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text 2018-07-18 22:10
Reading progress update: I've read 47%.
The Silk Road: A New History - Valerie Hansen

Here we go again, the book stops at around 67% with the rest being notes and references.

 

Do I keep reading and finish the book or do I want to get a good night's sleep?

 

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review 2018-07-18 18:46
My first time reading Adam Silvera but definitely not my last!!!!!
History Is All You Left Me - Adam Silvera

Wow I don't know what to say exactly about this book. I really loved it. I love how humans Griffin is,  what I mean by this is that his not prefect and he knows that. And he doesn't blame other people for his faults. 

I felt so bad for him with the loss of Theo. I was kind of surprised about things you find out about towards the end of the book. But I was happy that I was wrong about how it would end. 

I don't have my book around me right now so I can't look for the name. But my favorite side character was Griffin and Theo's friend, I really liked him a lot. 

I loved how other books and movies were mentioned in the book, such as Harry Potter and Stars. 

Definitely had tears in my eyes a lot throughout the story. I really want to read They both die at the end, but I am afraid that I would definitely cry if I do.

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review 2018-07-18 18:44
Good, if somewhat dated, overview of America's war in the Pacific and Asia
Eagle Against The Sun: The American War With Japan - Ronald H. Spector

In the 1960s Macmillan began publishing a series entitled "The Macmillan Wars of the United States." Written by some of the nation's leading military historians, its volumes offered surveys of the various conflicts America had fought over the centuries, the strategies employed, and the services which fought them. Ultimately fourteen volumes were published over two decades, with many of them still serving as excellent accounts of their respective subjects.

 

As the last book published in the series, Ronald Spector's contribution to it serves as a sort of capstone to its incomplete efforts. In it he provides an account of the battles and campaigns waged by the United States against Japan in the Second World War, from the prewar planning and the assumptions held in the approach to war to the deployment of the atomic bombs that ended it. In between the covers all of the major naval battles and island-hopping campaigns in the Pacific, as well as America's military efforts in the China-Burma-India theater. He rounds out his coverage with chapters discussing both the social composition of the forces America deployed and the complex intelligence operations against the Japanese, ones that extended beyond the now-famous codebreaking efforts that proved so valuable.

 

Though dated in a few respects, overall Spector's book serves as a solid single-volume survey of the war waged by the United States against Japan. By covering the efforts against the Japanese in mainland Asia, he incorporates an important aspect of the war too often overlooked or glossed over in histories of America's military effort against the Japanese, one that often influenced developments elsewhere in the theater. Anyone seeking an introduction to America's war with Japan would be hard pressed to find a better book, which stands as a great example of what Macmillan set out to accomplish when they first embarked upon the series.

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text 2018-07-18 14:00
New Release! Prince of York: A Story of Reginald Pole

I am so excited for this day! Reginald Pole has been the most fascinating person that I have had the pleasure to study. I admire him in so many ways, and, while part of me wishes he had been a bit more ambitious, another part has to admit that is one of the characteristics that makes him so honorable. I hope that you enjoy reading this novella as much as I enjoyed writing it!

 

 

 

Source: mybook.to/PrinceOfYork
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review 2018-07-17 18:23
STRANGER IN THE HOUSE: Examining War's Impact Upon Women & Families
Stranger in the House: Women's Stories of Men Returning from the Second World War - Julie Summers

"STRANGER IN THE HOUSE: Women's Stories of Men Returning from the Second World War" is made up of multi-layered stories spanning generations of the adjustments women in Britain had to make upon the return of their husbands or sweethearts from war.   Many of these men had served in the military in places as diverse as France, Italy, India, Singapore, and Java during various stages of the war.   Indeed, a large majority of these men ended up as POWs of the Germans (most of them ended up in prisoner-of-war camps in Germany and Poland for almost 5 years) or the Japanese.   The ones who were prisoners of the Japanese suffered the worst in terms of physical and psychological abuse.

 

Many of these stories I found deeply moving.   Julie Summers is to be commended for her research into an aspect of the war and its impact on families that has been little explored by historians.     It is my hope that a similar book will be written, detailing the impact of the Second World War on returning American veterans and their families.

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