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Search tags: Many-Waters
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text 2018-01-18 02:57
Reading progress update: I've read 1 out of 304 pages.
The Waters of Eternal Youth (A Commissario Guido Brunetti Mystery) - Donna Leon

off to Venice, with my first Donna Leon novel, where I will keep company with Commissario Guido Brunetti as he deals with a cold case. excited!

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review 2018-01-16 14:02
Dream Waters (Dream Waters #1) by Erin A. Jensen
Dream Waters - Erin A. Jensen
Dream Waters is the first book in the Dream Waters series, and straight away I can tell you that this is a book that is refreshing in its originality.
 
Charlie is the main character, and he has been a long term resident of a mental hospital. This is due to the fact that he can see people's dream forms in everyday life. He is a bit of a character, but tries to remain positive. His life gets more interesting when Emma shows up at the facility. He feels the need to protect her, but also admits to liking her. Slowly, throughout the book, we find out Charlie's full story, Emma's story, and also get snippets from Nellie and Bob.
 
This is not a book to be rushed! It is to be savoured and enjoyed, as the author takes you to a world very different from the one you recognise. It is very well written, with no editing or grammatical errors that I noticed. The pacing is smooth, and the scenes flow without disruption from one to the next. With a very interesting cast of characters, this book will definitely leave you wanting more. Highly recommended by me.
 
* A copy of this book was provided to me with no requirements for a review. I voluntarily read this book, and the comments here are my honest opinion *
 
Merissa
Archaeolibrarian - I Dig Good Books!

 

Source: archaeolibrarianologist.blogspot.de/2018/01/vbt-excerpt-reviews-giveaway-dream.html
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text 2018-01-15 16:47
Celebrating Martin Luther King, Jr.
Carry Me Home: Birmingham, Alabama: The Climactic Battle of the Civil Rights Revolution - Diane McWhorter
At Canaan's Edge: America in the King Years 1965-68 - Taylor Branch
Pillar of Fire: America in the King Years 1963-65 - Taylor Branch
Parting the Waters: America in the King Years, 1954-63 - Taylor Branch

Some suggested reading from publisher Simon & Schuster's newsletter.

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review 2017-12-19 03:27
Revisiting an old favorite + the movie is coming out next year
Madeleine L'Engle's Time Quartet Box Set (A Wrinkle in Time, A Wind in the Door, A Swiftly Tilting Planet, Many Waters) by Madeleine L'Engle (2001-09-11) - Madeleine L'Engle

For many years, when people would ask me about my favorite book I would promptly say that it was A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L'Engle. Recently, I started to wonder if my love for the novel had stood the test of time so I picked up the 4 book series entitled the Time Quartet (I have the box set that I got years ago) from my shelf and dove in headfirst. Reading the first book in the series, A Wrinkle in Time, completely transported me back to middle school when I first discovered the delightful writing of L'Engle. The book was just as fantastic as I remembered but with the passing of time I see more clearly the overt references to Christianity which were lost on me as a child. (She's a bit like C.S. Lewis in the way that she writes for children about Christianity but instead of fantasy devices she uses science fiction and fantasy.) This literary device would increase as the series continued and in a lot of ways it took away some of the enjoyment of the books for me. One of the bonuses of L'Engle's writing is that it is never 'dumbed down' for her child audience. She uses technical terminology and speaks of scientific endeavors as if the reader should already be aware of them. When I first read that book, this was a foreign concept to me as I didn't think I was any good at the sciences when I was in school. (Now look at how many scientific books I've read and reviewed!)

 

The main character in the first book is Meg, eldest sister of the Murry clan, and we see everything from her point of view. A large portion of why I loved this book was that Meg wasn't a typical girl of her age and I strongly identified with her (and I had a crush on Calvin).  A Wrinkle in Time focuses on Meg's relationship with herself, her family, and her peers (especially Calvin). She sees herself as 'other' except when she's with Charles Wallace or her mother (or Calvin...yes, I'm enjoying myself). It doesn't help that their father has been missing for so long that the postman in town has started asking impertinent questions. (The whole town is gossiping or so it seems.) While Meg plays a large role in A Wind in the Door, the main part of the plot is written with Charles Wallace (youngest Murry son) as the main character. Both books are full of adventure and self-discovery. Both Murry children come into their own and use their unique strengths to help them accomplish their goals. The stakes are always set extremely high and the pace is alternately rushed no-holds-barred action and so lackadaisical as to seem stagnant. (Note: If you don't enjoy books with a lot of descriptions and copious amounts of symbolism then I'm afraid this isn't the series for you.) By A Swiftly Tilting Planet, I felt almost overwhelmed by the underlying religious messages and the conclusion, Many Waters, which focuses on the twins, Sandy and Dennis, was so far-fetched as to be ridiculous. (Books 3 and 4 are so convoluted that I don't feel like I can talk about them in detail other than to say they are out there.) Part of me wishes that I had stopped reading at A Wrinkle in Time (as I had done for so many years) so as to not shatter the illusion of what this series meant to me but part of the reason I started this blog was to explore new books and to give as honest a review as possible. The hope is that even if I don't enjoy a book it might interest someone else. With that being said, A Wrinkle in Time remains in my top 50 all-time faves but the others...not so much. 9/10 for book 1 and a 3/10 for the series overall.

