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review 2017-11-16 00:20
The Librarian of Auschwitz
The Librarian of Auschwitz - Antonio Iturbe,Lilit Thwaites
 

 

“It’s the war, Edith……. it’s the war”. Every time I saw this comment in the novel I had to smile, for it showed me the attitude that some of the individuals acquired as they dealt with the circumstances they were dealing with.

This novel is about the prisoners that were held in the Family Camp, Block 31, a section of Auschwitz that allowed children and parents to be held together during WWII. The rules stated that the children would be entertained while their parents worked. School was forbidden but the children would be entertained with games and other activities. It was a unique situation, a first, and some individuals could not understand why it was happening. Fred Hirsch was in charge of the school, he knew the expectations but Hirsch had his own agenda. Hirsch created an invisible school, invisible to the people outside the walls of their contained area. He gave these children hope, strength and courage within their gated world. I loved how creative Hirsch was and how he encouraged others, he encouraged individuals to succeed. While death surrounded them, these children were able to be children, they were able to learn and have fun.

 

Hirsch has inquired a small library for this school, a handful of forbidden books. This library needs a librarian to make sure they are protected and safeguarded and Hirsch encourages Dita to accept this position. Dita is hesitant to accept this responsibility but Hirsch knew what he was doing when he asked her because she thrives in this position.


The world outside their contained area is full of change and uncertainty. The crematorium burns daily, prisoners are coming and going, romance still tries to kindle, and their future is uncertain but for now, the children feel safe. This was an excellent novel, because of its subject matter it is a difficult novel to read but it is an important novel that needs to be read and appreciated.

 

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review 2017-11-14 18:51
Review: "Necropolis" (Whyborne & Griffin, #4) by Jordan L. Hawk
Necropolis - Jordan L. Hawk

 

~ 4.5 stars ~

 

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review 2017-11-12 09:16
Review: "Carousel" (Whyborne & Griffin, #3.5) by Jordan L. Hawk
Carousel: A Whyborne & Griffin Short Story - Jordan L. Hawk

 

~ 3.5 stars ~

 

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review 2017-11-11 19:35
Review: "Stormhaven" (Whyborne & Griffin, #3) by Jordan L. Hawk
Stormhaven - Jordan L. Hawk

 

~ 4.5 stars ~

 

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review 2017-11-09 17:42
Review: Check These Out by Gina Sheridan
Check These Out: One Librarian's Catalog of the 200 Coolest, Best, and Most Important Books You'll Ever Read - Gina Sheridan

Pretty much a book about books; each book recommended had it's own page along with a description of the book and which patron to recommend the book to. I picked this up at the library because I decided that starting in 2018, I will be working on my masters degree in library and informational sciences (right now I am just deciding on where to apply and what requirements I need to meet). So I figured a book by a librarian who surveyed other librarians about what they recommend to their patrons can come in handy.

 

And yes, it is handy, but most of the books aren't to my taste. However, I have to give credit to the author for the balance in diversity in the books she chose to highlight in this book - whether from authors of color, to authors from the LGBT* community, books about mental illness, disability, social issues are all there alongside more well-known authors/books. The author also chose to devote a chapter to audiobooks and another to graphic novels, so she wasn't snobby about format. There is also a chapter on YA novels, with the caveat that these YA novels would be good fits for adult readers who enjoy YA, so she wasn't snobby about patrons' reading tastes either. The book did lean more to fiction than non-fiction, but some recent non-fiction reads were recommend for the writing styles were as engaging as some fiction reads.

 

There were books from the cannon of English Lit (Shakespeare) and modern classics (O. Henry), but also some works dating post WWII all the way through to the early 2010s. Alas, no genre specific chapters were written, so no romance, mystery, sci-fi books were recommended - the author stayed pretty firm in mainstream fiction/literary fiction section of the library. Still I made a list of the books she recommends and that seemed interesting to me (there were a few that I have already read) so I could add them to my TBR pile.

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