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review 2018-02-24 03:04
Out of the Pocket (Audiobook)
Out of the Pocket - Bill Konigsberg

I can see why this is compared a lot to Openly Straight, but the differences were enough that it didn't feel like I was listening to the same story all over again.

 

Bobby's a high school senior and starting QB of the football team when he's outed. He's also got issues at home unrelated to this that he has to deal with at the same time. There was surprisingly little drama. Though Bobby has to overcome some prejudices and deal with some homophobes, he's also got a lot of support.

 

One thing to note: this is NOT a romance in any way shape or form, so don't expect that if you're going to read or listen to this. Bobby does eventually get a boyfriend, but it's a very small part of the story and not a "forever" boyfriend.

 

The humor worked for me here more than anything else, and the narrator did a good job for the most part. I have to question some of his voice choices, but that's a personal detail that might not bother others. Also, if you're only listening to the audiobook, the ebook has a bonus chapter of Bobby looking for colleges to play football for that can be considered an epilogue, and a brief "interview" with Bobby's friend Carrie that's short and sweet but doesn't really add much to the story.

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review 2018-02-23 15:10
It's a book with a blue cover and it starts with 'the'. Do you know which one I mean?
Weird Things Customers Say in Bookstores - Jen Campbell

Weird Things Customers Say in Bookstores by Jen Campbell is very reminiscent of I Work in a Public Library which I reviewed early last year. Both books include true stories of interactions and incidents that occurred in places which feature books as the main attraction. Jen's book talks about people who are so improbably strange I don't know how they were let out of the house much less let loose in a bookstore. Also, Ripping Yarns is a confusing name for a bookstore so I don't know why it's that unusual that people calling to find out if they sold yarn was so kooky it deserved its own subsection. (A yarn is another name for a story and 'ripping' is a term like 'awesome' hence Ripping Yarns.) Some of the things that stuck out for me were the customers that didn't seem to understand what is actually sold in bookstores. No, you can't buy hardware materials in a bookstore. That would be a hardware store. There were some true LOL moments like the lady who came in and couldn't remember which Danielle Steel books her mom had/hadn't read and asked the bookseller if SHE knew. *face palm* The chapter on parents and kids especially reminded me of what it's like being a Children's Librarian (there are a lot of interesting interactions, ya'll). One thing that really surprised me were the number of people who would approach the desk and ask about possible jobs but would be super weird about it. For example, telling the bookseller that there job looked super easy and then asking if they were hiring. If you're looking for funny anecdotes about what it's like to work in the book trade then you couldn't get more spot on than this book. It's a quick book that you can dip in and out of when you're looking for a laugh or if you just want to check if it's not just you that get involved in super weird conversations with strangers. 8/10

 

A/N: With this review we've finally reached the books I read in December of last year. *crowds do the wave*

 

A taste of what awaits you inside the book. [Source: Buzzfeed]

 

What's Up Next: Scythe by Neal Shusterman

 

What I'm Currently Reading: Gorillas in the Mist by Dian Fossey

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
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review 2018-02-20 02:51
I like to think that I'm pretty tech-savvy but...
Soonish: Ten Emerging Technologies That'll Improve and/or Ruin Everything - Kelly Weinersmith,Zach Weinersmith

I'm a naturally curious person (obvious to the longtime reader) and I really enjoy learning about the the world we inhabit. I especially enjoy discussions which forecast what our world might look like in the near to distant future. This book touched on a lot of that and much more (much of it out of my sphere of knowledge). Soonish: Ten Emerging Technologies That'll Improve and/or Ruin Everything by Kelly Weinersmith (with illustrations by Zach Weiner) covers everything from space settlements (and space elevators!) to computer brain interfaces (no thank you!) with Utah Array (basically multiple neuron points). The wide variety of topics explored should appeal to a diverse audience and if that doesn't do it the illustrations scattered throughout certainly will as they further explain extremely technical subjects through a pop science lens (some quite funny while others tried just a bit too hard). I have to give them a giant HOORAY for their excellent use of references such as George Church (remember him from Woolly?) which lent a more academic feel. Besides explaining what inventions we might see in the future, Weinersmith discusses the concerns both ethical and economical which could either delay or outright stall further development. The futurists among you would do well to check this book out to get excited for the years ahead while the cynics might want to get their hands on it to strengthen their arguments. ;-) 7/10

 

And this is why I'm terrified. [Source: Penguin Books]

 

What's Up Next: Kid Authors: True Tales of Childhood from Famous Writers by David Stabler

 

What I'm Currently Reading: Gorillas in the Mist by Dian Fossey

 

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
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review 2018-02-19 04:43
Artemis
Artemis: A Novel - Andy Weir

I have no idea quite how to rate this book so I'm going with 3.5 stars. My first impulse was 4 because I thoroughly enjoyed it, but then I finished it, sat back and actually thought. Most of the plot wouldn't have happened if the main character Jazz hadn't been such a petulant asshole, and pretty much everything is her fault. It's hard to feel sympathy for those kinds of characters, the ones that keep making terrible life choices over and over and never seem to learn. And then in the end get away Scott free. Talk about maddening. 

 

But the writing was well done, the plot moved along at nice clip, and the science seemed sound. Not too much over the top like in the original Jurassic Park books where I wanted to gouge out my eyes every time Malcolm talked. I just wish Weir had dialed it down on the bitch scale a bit because Jazz damn near ruined everything and seemed to think she was entitled to no punishment. Talk about arrogant.

 

 

P.S. early in my marriage we had a black pug named Artemis. He was a needy shit but we loved him. 

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review 2018-02-17 22:54
The Big Book of AutoCorrect Fails by Tim Dedopulos
The Big Book of Autocorrect Fails: Hundreds of Hilarious Howlers! - Tim Dedopulos

In theory, autocorrect is a genius feature that saves you from embarrassing errors. In reality, it seems to have a mind of its own, turning your innocent messages into inadvertently scandalous texts that could appall hardened war criminals and make veteran hookers blush. Fortunately, one person's humiliation is another's hilarity, and this big book gathers the very best (or worst, depending on your point of view) failed fixes, presenting them in the popular "bubble" conversation format that captures the progressive confusion, distress, and comedy as the autocorrect goes rogue.

Goodreads.com

 

 

Pretty much exactly what you'd guess from the title, just a hilarious gathering of autocorrect fails. Consider yourself warned though, the good majority of these are pretty dirty (sexually) or off-color/ definitely not PC in tone! That said, I honestly LOL'd on nearly every page. The curator of this collection gives his readers a tip to consider when crafting future texts: "For goodness' sake, be especially careful when using the words duck, aunt, election and tentacles."

 

* "butthurt potatoes"
* "5 inch Nazis"
* "should grab a bear sometime"
* "flapping horse ship"

 

Some pages here and there were just okay but honestly I appreciated that because it gave me a "breather" break between the funniest bits! Don't expect things to get too deep or literary, just enjoy it for what it is and allow yourself to laugh-cry for a bit :-)

 

American readers, be aware that this is published by a UK publisher, so there are moments of British slang here and there. The one that threw me personally was "spanners" but apparently that means "wrench"?

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