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Search tags: Manga-Classics
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review 2017-12-29 07:28
Manga Classics: The Count of Monte Cristo (Manga Classics) by Crystal S. Chan (Story Adaptation), Alexandre Dumas, Nokman Poon (Art by)
Count Of Monte Cristo Manga Classics - Alexandre Dumas

This is my first attempt at reading the classic and I was really excited at the chance of reading this adaption. Unfortunately it did not meet my expectations. 
The cover is spectacular and it caught my eye right away. The artwork was lovely and it pretty much covered all my requisites for manga, but when it came to the actual adaption of the story… sorry but no. 
The narrative is hard to follow and there were so many characters in the first few chapters that were introduced without proper explanation that I wasn’t able to tell them apart or tell where the heck they had come from. I usually read a book before I gift it to my younger peers to make sure they will be able to understand it, and being that I had a hard time following this one I sincerely think it’s not something I will be giving away any time soon, at least not to anyone that hasn’t had a crash course on the classics. 

** I received this book via Netgalley at no cost to me and I volunteered to read it; this is my honest opinion and given without any influence by the author or publisher.***

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text 2017-12-13 18:38
Perfectly suited to be a Shonen Jump Manga
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Manga Classics - Mark Twain

*Disclaimer: reviewing uncorrected eARC via NetGalley.

 

I loved this so, so much. Huck Finn was always my favourite Twain book, so this got a boost just for being imho a great story. I really liked the art style; basically Tom & Huck can be read as mischievous, good-hearted but troublemaking Shonen Jump heroes anyways, so it's just a super fun ride.

 

The subject matter and choices in adaptation deserve some comment, though. There's definitely what we'd call in 2017 "problematic" content around slavery and the portrayal of black people in general. Maybe it's just because I haven't re-read this book as an adult, but I really appreciated the way the Manga Classics adaptation helped the satire of the story stand out, making it clear how crazy the white kids' approach to their situation was, how little true empathy they had for the black (slaves') experience when it came down to it, and how illogical and absurd much of the adults' behaviour was as well. I remember reading this and watching movies a couple decades ago and thinking it was mostly a fun, at times emotional, kids adventure story. Reading this adaptation, it's MUCH clearer to me that Twain was commenting on slavery and a transformation in one boy's understanding of his world, justice and ethical behaviour. Huck learns to see Jim, the "runaway" black slave, as a full human and feels empathy for him by the end of the story, a big transformation from where he makes fun of him and treats him like something less-than-human at the beginning.

 

Appreciated the artist & adaptation notes at the end that spelled out some of the decisions that went into making the adaptation and grappling with how to tell the story. I thought this had great pacing (especially compared to some of the other Manga Classics adaptations that are obviously summarizing and racing through large portions of the story), the art was lovely, dynamic or funny and always expressive, depending on what the scene called for. I'd watch an anime based on this.

 

Language use is preserved from Twain's original, which at times is hard to puzzle out, since it's diving into some pretty heavy accents or dialects. Between that, N-word and the content around slavery, I wouldn't recommend this for cautious/beginning readers. But again, I loved it, so if you're up to sounding out the words and playing some guessing games as to content, definitely give this a shot.

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review 2017-12-03 13:28
Adventured of Huckleberry Finn!!!
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - Mark Twain,Crystal Chan

First things first: I received this book through NetGalley.

 

This review is going to hurt me more than any review I have ever written. I love these Manga Classics, they brought me closer to stories that I never thought I would like.

 

But this one on the other hand. I thought I was gonna love this. Adventures. I love adventures. But I was just so damn bored throughout this whole book.

 

The story was beautifully done. I loved the artwork, I loved the way the story was told. I loved it. It just didn't work for me at all.

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review 2017-11-28 03:03
Weird art edition of Kipling's animal stories
The Jungle Book: Manga Classics - cr Crystal S. Chan,Rudyard Kipling,julien choy

Disclaimer: reviewing an eARC edition for NetGalley

 

The art style of this edition totally didn't work for me, but if you enjoy it, the book does a good job summarizing a bunch of Rudyard Kipling's animal-oriented stories. Unlike many of the other Manga Classics series, rather than a pretty shoujo style, the art is more comedic and cartoony. Which could have been good, as there aren't romantic heroes in any of the stories to flatter, but something about the ways the eyes were drawn in particular just rubbed me the wrong way. Like, they look crazy, not funny. It's kind of a weird edition, because I wouldn't necessarily hand it to a little kid - the language and particularly the poems/songs are too challenging. But the art is definitely more kid-oriented. In this case, I'd say just read the originals for the full experience.

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review 2017-11-26 05:30
Generally appealing adaptation of a complex novel
Manga Classics: The Scarlet Letter Softcover - SunNeko Lee,Luke Mehall;Gaelen Engler;Drew Thayer;Ashley King;Stacy Bare;Chris Barlow;Erica Lineberry;Brendan Leonard;Teresa Bruffey;D. Scott Borden,Crystal Chan,Nathaniel Hawthorne

Disclaimer: Reviewing NetGalley eARC

 

I think I read this as a teen, though all I remember of the classic novel is that it was kind of tedious. This format does a good job of making it more accessible. There're notes at the end that talk about the adaptation and how some of the symbolism is captured with visual imagery, and that did seem to add a lot, though it seems that maybe the original message of the book got watered down somewhat. Generally appealing artwork, probably would have rated it higher if I appreciated the story more. :/

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