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review 2018-09-18 20:05
A year later...
Furiously Happy: A Funny Book About Horrible Things - Jenny Lawson

So according to BL, I started reading this December 16, 2017. That means it took me 9 months to finish this wonderful book. Since Jenny Lawson discusses her struggle with depression and anxiety disorders at length (in the best, funniest way possible) I had to take several long breaks when my anxiety and depression were not putting me in the right head space to enjoy reading it. But really, this book is hilarious and just what I needed during these past two weeks of total chaos in my life. 

 

I am not exaggerating when I say my "vacation" was surrounded with nothing but Murphy's law. Car accident, cancelled concerts, delayed flights, stomach flu, etc, etc. All unrelated to this review, but whatever, I'll do what I want. Furiously Happy does remind us to laugh at the absurdity of our lives and most of all, to remember that the lows eventually get better. 

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review 2018-08-17 02:42
Review: Let's Pretend This Never Happened
Let's Pretend This Never Happened (A Mostly True Memoir) - Jenny Lawson

Imagine if you will a guy who works at a library. He enjoys reading. He loves the scent and feel of books. He mostly reads literature, but he's not a snob. Okay, he's a snob, but he'll try something slightly out of his comfort zone. One day, one of his coworkers says to him, “Would you be interested in leading one of our book groups? I'm thinking of passing it on.” “Sure,” he says. Here's a chance to get paid just talking about a book every other month. He's all ready. He's going to be a great leader. The books are all planned out through January of the following year. His first meeting will be in August. He looks at the schedule to see what inspirational and brilliant work of literature they're going to read in August. Oh boy, he thinks. How am I ever going to explain this to my friends on social media?

The preceding story is true. I'm sure, because it happened to me. Let's Pretend This Never Happened purports to be a true story, but I really doubt most of it. The other difference between Lawson and Blocker: Jenny Lawson is apparently hysterical. I am not. Except, I don't think Lawson is funny. Not. One. Bit. Like, you may not believe me, but I didn't laugh once. Not once. I didn't even smile. As I neared the end of the book, I actually forced a smile, thinking that maybe the physical action would help me find the humor. It didn't work. There were a few times when I thought, oh, that was wee bit witty. But only a wee bit. And not even then, I was just trying really hard to find the positive.

I'm truly, honestly really glad that people love this book. Because they do love it. I'm glad people can laugh until they can no longer breathe (assuming it's temporary). I want people to be happy and apparently Let's Pretend This Never Happened makes them really happy. I don't get it. It's not that I'm completely incapable of humor. It's difficult to get a laugh out of me, but I do find some things funny, things that no one else finds funny. I'm entitled to my own brand of humor, but I do wonder if part of my distaste is that Lawson, her mania, her mood swings, and her ridiculous stories remind me of a girl I once dated. I lived the “mostly true,” but not true stories for several years and let me tell you, it's exhausting and, over time, it's no longer the least bit funny. I'm glad that Lawson found a way to turn her mania into something she can be successful with and that so many people can enjoy. I'm glad she didn't choose a more destructive path. But reading this makes me manic. And that's not a good thing for any of us.

So I hated Let's Pretend This Never Happened. There's one reason to read this book, and that's because of the humor. If you don't find it funny, there really isn't a point to it, is there? I didn't find it the least bit funny. I went to book club knowing that someone else would agree. Since it was my first time leading the group, I didn't want to sway anyone. I'd wait for someone to mention how the book really wasn't funny, then I'd pounce. Surely, someone would say it. No one did. They all thought it was hysterical—a nice change of pace. So I smiled, nodded my head, and mostly remained quiet. I asked a few questions that I hoped would elicit some underlying disdain, but no, they genuinely loved it.

So again, I'm glad everyone else in the world is wildly entertained with this “memoir.” It just wasn't for me. And if ever I'm asked to read a book like this again, I'll know I can just fake it by saying, “oh yeah, that was hilarious.”

Let's just pretend that this never happened.

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review 2018-05-09 02:20
Let's Pretend This Never Happened (A Mostly True Memoir)
Let's Pretend This Never Happened (A Mostly True Memoir) - Jenny Lawson

Sometimes you want to forget very embarrassing things that happen in your life and a few of those times you’ll ask your friends to pretend it didn’t happen, now think about that being the majority of your life.  Jenny Lawson, aka “The Bloggess”, recounts her life from childhood through school, romance, marriage, and motherhood in her first book, Let’s Pretend This Never Happened: A Mostly True Memoir.

