logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Horror
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2017-08-18 22:19
Halloween Bingo 2017!

It's that time again: Halloween Bingo! This is the second year I will be participating, and hopefully this time I won't get bogged down in reader's block. Below is my custom Halloween Bingo card (thanks, Moonlight Reader!), and my novel choices. At the moment this is a working list; things could certainly change depending on my mood . . . I tend to be pretty indecisive in regards to my TBR. 

 

 

The Dead Will Walk: The Walking, by Bentley Little 

Ghost: Ghost House, Clare McNally 

Werewolves: The Nightwalker, by Thomas Tessier 

Terror in a Small Town: Haven, by Tom Deady 

Diverse Voices: The Good House, by Tananarive Due 

 

Haunted Houses: Burnt Offerings, by Robert Manasco

Vampires: They Thirst, by Robert R. McCammon

Murder Most Foul: Sweet Aswang, by Anthony Hains 

Monsters: What Do Monsters Fear?, by Matt Hayward 

In the Dark, Dark Woods: In the Woods, by Tana French 

 

Witches: Grimm Memorials, by R. Patrick Gates 

Amateur Sleuth: Penpal, by Dathan Auerbach 

Supernatural: Mister B. Gone, by Clive Barker  

Darkest London: Incarnate, by Ramsey Campbell 

 

American Horror Story: Desperation, by Stephen King 

Classic Horror: Psycho, by Robert Bloch 

Genre Horror: Video Nasties, by Duncan Ralston 

Modern Masters of Horror: Sour Candy, by Kealan Patrick Burke 

'80 Horror: By Bizarre Hands, by Joe R. Lansdale 

 

Chilling Children: Suffer the Children, by Craig DiLouie

Serial Killer Spree: Whispers, by Dean R. Koontz

Demons: The Unborn, by David Shobin 

Terrifying Women: The Devil Crept In, by Ania Ahlborn 

Gothic: Candles Burning, by Tabitha King & Michael McDowell 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2017-08-17 00:04
Look!! Isn't it pretty? Thank you so much, MR!!

 

Now, as for filling in all those beautiful squares ...

 

 

I think my brain will be going full tilt tonight!

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-08-16 19:06
The Well by Marie Sexton
The Well - Marie Sexton

The Well is a perfectly creepy, atmospheric little read for those of you who don’t like their horror all up in your face. I’m not going to say it scared me, because books rarely do, but it did build up a dastardly little mystery that did make my skin crawl a time or two.

It’s told in two timelines.

 

Twelve years ago Haven is goaded into staying the night at a rumored haunted house by his cousin Elise. It didn’t take a lot of goading though because Haven’s crush, Pierce, was also attending. He knew nothing was likely to happen either ghostly-wise or with Pierce but off he goes with Elise, Pierce and a few other teens for a night of spooky fun. When Elise decides to throw a séance things take a sinister turn and later Elise disappears.

 

The other timeline is set in the present day. Since that fateful night, Haven has been haunted by the loss of his favorite cousin Elise and spent most of his youth believing one of the teens present that night committed murder and has distanced himself from them. He’s become a horror writer to excise those demons but hasn’t kept in touch with his old group of friends – until now. Pierce, now a tv ghost hunter, has returned to town to do a segment on the vacant house and he wants Haven to participate. Old lusts are reignited as well as old suspicions . . .

 

There is a little romance here so if you don’t like that sort of thing invading your horror fiction you have been warned. Mostly this book is a slow burning murder-mystery with a side helping of ghostliness. I enjoyed watching it all unfold and especially loved the ghost-busting segment where scary sh*t actually happened! It kept me guessing and had just the right mix of thrills, atmosphere and engaging characters.

 

I received a copy of this book from Netgalley courtesy of author Marie Sexton.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-08-16 02:40
Bookburners by Max Gladstone, Margaret Dunlap, Mur Lafferty, Brian Francis Slattery - My Thoughts
Bookburners - Mur Lafferty,Max Gladstone,Margaret Dunlap,Brian Francis Slattery

This is a serial book - that is, 16 episodes strung together like a season of TV shows, each episode written by one of the 4 authors.  One of the reasons I picked it up was because I had read one of Max Gladstone's Craft Sequence novels and enjoyed it. 

Anyway, it appears that I'm not really a huge fan of the serial experience.  It's not my preferred style of book.  I just find it tends to go on for too long, maybe.  Or maybe it's the pacing that I'm not fond of.  I'm not bright enough to figure out the reasons.  *LOL*

But also, I'm not a fan of urban horror fantasy.  I mean, I like the premise.  I like the characters for the most part but it's the horror part that's not my favourite.  I'll read them and if the the characters are captivating and the plot intriguing, I can usually deal with the actual horror parts - like the intense descriptions of monsters and dungeons and lairs and the like. 

So, after that caveat, Bookburners was a good read for the most part.  The 4 different author styles weren't jarring, as a matter of fact they were all rather similar and I'm not familiar enough with them to know if it was worked towards in this project or just something that they all have in common.  The main character, Sal, I couldn't quite enjoy until about 2/3rds of the way through the book.  I just didn't like her very much.  I was fascinated by the other members of her team though. 

Will I read the next seasons of Bookburners?  Maybe.  If they come up on sale at some point.  I enjoyed this one enough to be curious about where they go next with the story. 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-08-15 22:30
The Devil's Own Work by Alan Judd, narrated by Matt Godfrey
The Devil's Own Work - Alan Judd,Owen King

 

The Devil's Own Work is a beautifully written, subtly told Faustian tale, which the narrator performs perfectly.

 

A man relates the story of his friend, Edward, and how he became a famous and successful writer. A writer who, although he writes many words, ultimately has nothing of substance to say. Further along, we discover that Edward inherited a manuscript from a recently deceased author named Tyrell. With that manuscript he also seems to have inherited a beautiful, ageless woman named Eudoxy.

 

As the story unfolds, we learn more about the manuscript, (which only can be read one letter at a time, because to try to see an actual word results in the reader seeing gibberish.) It's when this manuscript falls into Edward's hands that he suddenly becomes successful. Is that because of the manuscript itself, or because of the mysterious Eudoxy? You'll have to read this to find out!

 

This novella length story is tight and slow to build. There isn't necessarily a denouement, but instead a growing realization of horror and what is truly involved. If you are a reader expecting a lot of action, this isn't the tale for you. However, if you have a love of language and precise storytelling, AND this premise sounds intriguing to you, I highly recommend you give The Devil's Own Work a try. It probably won't provoke any screams or shouts of terror from you, but I bet it will give you a bad case of the heebies-jeebies.

 

Highly recommended!

 

*This audiobook was provided free of charge by the narrator, in exchange for my honest feedback. This is it.*

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?