logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Less-Than-Three-Press
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
text 2021-05-13 13:01
Cover Reveal - Good Faith

 

 

Title: Good Faith (Stewart Realty, #8)

Author: Liz Crowe

Genre: Family Saga, Fiction

Release Date: June 8, 2021

Cover Designer: Buoni Amici Press

Publisher: Buoni Amici Press

Hosted by: Buoni Amici Press, LLC.

 

 

 

Brandis Gordon struggles to maintain control as he ricochets between wild success and miserable failure as an energetic boy, an athletic teen, and young adult, proving time and again how even the strongest relationships can be strangled by the ties that bind.

Blair Freitag spent her entire life in close contact with her family’s friends, the Gordons. But when her obsession with the boy who at one time was nothing but a teasing nuisance, blossoms into a strength of will that Brandis comes to depend on a little too much, all bets are off.

 

A chronicle of three families navigating teen years minefields, into the turbulence of young adulthood, Good Faith holds up a mirror to contemporary life, unflinchingly reflecting life’s joys and temptations. Somewhere between the tangle of good memories and bad, independence and addiction, optimism and despair, the intertwined destinies of the new Stewart Realty generation collide, leaving some stronger, others broken, but none unscathed.

AMAZON

Tweet: Check out the #CoverReveal for Book 8 in the Stewart Realty Series, Good Faith By @ElizabethTCrowe HERE>> https://ctt.ec/0X9o1+ ‎ #Preorder your copy @Amazon https://ctt.ec/nq7ZX+ the Series https://ctt.ec/R24Yd+ #BAPpr #Fiction #FamilySaga

 

 

 

 

Liz Crowe is a Kentucky native and graduate of the University of Louisville living in Central Illinois. She's spent her time as a three-continent expat trailing spouse, mom of three, real estate agent, brewery owner and bar manager, and is currently a social media consultant and humane society development director, in addition to being an award-winning author. With stories set in the not-so-common worlds of breweries, on the soccer pitch, inside fictional television stations and successful real estate offices, and even in exotic locales like Istanbul, Turkey, her books are compelling and told with a fresh voice. The Liz Crowe backlist has something for any reader seeking complex storylines with humor and complete casts of characters that will delight, at times frustrate, and always linger in the imagination long after the book is finished.

 

Start the series by reading books 1-7

AMAZON | AppleBooks | Nook | Kobo

 

 

Like Reblog Comment
text 2021-04-22 13:15
★BOOK BLITZ★ The Dating Series

 

Title: The Dating Series 

Author: Heidi McLaughlin & LP Dover 

Genre: Contemporary Romance 

Event Date: April 22, 2020 

Cover Designer: MadHat Studios 

Hosted by: Buoni Amici Press, LLC.

 

New York Times and USA Today bestselling authors Heidi McLaughlin and L.P. Dover come together for a sexy new series that delivers romance for every season!

 

Get ready for that kiss at MIDNIGHT.

Fall in love with your ADMIRER.

Sneak a tryst with the leprechaun for GOOD LUCK.

Be the first to find the golden egg on the HUNT.

Hold on tight for the DERBY. It’ll be a crazy ride.

Enjoy a little FOREplay on the golf course.

The kitchen is getting hot in FOODIE.

It’s time to get a little sticky at the FAIR.

The ship is going to be rocking at the REGATTA.

Hide who you are and discover what you want in MASQUERADE.

Indulge in the perfect spread. It’s time to get stuffed in TURKEY.

More than jingle bells will be rocking when you date an ELF.

 

Purchase Your Copy Today!!

Kindle Unlimited

AMAZON

Tweet: New York Times and USA Today bestselling authors Heidi McLaughlin and L.P. Dover come together for a sexy new series that delivers romance for every season! The Dating Series is now available in #KU https://ctt.ec/eHSay+ #KUReads

About Heidi:

 

Heidi McLaughlin is a New York Times and USA Today Bestselling author of The Beaumont Series, The Boys of Summer, and The Archers. Originally, from the Pacific Northwest, she now lives in picturesque Vermont, with her husband and two daughters. Also renting space in their home is an over-hyper Beagle/Jack Russell, Buttercup and a Highland West/Mini Schnauzer, JiLL and her brother, Racicot. When she's isn't writing one of the many stories planned for release, you'll find her sitting court-side during either daughter's basketball games. Heidi's first novel, Forever My Girl, has been adapted into a motion picture with LD Entertainment and Roadside Attractions, starring Alex Roe and Jessica Roth, in theaters January 19, 2018.

