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Search tags: Kelly-Thompson
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review 2017-10-06 18:16
Pink Ranger no more - and Kimberly's solo
Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: Pink #1 (of 6) - Brenden Fletcher,Kelly Thompson,Daniele Di Nicuolo

I'm not even sure what happened.   All I know is that she's one of my least favorite rangers - sorry?  Or I'm not? - but this had a color your own cover version, so, bam, snagged it. 

 

It's actually more fun, and made me care far more for the character; Kimberly, on her own, without her ranger powers, has to save her mother, father, and the town they're now living in - in France *swoon, yeah, that helped* - which has been apparently overrun by monsters. 

 

I found her less annoying on her own, and de-powered.   Also more down to Earth: she was taking care of herself, and doing her best not to worry about her friends, and former superhero partners, while also caring about what happened to everyone in this town. 

 

Fun, and I might just check out the rest of the series eventually.   When I have more time than I do now.

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review 2017-05-20 13:01
Good message, told in forced dialogues
Constance & Nano: Engineering Adventure #1 - Kelly Thompson,Nicoletta Baldari

So, I really kinda love this comic.   It's about Constance, a girl who lives in a town where flooding happens more and more often.   This flooding is a great cause for concern: her friend got hit by a car when the street he used to get to school was flooded, and Constance herself almost gets hit until she's saved by the local superhero, Nano.   When she asks her teacher why the street gets flooded, he sets up a meeting between the girl and his friend - a woman - who's an engineer.   Constance not only learns about what's happened, and what's being done to fix this problem, but she also learns about Nano's secret identity and figures out why her mom's garden is flooding.   She uses her newfound knowledge about engineering to fix the garden problem, because she can, and she knows the town is working on fixing the bridge.   This comic is put out by the Society of Women Engineers (or SWE) and it's a great message: women are engineers, and if we want more women engineers, we should foster that curiosity young.   (I'm also glad that this doesn't skew only to women engineers.   That is obviously the focus, but you see women and men working together when there are panels showing what the engineers are doing - like surveying - to start to tackle this problem.   It's subtle, but the message is there: men and women are working together to fix this.)

 

Everything, from Nano's identity to the big problem of the flooding of the town to the relatively smaller problem of the garden flooding are dealt with and wrapped up, as much as they can be in this short comic.   (Solutions are presented, but the changes don't happen immediately, because realistically it just won't be fixed with the snap of a finger.   Nano says she trusts Constance to keep her secret, which seems weird since they just met and Nano doesn't have any real basis for believing that a young child would have the necessary willpower to keep this secret.)

 

If only the dialogue didn't feel so stilted and forced.  I understand: the message was the points and it came on so strongly.   Which again is a great message, encouraging and empowering girls to learn about engineering.  But the message overtook any plot, any natural dialogue, and I kind of cringed at this fact.   Still, the importance of the message really overtook any reservations I had.     I'll take it, stilted dialogue and all.   

 

The art is bright, highly stylized and just excellent.  Adorable, very cartoonish, this fit the message, and the people this message was intended for, so very appropriate here.   Love, love, love the art.   

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review 2017-03-15 23:36
Love, love, love!
Hawkeye (2016-) #1 - Kelly Thompson,Leonardo Romero,Julian Tedesco

Kate Bishop, aka Hawkeye, wants to start up her own PI business.   She doesn't have the license yet, but she was once an Avenger.   Her sign might be a HAWK and a hand drawn eye under it - which makes people either looking for the "real" - read male - Hawkeye or an optometrist.   

 

She isn't going to let that stop her, either, so when someone with an actual case comes looking for her, well, Kate eagerly takes on the case.   A college student is being stalked, and her harasser's messages are getting more and more threatening.   She also suspects this big jerk-bag might know her, which is freaking her out, too.   

 

This is far more adorable than what I'd expected.  That being said, I also got this through Marvel Insider: it's a system in which you get points for things you do.   You can redeem these points for something like codes to digital comics, or subscriptions to MU+.  (The points do expire, after a year, I believe.   You need 750,000 points for the MU+, and you get 50 points for visiting Marvel, and 250-500 points for most everything else.  I gave up on the MU+, and will keep paying for it, if I decide to do that much longer.  I may not have the time soon...)

