logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: James-Blish
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-08-08 12:11
Star Trek 1, James Blish
Star Trek 1 - James Blish Star Trek 1 - James Blish

Well, that's it! I've now read every book Blish published.

 

Really not much different from the other ten volumes of adaptations Blish did (don't ask how I ended up reading the first one last - I don't know myself) except for the lack of a foreword. It was the release of this volume that created a deluge of fan mail that Blish would address in his forewords to subsequent volumes.

 

As usual the quality varies with the quality of the adapted original script. Interesting to note that the iconic image of Sulu brandishing a fencing foil has him wearing an undershirt here- he's famously bare chested in the episode. There's another go round for the Shakespeare inspired trope, along with the child with god-like powers.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-08-07 23:27
Reading progress update: I've read 91 out of 136 pages.
Star Trek 1 - James Blish Star Trek 1 - James Blish

Sulu goes crazy with a fencing foil!

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-08-07 00:13
Reading progress update: I've read 23 out of 136 pages.
Star Trek 1 - James Blish Star Trek 1 - James Blish

Here we go again with the morally/emotionally child-like being with  god-like powers. This one actually is a human child. Unfortunately the resolution by way of the "parents" turning up and taking the child in hand also appears, instead of the Enterprise crew figuring a way out of the mess themselves. Why was Original Trek so obsessed with this trope?  TNG kinda had it with Q - those episodes always annoyed me, too.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-06-29 09:14
The trailblazing Star Trek novel
Spock Must Die! (Star Trek Adventures, #1) - James Blish

While engaged in a surveying mission light years from Federation territory, the starship Enterprise receives word that the Organians — the advanced beings who enforce peace between the Federation and the Klingon Empire — have suddenly vanished. As the begin the months-long journey back through Klingon space to investigate, Scotty develops a new version of the transporter, one designed to teleport a person across the galaxy instantaneously. When it is used to send Spock to the Organian homeworld, however, the transport fails, producing two indistinguishable Spocks. Captain Kirk is now faced with the task to deciding which one is the true Spock, and which is the reversed duplicate of his friend who must be destroyed.

 

Such is the premise of James Blish's novel, which is something of a historical artifact. Originally published in 1970, it is the very first original Star Trek novel written for adults, the progenitor of the shelves of novels, novellas, and short story collections that have been published since. In this respect Blish was blazing a trail followed by everyone since, which makes reading it from today's vantage point an interesting experience. Longtime fans will find more than a few idiosyncracies and anachronisms in its pages, while the story's resolution is so overblown as to leave the reader wondering whether Blish seriously believed that it would hold up. Such reactions, though, point as well to the underlying pleasure of the book, which bears virtually none of the weight of the overstuffed franchise and still holds value as a result.

Like Reblog Comment
review 2017-04-18 00:00
Star Trek: The Classic Episodes
Star Trek: The Classic Episodes - James Blish Loved reading these since I missed out on the original episodes. I intend to watching them now.
More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?