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Search tags: Marquis-de-Sade
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review 2018-12-08 11:55
Phallocracy: "Juliette" by Marquis de Sade, Austryn Wainhouse (Trans.)
Juliette - Austryn Wainhouse,Marquis de Sade


(Original Review, 1981-04-04)



Histoire de Juliette ou les Prospérités du Vice (Story of Juliette or The Prosperities of Vice) by de Sade.

Profoundly disturbing - not only in its depiction of cold-hearted indulgence, by way of a text nearly as long as War and Peace, in murder, rape, robbery and more horrors besides, but also in its capability to beguile and confuse readers of a feminist persuasion.

Angela Carter fell for it: "[Sade's] great women [characters in Juliette], ... once they have tasted power, once they know how to use their sexuality as an instrument of aggression, they use it to extract vengeance for the humiliations they were forced to endure as the passive objects of the sexual energy of others ...”

 

 

 

If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.

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review 2018-10-28 13:46
Philosophy in the Bedroom: "The 120 Days of Sodom" by Marquis de Sade
The 120 Days of Sodom - Marquis de Sade

(Original Review, 2008)

 


Personally,I think the way to understand De Sade is as a global pioneer in the art of trolling. His actual sexual acts were fairly tame in the broad scheme of things - 15 year-old servants, but people were getting married at that age in his time. As far as history records, his actual practical sexual tastes didn't extend much further than a little light flagellation and buggery. What he really loved was to shock and upset people with what he wrote, and he was extraordinarily good at it. In 'Philosophy in the Bedroom', he extends the theory that God must want us to have anal sex, or he wouldn't have made our arseholes so deliciously tight.

 

 

If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.

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review 2018-04-08 00:00
120 Days of Sodom
120 Days of Sodom - Marquis de Sade I wanted to finish this book, I really did. It was on my TBR for years and I was eager to finally check it off. But there's only so much of reading people eating shit one can take before it gets repetitive, and I have better things to do with my time.
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review 2017-08-23 00:00
Η φιλοσοφία στο μπουντουάρ
Η φιλοσοφία στο μπουντουάρ - Marquis de Sade,Βασίλης Καλλιπολίτης Όλα όσα περίμενα να διαβάσω στο Μέγα Ανατολικό του Εμπειρίκου τα βρήκα ανεξαιρέτως στον de Sade.
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text 2015-02-25 00:49
Random Bookish Links and Grrr, This Keyboard

If I'm a bit quieter of late the reasons:

1) the move and the job, and

2) this old laptop I'm on. I'm having a huge hate-relationship with this keyboard. I'll be typing along as usual and suddenly the cursor will hop a few lines above or below, and I'll be typing in the middle of another sentence. It does other quirky things - that's just the most regular symptom.

 

There's a new laptop in my future but that's going to have to wait til I have time to get it - I have a mess o' errands to get to before then.

 

Meanwhile, here are some random things I've been reading online - a new Sherlock story, Harper Lee's old novel may be just an early draft of Mockingbird, reading old writing in the margins, a negative review that still makes me want to see a museum exhibit, and a de Sade article that just had to mention Christian Grey (but only in the title).

 

Scottish man finds lost Sherlock Holmes story from 1904 in attic

By Rachelle Blinder, New York Daily News, February 20, 2015

"...Walter Elliot, 80, said he found the 1904 short story, "Sherlock Holmes: Discovering the Border Burgs and, by Deduction, the Brig Bazaar," while looking through old papers to display in a local pop-up museum.

The 1,300-word story was nestled inside a long-forgotten pamphlet that a friend had given to him more than 50 years ago, Elliot said.

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle wrote the piece for a 48-page booklet to raise money for a bridge in Selkirk, Scotland, Elliot said. The pamphlet, with stories by local authors, was called "The Book o' Brig" after the name of the wood bridge that washed away in a flood in 1902."

 

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