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review 2014-11-01 18:52
The Uncommon Memories of Zeenat Querishi by Veena Nagpal

When I was asked if I would like to review this book, I immediately said yes because I thought it would be interesting to learn about the culture of India – a culture which is very different from the one in which I live. I began to read and was immediately immersed in the middle of an age-old disagreement between two Indian families – one Hindu and the other Muslim. Intriguing to me. However, as I read further I became hopelessly lost – more and more so as I continued to read. Several times I had to backtrack and reread several chapters in order to progress. This was annoying at the least. The author’s descriptions of localities and people was detailed, in fact sometimes too much so. I felt they detracted from the story trying to be told. Many times things were described and prayers or phrases offered up by characters without explanation for Western readers.

 

Sadly, I must admit defeat. I tried for over eight weeks to make my way through this book but only made it half way. I’m sure that the story is easily read and understood by those who have a greater understanding of the Indian culture. I can sense the depth of the story lurking in the second half of the book and hope someday to give it another chance.

 

Disclaimer: I was provided with a copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

Source: marionmarchetto.com/wp/blog/page/2
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review 2014-04-16 08:15
Brahma Dreaming - Review.
Brahma Dreaming: Legends from Hindu Mythology - John Jackson,Daniela Jaglenka Terrazzini

 

Thank you to the publisher for the review copy.

 

Published by: JJ Books.

 

Brahma Dreaming” is master storyteller John Jackson s latest collaboration with the acclaimed artist, Daniela Jaglenka Terrazzini.John s intriguing versions of the tales of the Hindus great gods are graced by Daniela s brilliantly reimagined illustrations of the deities, each a masterpiece of detail and drama.

 

First of all, this really is a beautiful looking and feeling book – aesthetically speaking it is a wonder and I am extremely happy to have it in my ever growing book collection – it is one I will return to a great deal I imagine to enjoy the wonderful illustrations and, indeed, some of the stories within it. Large hardback with a ribbon bookmarker, absolutely perfect.

 

I went into this with no expectations at all, I had no idea what to expect considering I had no prior knowledge beyond the extremely peripheral of Hindu Mythology. Not a book I would have immediately put on my reading list it has to be said, and that would have been a shame.

 

It was VERY easy to immerse myself in these tales and alongside the absolutely stunning illustrations (they stole the show if I’m honest) I found myself dipping in and out of this one alongside all my usual reads and considered it a treat each and every single time. The stories are broken down, after the three Gods Brahma, Vishnu and Shiva. Each one a little gem and a fabulous way to get a feel for the culture and stunning mythology surrounding each one, yet told in the authors own way and with his own particular twist.

 

I’ll talk a little more about the illustrations for a moment – such creativity and so elaborate that you will find something new every time you go back – and a perfect accessory to the stories being told, bringing each and every one to life. Fantastic.

 

Overall I would say this would be a perfect present for someone interested in the subject matter OR someone who appreciates the fine art and absolute grace of an appealing and handsome looking book.

 

If you fancy this one, get the proper book. Not the Kindle version. That would be my advice for any avid reader or book collector.

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review 2013-11-30 14:44
A Letter to a Hindu
A Letter to a Hindu - Leo Tolstoy

bookshelves: under-100-ratings, philosophy, fraudio, published-1908, epistolatory-diary-blog, essays

Read from August 28 to November 30, 2013


photo redboyhydra_zpsfe9a9108.gif

BLURB: A Letter to a Hindu (also known as A Letter to a Hindoo) was a letter written by Leo Tolstoy to Tarak Nath Das in 1908. The letter was written in response to two letters sent by Das, seeking support from the famous Russian author and thinker, for India's independence from British colonial rule. The letter was published in the Indian newspaper Free Hindustan. The letter caused the young Mohandas Gandhi to write to the world-famous Tolstoy to ask for advice and for permission to reprint the Letter in Gandhi's own South African newspaper, Indian Opinion, in 1909. Mohandas Gandhi was stationed in South Africa at the time and just beginning his lifelong activist career. He then translated the letter himself, from the original English copy sent to India, into his native Gujarati.

In A Letter to a Hindu, Tolstoy argued that only through the principle of love could the Indian people free themselves from colonial British rule. Tolstoy saw the law of love espoused in all the world's religions, and he argued that the individual, non-violent application of the law of love in the form of protests, strikes, and other forms of peaceful resistance were the only alternative to violent revolution. These ideas ultimately proved to be successful in 1947 in the culmination of the Indian Independence Movement.

This letter, along with Tolstoy's views and preaching, helped to form Mohandas Gandhi's views about non-violent resistance. Gandhi's familiarity with Tolstoy began with his reading of The Kingdom of God is Within You, which argues for a literal interpretation of Christian principles. Non-violent resistance was a major part of Tolstoy's own view of Christianity.


In this letter Tolstoy referred to the Tamil Tirukkuṛaḷ as The Hindu Kural.

WRITTEN BY: Leo Tolstoy

INTRODUCTION BY: M.K. Gandhi

NARRATED BY: Michael Scott

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review 2013-09-16 00:00
King Vikram and the Vampire: Classic Hindu Tales of Adventure, Magic, & Romance - Richard Francis Burton I have the 1870 first edition which I found in a book store in Bath. It's the oldest book in my collection. I bought it for 16 pounds (about 25 dollars at the time) and I have no idea if that was a good price in 1983 or not. I would love to read it but the paper is so delicate I'm afraid to. I better go out and buy the paperback!
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review 2013-08-27 00:00
A Letter to a Hindu - Leo Tolstoy A Letter to a Hindu - Leo Tolstoy BLURB: A Letter to a Hindu (also known as A Letter to a Hindoo) was a letter written by Leo Tolstoy to Tarak Nath Das in 1908. The letter was written in response to two letters sent by Das, seeking support from the famous Russian author and thinker, for India's independence from British colonial rule. The letter was published in the Indian newspaper Free Hindustan. The letter caused the young Mohandas Gandhi to write to the world-famous Tolstoy to ask for advice and for permission to reprint the Letter in Gandhi's own South African newspaper, Indian Opinion, in 1909. Mohandas Gandhi was stationed in South Africa at the time and just beginning his lifelong activist career. He then translated the letter himself, from the original English copy sent to India, into his native Gujarati.In A Letter to a Hindu, Tolstoy argued that only through the principle of love could the Indian people free themselves from colonial British rule. Tolstoy saw the law of love espoused in all the world's religions, and he argued that the individual, non-violent application of the law of love in the form of protests, strikes, and other forms of peaceful resistance were the only alternative to violent revolution. These ideas ultimately proved to be successful in 1947 in the culmination of the Indian Independence Movement.This letter, along with Tolstoy's views and preaching, helped to form Mohandas Gandhi's views about non-violent resistance.[1] Gandhi's familiarity with Tolstoy began with his reading of The Kingdom of God is Within You, which argues for a literal interpretation of Christian principles. Non-violent resistance was a major part of Tolstoy's own view of Christianity.In this letter Tolstoy referred to the Tamil Tirukkuṛaḷ as The Hindu Kural.WRITTEN BY: Leo TolstoyINTRODUCTION BY: M.K. GandhiNARRATED BY: Michael Scott
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