 

Lawson starts off the book by throwing the reader into the deep end of her humor and really doesn’t let them resurface until after finishing the book.  Beginning with her childhood in Wall, Texas, Lawson goes through her quirky life from one embarrassing moment to another especially since her own father was a quirky taxidermist whose business was in the backyard AND that was before she even started school.  Misadventures in high school—mainly dealing with a cow—and college follow, and it is in the latter where she meets her husband in which the most hilarious moments of her life begin.  And through her marriage with Victor, the birth of their daughter, and move out into Texas countryside the misadventures only continue with predictably hilarious, yet embarrassing results.

 

It’s hard to really evaluate a humorous memoir, except grading it on the content of its own humor.  Honestly, given how much I looked forward to reading this book each day and the fact I had to stop reading out of either laughing or just being embarrassed at the author’s own embarrassing situations means it succeeded.  Yet on top of that is Lawson’s faux notes from her editor(s) just add to the overall experience of the book.  And the added bonus chapter of the paperback of notes from her promotional tour is a cherry on top of everything.

 

Let’s Pretend This Never Happened is a hilarious memoir of a woman who owns up to her embarrassing moments, cherishes them, and knows they made her who she is.  Though this wasn’t the first book by Jenny Lawson that I’ve read, yet now I can see why it became a bestseller and has led to a few more books by Lawson.

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review 2018-05-06 00:37
Furiously Happy: A Funny Book About Horrible Things - Jenny Lawson

For more reviews, check out my blog: Craft-Cycle

As Lawson clearly states in the beginning of this book, if you don't like funny books about mental illness, do not read this book. Pretty simple. If you are looking for a serious discussion on mental health and how to "fix" yourself, look elsewhere. This is not that book.

Now onto what this book actually is. This book is hilarious. Everything about it is so absurd and ridiculous. It is extremely funny and very entertaining. From arguments with her husband to weird childhood stories, Lawson takes the reader on a side-slitting journey to learn how she became furiously happy (and you can too!). 

Mixed into the hilarity are real discussions about her own mental health and serious talks about feeling alone, self harm, thoughts of suicide, and other dark times. But Lawson does something amazing with this. She makes people feel less alone. It's nice to see that other people feel that way too and, though her work, Lawson has created a sort of community of those struggling with mental illness. It's a fun sort of group that makes the world a little brighter. So even though this book is funny, she does get serious about certain things and makes the reader feel welcome, flaws and all. 

Lawson's humor is pretty intelligent. She starts off with something true, then twists the logic and semantics around in such a ridiculous way to end up with a crazy conclusion that actually makes a weird sort of deluded sense. It is highly entertaining and actually pretty impressive. Each chapter has a super weird title and it's almost like a scavenger hunt or a Where's Waldo page figuring out what the title refers to. When you get to the part in the chapter where the title comes from, you're like, "Aha! That makes a weird sort of sense." It makes for a very fun reading experience.

I didn't read Lawson's first book, but after reading this one, I'd like to go back and read it at some point. 

While I didn't necessarily agree with everything Lawson says and there are some offensive statements and jokes in the text, it is overall a funny story that is all about being true to yourself, saying "yes" to trying new things, and being furiously happy. 

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text 2018-01-15 09:24
et's Pretend This Never Happened byJenny Lawson $1.99
Let's Pretend This Never Happened: A Mostly True Memoir - Jenny Lawson

When Jenny Lawson was little, all she ever wanted was to fit in. That dream was cut short by her fantastically unbalanced father and a morbidly eccentric childhood. It did, however, open up an opportunity for Lawson to find the humor in the strange shame-spiral that is her life, and we are all the better for it.

In the irreverent Let’s Pretend This Never Happened, Lawson’s long-suffering husband and sweet daughter help her uncover the surprising discovery that the most terribly human moments—the ones we want to pretend never happened—are the very same moments that make us the people we are today. For every intellectual misfit who thought they were the only ones to think the things that Lawson dares to say out loud, this is a poignant and hysterical look at the dark, disturbing, yet wonderful moments of our lives. 

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