 

 

To stay connected with Heidi visit www.facebook.com/authorheidimclaughlin or heidimclaughlin.com

 

GOODREADS GROUP | BOOKBUB

GETHEIDISBOOKS to (833) 926-1009

 

About L.P. Dover:

 

New York Times and USA Today bestselling author L. P. Dover is a southern belle living in North Carolina with her husband and two beautiful girls. Everything’s sweeter in the South has always been her mantra and she lives by it, whether it’s with her writing or in her everyday life. Maybe that’s why she’s seriously addicted to chocolate.

Dover has written countless novels in several different genres, including a children’s book with her daughter. Her favorite to write is romantic suspense, but she’s also found a passion in romantic comedy. She loves to make people laugh which is why you’ll never see her without a smile on her face.

| BOOKBUB |

 

 

 

 

Like Reblog Comment
text 2021-01-06 10:56
What Is Espresso Roast?

The espresso drink as we know it today, dates back to 1947, when Gaggia presented the first equipment capable of creating consistent high pressure during the shot pulling. The equipment was called Gaggia Crema Caffe and was intended for normal commercial usage. Prior To the Gaggia Crema Caffe nearly every commercial and consumer espresso device was steam driven, similar to the modern day moka pot maker.

The story appeared originally here - What Makes Espresso Special

Espresso is a rich, concentrated coffee beverage. The common serving, a shot, is made by pushing pressurized hot water through finely ground coffee beans.

Espresso has a thicker consistency than coffee prepared by other brewing techniques. It has a higher concentration of suspended and dissolved solids and crema.

Espresso has all of the same aromas of coffee but intensified-- bitter, mildly sweet, acidic, toasty. The precise aroma account will differ depending on the coffee roast. It has a thicker, creamier consistency than coffee.

Espresso isn't a type of coffee bean, although roasting houses may have a special procedure for beans destined to become espresso. Roasters might favor to work with high-quality robusta beans to incorporate an added kick of caffeine.

Espresso or Expresso-- Use the Right Name

The spelling expresso is generally considered inaccurate, though some sources call it a less frequent version. Italy utilizes the term espresso, substituting s for many x letters in Latin-root words; x is not part of the standard Italian alphabet. Italian individuals commonly describe it just as caffè (coffee), espresso being the ordinary coffee to order; in Spain, while café expreso is viewed as the more "official" religion, coffee shop solo (alone, without milk) is the common means to ask for it when at an espresso bar.

Espresso Preparation

Espresso is prepared by pushing hot water through a layer of compressed ground coffee, had in a port-filter. Espresso is a really concentrated coffee, with a lot of aroma, aroma, and body. It has a great deal of coffee oils and solids. One of the most distinguishing characteristics of espresso are the sudsy layer ahead and the reduced volume of the beverage. Pulling a shot of espresso requires training and understanding, have a look at our espresso brewing overview, for an extensive tutorial.

The preparation of espresso is what actually sets it apart when it comes down to it. Because they depend on the slow filtering of hot water through the grounds, other methods of brewing take time. This indicates more minutes in between you and a fresh cup of coffee.

Espresso machines pressurize and push near-boiling water through finely-ground coffee beans packed into a coffee puck. This method gives you a complex, aromatic, and caffeine-packed shot of coffee in under thirty secs.

When brewed appropriately, the espresso under the crema will have an unique, rich taste, silky mouthfeel, and aromatic fragrance. The shorter period of water exposure extracts less acid than various other preparation techniques while still retaining 60% to 70% of the caffeine in the last mug.

Even though espresso takes just 30 seconds to prepare, it still provides a significant quantity of caffeine. The procedure also preserves a lot more aromatic and subtle coffee oils that you won't find in your normal cup of coffee.

Caffeine Content in Espresso Coffee

While espresso has the reputation of being high in caffeine, it all depends on just how much you drink. Since the drink tends to be served in smaller portions than coffee, it can sometimes end up having less caffeine than standard, brewed coffee. Triple and double shot beverages and mixed drinks like red-eyes can up the caffeine level substantially.