 

A/N: I just did a little Google search and discovered that although I have the box set which is called the Time Quartet there was actually a fifth book written called An Acceptable Time and which called for a new set to be created, the Time Quintet. I feel like I've been hoodwinked! Does this mean I need to find a copy of this book to complete the experience?! (Spoiler alert: I am probably not going to do this.)

 

Here's the complete set. [Source: Barnes & Noble]

 

 

What's Up Next: Grendel by John Gardner

 

What I'm Currently Reading: Scythe by Neal Shusterman (been reading it for weeks because I've reached the end-of-year reading slowdown)

 

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
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text 2017-11-30 21:09
November 2017 Reading Wrap Up
Fall of Poppies: Stories of Love and the Great War - Lauren Willig,Joshilyn Jackson;Hazel Gaynor;Mary McNear;Nadia Hashimi;Emmi Itäranta;CJ Hauser;Katherine Harbour;Rebecca Rotert;Holly Brown;M. P. Cooley;Carrie La Seur;Sarah Creech,Jennifer Robson,Marci Jefferson,Jessica Brockmole,Beatriz Williams,Evangeli
March: Book Three - Andrew Aydin,Nate Powell,John Lewis Gaddis
The Unyielding - Shelly Laurenston
Through Waters Deep - Sarah Sundin
The Complete Maus - Art Spiegelman

Here's the good, the bad, and the ugly for November. This whole household has been sick since Thanksgiving and we are slowly recovering. Planning on setting up holiday decorations this weekend. Today we got snow showers, and tonight we even got some snow to stick to the ground; my son said that seeing the snow is makes him feel the holiday spirit.

 

I finished two series, March and Call of Crows. Turns out this month was not good for mysteries, as I DNF'd 3 cozy mysteries, mostly due to characters I could not get into or like enough to stay in their head for novel length of time.

 

Challenges:

BL/GR: 159/150

Pop Sugar: 4; 49/52 for the year

16 Festive Tasks: 16 points

Library Love: 4; 52/36 for the year (I definitely should have gone with the higher goal level)

 

1. Fall of Poppies: Stories of Love from the Great War by Various Authors (one story used for Pop Sugar prompt Set in 2 different time periods) - 4 stars

2. March Volume 3 by Rep John Lewis et al - 5 stars

3. A Taste of Chardonnay (Napa Wine Heiresses #1) by Heather Heyford (Library Love) - 3.5 stars

4. Check These Out by Gina Sheridan (Library Love) (Pop Sugar prompt Career Advice) - 3 stars

5. Love's First Flames (Banished Saga #0.5) by Ramona Flightner - 2 stars

6. A Wreath of Snow by Liz Curtis Higgs - 2.5 stars

7. The Unyielding (Call of Crows #3) by Shelley Laurenston - 5 stars

8. Through Waters Deep (Waves of Freedom #1) by Sarah Sundin - 5 stars

9. The Complete Maus by Art Spiegelman (Library Love) (Pop Sugar prompts Recommended by a Librarian and Story within a Story) - 4 stars

10. Reasons Mommy Drinks by Lyranda Martin-Evans and Fiona Stevenson (Library Love) - 3 stars

11. The Toymaker by Kay Springsteen - 1 star

 

DNFs:

12. It Had to Be You by Delynn Royer

13. Chocolate Chip Cookie Murder by Joanne Fluke

14. Death of a Christmas Caterer by Lee Hollis

 

Currently Reading

1. Unleashed (Love to the Rescue #1) by Rachel Lacey

2. American Born Chinese by Gene Luen Yang

3. Saga Volumes 2-4 by Brian K. Vaughn and Fiona Staples

4. Burning Bright: Four Chanukah Stories by Various Authors

 

 

 

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