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review 2018-07-13 16:49
A teen romance... sort of
Turtles All the Way Down - John Green

A girl Aza who has spiral thinking and germaphobic want to get out of her head. She has a best friend who write fan fiction of Star Wars Wookiee Chewbacca.

 

The story starts with a rich man was on the run from the police. The police has a ten thousands dollars reward for clue to find him.

 

Aza knew he man's son Davis. So they pretend to be just happened to be in the area and trying to clue to find the man and get the reward at first. Of course, that's not what they got. Aza starts dating Davis. 

 

The story is kind of sweet as it is into poetry and fan fictions and girl being depressed and couldn't help herself or get away from her though.

 

That's the good part. Even though it is a lot of grey it is still a good read. All John Green's fans would not be disappointed. 

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review 2018-07-04 19:31
Looking for Alaska / John Green
Looking for Alaska - John Green

Before: Miles “Pudge” Halter is done with his safe life at home. His whole life has been one big non-event, and his obsession with famous last words has only made him crave “the Great Perhaps” even more (Francois Rabelais, poet). He heads off to the sometimes crazy and anything-but-boring world of Culver Creek Boarding School, and his life becomes the opposite of safe. Because down the hall is Alaska Young. The gorgeous, clever, funny, sexy, self-destructive, screwed up, and utterly fascinating Alaska Young. She is an event unto herself. She pulls Pudge into her world, launches him into the Great Perhaps, and steals his heart. Then. . . .
After: Nothing is ever the same.

 

This is my first foray into John Green’s writing, undertaken for my real life book club during our year of reading young adult literature. It seemed appropriate to include one of Green’s books, since he is sometimes credited “with ushering in a new golden era for contemporary, realistic, literary teen fiction, following more than a decade of dominance by books about young wizards, sparkly vampires, and dystopia.” (Wikipedia).

Looking for Alaska is his first published novel. One of the things that I did appreciate about it was its male narrator, Miles “Pudge” Halter. A story of a young man, written by a male author, something that we could use more of in the world of YA. One presumes that Green, having been an adolescent boy, would bring his experience to the novel and that seemed to me to be the case. Of course, my only way of judging is from comparison to my long-ago experience of being a teen girl.

I also appreciated the strong character of Alaska Young, the young woman who provides the lynch-pin of Halter’s boarding school life. She is intelligent (coaching the boys in mathematics) and a reader with a large collection of books in her room. But she is also cool, smoking & drinking & presumably sexually active (we readers only see the first two activities). She challenges the boys regularly on matters of female objectification and patriarchy. But she has a boyfriend outside of the boarding school, which makes her off-limits as a potential girlfriend to the boys—nevertheless, they all fall for the beautiful Alaska and hope to be the one to catch her fancy should she break up with Jake.

I liked all those features—so why only 3 stars? Because I felt really emotionally manipulated during my reading. My first few tears were shed in the coffee room at work, and I decided to finish up the book at home rather than cry in the workplace. For my money, Patrick Ness does a much better job at writing a YA book on grief in A Monster Calls. I cried over that one too, but it felt a bit more honest to me somehow.

Mind you, I would never discourage anyone from reading Looking for Alaska. I consider 3 stars to be a pretty good rating and I’m sure that younger readers would rate the novel higher than I do. And it certainly provides the young male viewpoint that is needed to attract young men into the world of reading.

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review 2018-05-12 18:50
The Fault in Our Stars - John Green

Hazel has lung cancer and is forced by her mother to go to a support group each week. While there, she meats someone named Gus Waters who makes Hazel forget all about the negative things in her life. However, things don't end up great for Hazel and Gus in this heartbreaking ending.

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review 2018-05-09 16:23
The Fault in Our Stars - John Green

I LOVE this book.  John Green is an amazing writer.  I say this about a lot of books, but the characters are so memorable and unique!  While the ending did make me cry, I think it was realistic and necessary. This book gives you an interesting outlook on life.  READ IT!!!

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review 2018-04-25 05:23
A Review of Turtles All the Way Down by John Green
Turtles All the Way Down - John Green

I found this book very hard to rate. Even now, I can’t fully decide if I liked it or if I didn’t. Now, don’t get me wrong… this wasn’t a bad book at all. Green’s style of writing for this novel is beautiful. I can’t tell you if that’s how he writes all of his novel’s, because this was my first. Nonetheless, it was beautiful and I thoroughly enjoyed it. There were certain paragraphs that I kept re-reading because they were filled with meaningful quotes that I loved. Though I didn’t care much for Aza, Green did an amazing job portraying her mental illness. I’m positive that many people out there were able to relate and connect with her on a deeper level. I, however, wasn’t able to make that connection with her. I guess it was because that’s all she was to me, just a girl with a mental illness. I didn’t get to know anything else about her to really draw me to her.  

In conclusion, no, this was not the book for me. Will I read another of John Green’s novels? Most likely, as I didn’t HATE this one. Would I recommend this book to other’s? I would. After all, no two persons ever read the same book.

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