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text 2016-09-01 18:51
August Reading Review
Shinju - Laura Joh Rowland
Caveat Emptor - Ruth Downie
The Wedding Shroud - A Tale of Ancient Rome - Elisabeth Storrs
Circle Of Shadows - Imogen Robertson
Flying Too High - Kerry Greenwood
The Blood of The Fifth Knight - E.M. Powell
Theft of Life (Crowther & Westerman 5) by Robertson, Imogen (2014) Paperback - Imogen Robertson
The Girl in the Glass Tower - Elizabeth Fremantle
A Curious Beginning - Deanna Raybourn
A Duty To The Dead - Charles Todd

August turned out to be a great reading month for me. I didn't read a single "bad" book this month. At the beginning of the summer, I started a challenge with the goal of finishing 50 books before the end of August. I only read 29 of my 50 books but I made some great discoveries along the way. 

 

Some of the highlights of the month include:

 

Shinju- This was a welcome introduction to a culture I know very little about. I look forward to continuing this series and seeing how the main character wrestles with his obligation to honor his family and his desire to seek the truth at all costs.

 

The Girl in the Glass Tower- Since her debut novel, Queen's Gambit, Elizabeth Fremantle has found her way on to my list of "day of" authors. These are authors who I think are so wonderful, their books are worth buying the day they are released. Fremantle did not disappoint with her latest work. Arbella Stuart is such a tragic figure. The only knock I have on this book was the use of Ami as a vessel for storytelling. She just didn't work for me. 

 

Bloodlines (Wars of the Roses #3) by Conn Iggulden- This book is not shown on the above list but it needs mentioning. This series just might be the best historical fiction series I have ever read. I am withholding judgement until I read the fourth and final book in the series. 

 

Not-so-much-a-highlight:

 

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child- Another book not listed above that needs mentioning. The Harry Potter book includes some of my favorite books of all time with the series being my favorite series of all time across all genres. Of course I was excited when it was announced there would be more Harry Potter after all this time! I bought this book as soon as Target opened on 7/31. I set myself up to be disappointed. It was a good thing I did. Lowering my expectations helped. I had no problems with the story. I thought the story by itself was another incredible work from J.K. Rowling. My problem was the format. Using the play format to tell a story took something away. Part of the wonder of the Harry Potter world is Rowling's ability to fully immerse the reading into the wizarding world. When you are reading a story that is just strictly dialogue, you loose some of that wonder. 

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review 2016-08-16 00:00
Theft of Life (Crowther & Westerman 5)
Theft of Life (Crowther & Westerman 5) - Imogen Robertson This book brings to mind that old saying "The more things change, the more they stay the same".
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review 2015-05-10 00:00
Instruments of Darkness
Instruments of Darkness - Imogen Robertson I read to page 17 and quit. There were two many parallel plots going on and the writing was pretty dull. I may pick it up again some day but right now I'm reading other, more interesting mysteries so Im going to continue with those for now.
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review 2015-02-10 01:36
The Paris Winter: A Novel - Imogen Robertson

4.5 stars rounded up

 

Particularly impressed with the author's end notes discussing her research and suggestions for further reading on various topics. In my opinion, this is the way historical fiction should be presented. Also love that the idea came from family history.

 

 

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review 2015-01-06 12:08
Narzędzia piekła
Narzędzia piekła - Imogen Robertson

Autorka zabiera nas do niewielkiej, żyjącej w cieniu arystokratycznego dworu, miejscowości. Jest rok 1780, pani Harriet Westerman podczas porannej przechadzki odnajduje na terenie swojej posiadłości zwłoki.
Hrabstwo Sussex, wspaniała, bogata posiadłość Thornleigh Hall skrywająca w swoich murach mroczne tajemnice potężnego, arystokratycznego rodu. Budzący swego czasu postrach wśród okolicznych mieszkańców lord Thornleigh powoli umiera, wyniszczony przez nieubłaganą demencję. Opiekę nad nim sprawuje druga żona, była tancerka i "gwiazda" Londynu. Lord wydziedziczył pierworodnego syna, po którym ślad zaginął, drugi okaleczony syn pije i żyje jak włóczęga, w alkoholu szukając zapomnienia po okropieństwach wojny w Ameryce.
Początkowo nie mogłam się wciągnąć. Czytałam po kilka stron i odkładałam książkę, chociaż nie miałam właściwie do niej zastrzeżeń. Może okoliczności nie sprzyjały. Podchodziłam do niej kilka razy, aż w końcu mnie wciągnęła i w zasadzie nie wiem kiedy ją skończyłam.

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