to help which pays off for they soon discover the truth but they still need concrete proof for the King's man to take action against Donnell. Their timetable is forced to move up when Donnell announces that Annora has to marry his second in command. James having already fallen in love with her won't let that happen.

 

Overall, it was a good read. I liked the characters and the plot. The romance between James and Annora pretty much instintaneous the sparks flew and by the time they gave in the chemistry between was combustible. Meggie, James' daughter, was adorable and wise beyond her years. Big Berta is a force to be reckoned with. It had a heartwarming and funny ending.  

 

 

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text 2018-10-19 11:40
REVIEW BY ANGI - The Afterlife of Walter Augustus by Hannah M. Lynn
The Afterlife of Walter Augustus - Hannah M. Lynn

Walter Augustus is dead. His current state of existence has become a monotony of sweet tea and lonely strolls and after decades stuck in the Interim — a posthumous waiting room for those still remembered on Earth — he is ready to move on. Only when he is forgotten by every living person will he be able to pass over and join his family in the next stage of the afterlife. At last the end is tantalizingly close, but bad luck and a few rash decisions may see him trapped in the Interim for all eternity. 

Letty Ferguson is not dead. Letty Ferguson is a middle-aged shoe saleswoman who leads a pleasant and wholly unextraordinary life, barring the secret fortune she seems unable to tell her husband about. However, when she takes possession of an unassuming poetry anthology, life takes on a rather more extraordinary dimension.

 

Source: archaeolibrarian.wixsite.com/website/single-post/2018/10/10/The-Afterlife-of-Walter-Augustus-by-Hannah-M-Lynn
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review SPOILER ALERT! 2018-10-15 15:00
Review: Bum Fight- an Unlikely Journey from Hopeless to Humanitarian by Rufus Hannah & Barry Soper

 

 
'A Bum Deal: A Memoir' is the story of the man who was the face of the infamous website BumFights, Rufus Hannah, aka Rufus the Stunt Bum. It chronicles his journey from early alcoholism and social misfit into a symbol of unrestrained greed and disregard for human life and finally a voice for others with similar troubles. It's a story that sounds clichéd in our times but still occurs all too often. And as is often the case, a human face and voice are what's needed to drive the issues home.

It almost seems Rufus was doomed from the start. Coming from southern working class parents with alcohol problems, he was born jaundiced due to his mother's drinking. Even so, they often resorted to the old southern remedy of lacing the baby bottle with vodka to keep the child quiet. Yet the parents instilled a work ethic into all of their children that served him well when little else did.

His journey takes him through failed marriages and jobs lost due to alcoholism across country and finally to San Diego where he meets Donnie, a fellow vet with similar problems. They migrate to Donnie's hometown of La Mesa where they manage an existence as the only homeless men in the town and are somewhat absorbed into the community. At the insistence of another resident they're hired on as handymen by Barry Soper, a local businessman. The three men are mistrustful of each other but over time they develop a real friendship- especially Rufus and Barry.

A chance encounter with a HS student with a video camera- Ryan McPherson- sets them on the path to notoriety together. Ryan's callousness towards the two men is apparent to Rufus from the start but as he supplies them with the necessities, namely booze, they feel obligated to go along. Heat from the cops forces Ryan to move operations to Vegas, where things start to spiral out of control. Rufus and Donnie realize the danger they're in and contact their friend Barry, who helps spring them and gets Rufus on the road to recovery.

This reads as a complete stream of consciousness work, as if Rufus simply talked about his life and the notes were sorted out. Events leap around a few times, especially in the beginning, as people and events are suddenly thrust upon you with little preamble. There's also some gaps left open towards the ending- especially his attempt to repair his relationship with his children, that's never followed up and leaves you wondering.

'A Bum Deal' is not exceptional but intriguing at times and insightful into the mindset of an alcoholic. Rufus' emotions are raw and unfiltered, underscoring his helplessness, frustration and acceptance of his situation as well as his struggle to get them under control to save himself. It also provides a few details about the BumFight phenomenon, but more importantly, it's about the redemption of a man who fell too many times to pick himself up without the help of someone who cared enough to do so. And who doesn't need a helping hand once in a while?

 

 

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review 2018-10-14 18:59
Till It Stops Beating - Hannah R. Goodman

I received this book for free in exchange for an honest review as part of a blog tour for the book. 

 

This is my second time reading Hannah R. Goodman. I had previously read the YA anthology book she edited and contributed to, Sucker Literary Magazine Vol. 1. I remember really enjoying it so I was excited to read this book. 

 

Going into this book I did not know that it was part of a series so in the beginning I was a tad bit confused because there were a lot of reference to things that happened in the past. However, I was still able to piece together what happened in the previous books, so you can read this book as a standalone. 

 

This was a very touching and realistic story full of emotion and heart. It tackled a lot of heavy topics like cancer and anxiety in a respectful and caring way. There was a good balance between the happy moments and the more somber ones. 

 

As to what I didn’t like, the ending felt a but rushed to me. It ended pretty quickly. I would have liked for it to have been fleshed out a little more. 

 

There was also one line in the book that didn’t sit well with me. In describing the main character’s trip to NYC the book states, “We are right in front of one of those grocery stores that reek of Asian food and rotten produce” (83). I don’t quite know what this line was trying to get at, but to me it seemed like a slight jab at Asian grocery stores since they can sometimes be smelly. 

 

Overall, this was a wonderful and moving book. It had a few flaws, but was still an enjoyable read. 

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