logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Jane-Grey
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-05-16 23:09
Arc Review: Jane Grey: A Homage to the Brontë Classics (The Brontë Brothers #1) by Nina Mason
Jane Grey (The Brontë Brothers Book 1) - Nina Mason

 

I’ll start by saying that Jane Eyre happens to be my least favorite classic historical romance. So when offered the chance to read this story I was truly intrigued and couldn’t pass the opportunity to read it.

 

Well, Jane Grey was a great romance story indeed! I don’t want anyone to think it wasn’t based on my rating. I did enjoy it from start to finish, true, however I also did have a few issues with the story itself. At any rate, I still recommend it to any fan of the original and to those looking for a worthwhile happy ending.

 

Matthew and Jane have a lot in common and that’s obviously what drew them together. They were both hopeless romantics to the point they could both recite poems by heart and Matthew was a painter hoping to revive his then-dormant muse.

At the start of the story, Matthew was hurt and vulnerable, thus he gave me the impression of just having fallen in love with the idea of the perfect woman that could possibly be Jane as opposed to the woman herself. As the story progressed and they got to know each other better, his attitude left no doubt in my mind that he had in fact fallen for Jane as a woman so I was happy on that end.

 

Their relationship was endearing and heart-warming. The story was heart-wrenching at times and hopeful at others. The descriptive settings made me feel I was part of the story itself and the writing was as beautiful as ever when it comes to this author.

 

As for Jane, she was sweet and considerate, but to an almost maddening point in my opinion. Most of the time she showed strength of character and common sense but when it came to trusting unworthy people or when it came to continue on the path she had already set her mind to follow she was inconstant and mutable. That whiplash attitude was one of the reasons I couldn’t enjoy the story more.

Also, the story is set in a place where propriety is not as strict as it would have been in England at the time but I still thought Jane didn’t come up to scratch as a governess to some extent. I’m not going to give specific examples because I don’t want to give spoilers but suffice to say her pupil would act incredibly unlady-like and Ms. Gray would just stand there and do nothing. I know, I’ve been told I need to let go of certain things when it comes to historicals but I just can’t!

 

As I said earlier dear reader, it IS a lovely story, full of passion, regrets, ambition, and true love. If this sounds like your cup of tea then I’m sure you are going to love it. 

 

*** I received this book from the author at no cost to me and I volunteered to read it; this is my honest opinion and given without any influence by the author or publisher.***

Like Reblog Comment
review 2016-02-05 00:00
Lady Jane Grey: Nine Days Queen
Lady Jane Grey: Nine Days Queen - Alison Plowden If you love Tudor history, than this book is for you!

Alison Plowden delves into the life of the ill-fated Jane Grey and her family. The not so subtle manipulation of a young woman who had no say in her future, and the tragic events which led to her her death are recounted here in detail.
From the beginning of her life, to her death and beyond, Plowden goes into the family history and the events which surrounded the short reign of the young woman, who had events turned out differently might have left a more favorable impression on history. Instead she has been condemned for taking a crown that was not hers, although the decision was not hers to make. The manipulation of a child king and the protector of the nation who saw more power for himself all lead to one thing - death.

A MUST READ!
Like Reblog Comment
review 2013-06-22 12:11
Book Review: Innocent Traitor by Alison Weir
Innocent Traitor - Alison Weir

This was my first book by Alison Weir and I enjoyed it a lot. As a historian, Weir brings much to the fiction table in this book. She is able to integrate a lot of intricate historical details into the overall story. When historical details are in question, Weir chooses the most believable route to follow creating a vastly interesting historical adventure.

The focus of this book is the Lady Jane Grey and her rise to the throne of England and subsequent downfall 9 days later. Her story is told from just before her birth and the life of her mother and father. She is a smart girl and lives a rather quiet life at her home of Bradgate Hall. Her mother is not the warmest person and does everything she can to advance the family in the hierarchal structure of English society. Her greatest ambition is to bring Jane to the throne, regardless of the manner or the repercussions.

This story is told through the voice of many different narrators; at last count I think there was 8, but it could be a few more than that. I am on the fence as to whether this many narrators are effective or not. Each of these people brings a different perspective of the events of the day to the table. At the same time it can sometimes get confusing as to exactly who these people are and what their purpose is. Some of the narrators appear frequently (Jane and her mother) and some only appear once (Jane Seymour). I have read other books where multiple narrators are employed (The Boleyn Inheritanceby Philippa Gregory) but the number has been limited to a few. I think this was more effective because you can really make a connection with the characters and understand their importance.

The character of Jane Grey is exceptionally well written. I had no previous experience with the story of Jane Grey and I have to say that I learned a lot. There were times that my heartstrings were pulled. The author really knows how to create an emotional scene.

I would highly recommend this book to anyone interested in the reign of Lady Jane Grey as well as politics of the time period.

While Alison Weir primarily writes non-fiction, she also has written several other historical novels such as: The Lady ElizabethThe Captive Queen, and A Dangerous Inheritance

 

      

 

This review is of a book from my personal collection and is based solely on my reading pleasure.  Review originally posted at The Maiden's Court on June 20, 2009.

 

Source: themaidenscourt.blogspot.com/2009/06/book-review-innocent-traitor.html
Like Reblog Comment
review 2013-05-21 00:00
Innocent Traitor - Alison Weir weir and plaidy do not rock my world anymore - the time has passed
Like Reblog Comment
review 2013-03-04 00:00
Lady Jane Grey - Eric Ives This was a fascinating insight into the life of one of the most enigmatic members of Tudor England. It was well researched and was informative without being dry.Because there is so little information that we have on Jane Grey, it was great that he added perspectives of what happened from Edward VI to Mary I to even the Seymours.
More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?