 

This was 20,000 points, and well worth it.   My points were going to start expiring soon, anyway, and I like having this in my library instead of something I don't own since I'm getting it for free anyway!

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review 2016-12-01 02:33
Ooooh!
A-Force (2016-) #6 - Kelly Thompson,Ben Caldwell

I'm coming in the middle of this, but for a fairly good reason: grab bag.   I'm still indulging in those, yes, but mostly only Marvel.   I get digital copies, as well, at a ridiculously low price and I end up enjoying most of what I get in the bags. 

 

Yay!

 

This was no exception.  It was pretty funny.   It was also pretty tense: A-Force is down a couple members, unsure if Singularity is dead and pretty sure Nico Minoru is working against them.   Nico is being mind-controlled by The Countess, though, so they can't really blame her.   Or the rest of A-Force doesn't. 

 

They try to help her break free of the mind-control so they can, well, break free of the more literal prison they are currently being held in, thanks to other mind-controlled minions of The Countess. 

 

I've got to admit, I pretty much love this series because it lacks the male ego that many comic books do.   It's all women, al the time, and they're funny, smart, and brave.  Don't get me wrong: I love my male-ego drenched characters, and the series that revolve around them.   Uncanny Inhumans - which I'm afraid is coming to an end, although I can't see proof of this.   I'm mostly worried because I read this huuuuuge spoiler on Marvel while looking for news of the Inhumans series in IMAX.  (I will post the spoiler after a page break for those interested at the end of this review.)

 

But now and again it's nice to have an all woman series, or even just issues in between.   I'm not talking about the issues that revolve around men or have women leaning on men's shoulders.  All.   Women.   

 

Men  do show up.  There's a couple dudes in the mobs that are trying to take down A-Force, but they barely have any lines and are vaguely menacing although not more so than the mind-controlled women.   It's the women who band together, banter, and act to save themselves and those controlled by The Countess. 

 

And it's nice.   It's a nice break, and it's nice to see the women shine while shrugging off the attitude that they need men in their life.   I think it's nice to have them around sometimes, but I don't need them around.  What I need is a good story and good art.   (I didn't like the art that much at first but I came around by the end because I was quickly charmed by it all.)

 

This gave me all that, and focused on women, without sexualizing them or using them as props.   It was all about them.   It was all about them being heroes, being strong and brave and sassy.   It was about them being who they were.   

 

It was nice.   I think I need to read more A-Force.

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review 2016-09-22 15:34
Lumberjanes 2016: Making The Ghost of it
Lumberjanes: 2016 Special: Makin' the Ghost of It - Savanna Ganucheau,Kelly Thompson,Jen Wang,Christine Norrie

4 Stars, Buy it

 

This is a different artist and I really like the art work. This artist feminized the women alittle and I think it’s pretty. That was for the first story. I’d give that story 5 stars.  The second story I don’t like the art as much, the art is done by yet another person and the people look cartoonish and weird but not terrible. The second story I’d give 3 stars. So overall 4 stars. Still a great series. I might need to take a break from Lumberjanes though.

 

Description (From Amazon): What’s to Love: Not only does this oversized one-shot feature a whopping 40 pages of brand-new, original, Lumberjanes stories, but we welcome two of our favorite creators to the campground: writers Jen Wang (In Real Life, 2017’s The Prince and the Dressmaker) and Kelly Thompson (Jem and the Holograms), and artists Christine Norrie (Hopeless Savages) and Savanna Ganucheau (Fresh Romance)! What It Is: Jen takes the girls on a nature walk to show them which plants are edible in case they need to survive in the wilderness. Along the way, she tells them the story about an axe murderer who took his friends out, one by one until no one was left, thoroughly scaring Mal. Terrified and unable to sleep, Mal thinks she sees something lurking outside. Is it...THE AXE MURDERER?!?!







April- Short red head girl

Jen- dark skinned camp counselor

Jo- tall kid

Mal: Dark haired girl with half shaved head

Molly: Blond haired girl

Ripley: Short brunet with headband around her head and blue streak in hair

Rosie- head of camp. Constantly calls Jen Jane. Very cool.

Diane- girl from another cabin at the camp, black hair Apparently the sister of Jo.

Bubbles- Molly’s raccoon hat who happens to be a live raccoon

Barney- Boy from boys camp that they run into a lot

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