Espresso contains 29 to 100 milligrams of caffeine in a single shot, commonly hovering around 75 milligrams. A double shot has 58 to 185 mg. For contrast, a mug of drip coffee can have 80 to 200 mg of caffeine depending on the variety and preparation method.

Espresso has all of the same aromas of coffee but magnified-- bitter, mildly sweet, acidic, toasty. Italian individuals typically refer to it just as caffè (coffee), espresso being the ordinary coffee to order; in Spain, while café expreso is seen as the more "official" term, café solo (alone, without milk ) is the normal way to ask for it when at an espresso bar.

Espresso is prepared by forcing hot water through a layer of compressed ground coffee, contained in a port-filter. Espresso is an extremely strong coffee, with a lot of aroma, aroma, and body. Pulling a shot of espresso calls for training and understanding, take a look at our espresso brewing guide, for a comprehensive tutorial.

Like Reblog Comment
text 2021-01-06 10:53
Espresso or Expresso – How o We Say It?

The espresso beverage as we know it today, goes back to 1947, when Gaggia introduced the original device capable of producing consistent high pressure throughout the shot pulling. The machine was called Gaggia Crema Caffe and was meant for typical commercial use. Before the Gaggia Crema Caffe practically every commercial and customer espresso device was steam driven, comparable to the modern moka pot maker.

Full story here - What Makes Espresso Special

Espresso is a delicious, strong coffee drink. The standard offering, a shot, is brewed by pushing pressurized hot water through finely ground coffee beans.

Espresso has a thicker consistency than coffee prepared by various other brewing methods. It has a higher concentration of suspended and dissolved solids and crema.

Espresso has all of the same flavors of coffee but magnified-- bitter, mildly sweet, acidic, toasty. The specific flavor profile will vary depending on the coffee roast. It has a thicker, creamier appearance than coffee.

Espresso isn't an unique coffee bean, although roasters may have an unique procedure for beans destined to become espresso. Roasters might choose to utilize premium robusta beans to add an added kick of caffeine.

Espresso or Expresso-- Work With the Right Name

The spelling expresso is normally considered inaccurate, though some sources refer to it as a less frequent version. Italy works with the term espresso, replacing s for the majority of x letters in Latin-root words; x is not part of the common Italian alphabet. Italian individuals commonly refer to it simply as caffè (coffee), espresso being the regular coffee to buy; in Spain, while café expreso is seen as the more "official" denomination, coffee shop solo (alone, without milk) is the normal method to ask for it when at an espresso bar.

Espresso Brewing

Espresso is prepared by pressing hot water through a layer of compressed ground coffee, had in a port-filter. Pulling a shot of espresso calls for training and knowledge, take a look at our espresso brewing guide, for a detailed tutorial.

When it boils down to it, the preparation of espresso is what really sets it apart. Since they rely on the slow filtering of hot water through the grounds, other methods of brewing take time. This suggests several minutes in between you and a fresh mug of coffee.

Espresso devices pressurize and push near-boiling water through finely-ground coffee beans loaded into cakes. This method gives you a complex, aromatic, and caffeine-packed shot of coffee in under thirty secs.

When made properly, the actual espresso under the crema will have a special, rich taste, silky mouthfeel, and aromatic fragrance. The shorter period of water exposure draws out less acid than other brewing methods while still keeping 60% to 70% of the caffeine in the final cup.

Even though espresso takes just 30 seconds to prepare, it still provides a considerable amount of caffeine. The process also preserves more aromatic and volatile coffee oils that you won't find in your standard cup of coffee.

Caffeine Content in an Espresso Shot

While espresso has the reputation of being high in caffeine, it all depends on how much you drink. Because the beverage tends to be served in smaller portions than drip coffee, it can sometimes wind up having less caffeine than common, made coffee. Triple and double shot drinks and mixed drinks like red-eyes can up the caffeine level considerably.

Espresso contains 29 to 100 milligrams of caffeine in a single shot, typically hovering around 75 milligrams. A double shot has 58 to 185 mg. For contrast, a cup of drip coffee can have 80 to 200 mg of caffeine depending on the origin of the beans and preparation technique.

Espresso has all of the same flavors of coffee yet amplified-- bitter, lightly sweet, acidic, toasty. Italian people commonly refer to it merely as caffè (coffee), espresso being the common coffee to order; in Spain, while café expreso is seen as the a lot more "formal" denomination, café solo (alone, without milk ) is the typical way to ask for it when at an espresso bar.

Espresso is prepared by forcing hot water through a layer of compressed ground coffee, had in a port-filter. Espresso is an extremely concentrated coffee, with a lot of aroma, body, and aroma. Pulling a shot of espresso requires training and expertise, take a look at our espresso brewing guide, for a detailed tutorial.

Like Reblog Comment
text 2021-01-06 10:51
All about Espresso, Espresso Roast and Espresso Beans

The espresso drink as we know it today, goes back to 1947, when Gaggia introduced the original machine capable of developing constant high pressure throughout the shot pulling. The device was called Gaggia Crema Caffe and was intended for normal business usage. Prior To the Gaggia Crema Caffe virtually every commercial and consumer espresso equipment was vapor driven, comparable to the modern moka pot brewer.

The article appeared originally here - What Makes Espresso Special

Espresso is a flavorful, concentrated coffee drink. The common offering, a shot, is made by pushing pressurized hot water through finely ground coffee beans.

Espresso has a thicker consistency than coffee prepared by other brewing techniques. It has a higher concentration of suspended and dissolved solids and crema.

Espresso has all of the same aromas of coffee but enhanced-- bitter, lightly sweet, acidic, toasty. The exact aroma profile will vary depending on the coffee roast. It has a thicker, creamier consistency than drip coffee.

Espresso isn't an unique coffee bean, although roasting houses might have an unique procedure for beans destined to become espresso. Roasters may like to use high-grade robusta beans to add an extra kick of caffeine.

Espresso or Expresso-- Use the Right Name

The spelling expresso is mostly considered incorrect, though some sources refer to it as a less frequent variation. Italy uses the term espresso, replacing s for the majority of x letters in Latin-root words; x is not part of the standard Italian alphabet. Italian people commonly refer to it merely as caffè (coffee), espresso being the regular coffee to order; in Spain, while café expreso is seen as the a lot more "official" denomination, café solo (alone, without milk) is the typical means to ask for it when at an espresso bar.

Espresso Extraction

Espresso is prepared by pushing hot water through a layer of compressed ground coffee, contained in a port-filter. Pulling a shot of espresso requires training and expertise, take a look at our espresso brewing overview, for a thorough tutorial.

When it comes down to it, the preparation of espresso is what really sets it apart. Other methods of brewing take some time since they rely on the slow filtering of hot water through your coffee grounds. This implies several minutes between you and a fresh mug of coffee.

Espresso equipments pressurize and push near-boiling water through finely-ground coffee beans loaded into a coffee cake. This technique gives you a complex, aromatic, and caffeine-packed shot of coffee in under thirty seconds.

When brewed properly, the actual espresso under the crema will have a special, rich preference, velvety mouthfeel, and aromatic scent. The shorter duration of water exposure draws out less acid than various other preparation techniques while still keeping 60% to 70% of the caffeine in the final mug.

Also though espresso takes just 30 seconds to brew, it still provides a considerable quantity of caffeine. The process also maintains a lot more aromatic and unstable coffee oils that you won't find in your normal cup of coffee.

Caffeine in an Espresso Shot

While espresso has the reputation of being high in caffeine, it all depends on how much you consume. Because the beverage tends to be offered in smaller sized portions than coffee, it can occasionally wind up having less caffeine than standard, brewed coffee. Triple and double shot drinks and mixed drinks like red-eyes can up the caffeine level substantially.

Espresso has 29 to 100 milligrams of caffeine in a single shot, usually hovering around 75 milligrams. A double shot contains 58 to 185 mg. For contrast, a cup of drip coffee can contain 80 to 200 mg of caffeine depending on the coffee bean and brewing technique.

Espresso has all of the same flavors of coffee however intensified-- bitter, mildly sweet, acidic, toasty. Italian people typically refer to it merely as caffè (coffee), espresso being the regular coffee to order; in Spain, while coffee shop expreso is seen as the a lot more "official" denomination, café solo (alone, without milk ) is the normal way to ask for it when at an espresso bar.

Espresso is prepared by forcing hot water through a layer of compacted ground coffee, had in a port-filter. Espresso is a very strong coffee, with a lot of aroma, flavor, and body. Preparing a shot of espresso needs training and knowledge, take a look at our espresso brewing guide, for a comprehensive tutorial.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?