logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Michelle-Fox
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-11-27 22:10
The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander
The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness - Michelle Alexander

This is an important read for social-justice-oriented folk. Michelle Alexander – a law professor and former ACLU attorney – lays out a cogent argument for mass incarceration and the drug war functioning as systems of racial control, comparable though not identical to prior systems such as Jim Crow. Although white and black Americans use drugs at similar rates, law enforcement treats it as a war only in poor communities of color, where it terrorizes people with military equipment and tactics, and seizes property as “forfeiture.” Harsh penalties, particularly for those drugs most associated with black people, mean more African-Americans are behind bars now than were imprisoned just before the Civil War. In some large cities, nearly half of African-American men are under penal control, whether in prison or on probation or parole. And once released, anyone with a criminal record is a legal target for discrimination in employment, housing, professional licensing, student loans, public benefits, etc. People with a felony record can be prevented from voting or sitting on a jury. And the effects extend beyond imprisonment and even discrimination, tarring the entire black community with the brush of criminality in many people’s minds, so that mass incarceration in many ways defines the relationship between African-American society and the rest of America.

My biggest doubt about the comparison, before reading the book, was how a system that bases punishment on individual actions could compare to blanket laws disenfranchising people based on race. Alexander doesn’t deal with the personal choice issue quite as directly as I would like, instead making the point that everyone breaks some law sometime, but black communities are the ones heavily targeted by law enforcement. Even if the only thing you do is speed a little, if you’re white you’ll probably never be stopped, but if black you’re liable to be pulled over and have the police “ask” to search your car for drugs (to most people it doesn’t sound much like asking with a uniform and a gun). If we pursued every violation of the law so aggressively in white communities, and treated white kids as potential criminals from a young age, and handed out sentences counted in decades for non-violent crimes commonly associated with white people, huge numbers of them would also wind up locked up, on probation or parole, or with criminal records. That wouldn’t happen, though, which is good evidence that something is going on here that isn’t just about keeping the community safe.

Obviously I’ve only covered the tip of the iceberg here; Alexander is thorough, and her writing clear and convincing, well-sourced through extensive endnotes but still readable for non-academics. Once I got into the book, the pages went by quickly. She says at the beginning that this book is intended for people who care about racial justice but tend to view racial disparities in the criminal justice system as regrettable side effects of societal racism rather than a system of disenfranchisement. As a member of the intended audience, I found this book eye-opening, creating a real perspective shift. I wish I could distill that into a review, but Alexander has already done the work, so I will just recommend the book instead.

Like Reblog Comment
review 2017-11-24 00:00
A Cruel Kind of Beautiful
A Cruel Kind of Beautiful - Michelle Hazen Insecurity is a subject that faces everyone at one time or another. Strength of character lies not in the possessions a person obtains but in the wisdom that helps them become who they were meant to be. A Cruel Kind of Beautiful travels the pathway of raw sensuality and courageous bravery. Whether it be learning to face fears or helping to dry away those rainy day tears, Ms. Hazen keys in on the emotions that make a person tick and strikes a chord to the heart.
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-11-10 23:51
Can't wait to read Michelle Obama's memoir.
Chasing Light: Michelle Obama Through th... Chasing Light: Michelle Obama Through the Lens of a White House Photographer - Amanda Lucidon

Since I just finished Pete Souza's newly released book that is a collection of pictures from President Obama's administration it seemed like looking at Lucidon's book on former First Lady Michelle Obama would be a good companion read although they're two very different and separate books.

 

Since the former First Lady obviously had a very different role than her husband the pictures are different but no less enjoyable. I'm not sure I recognized as many of these but all the same it was great to relive the administration through the eyes of the photographer as well as via the pictures who met with and/or interacted with her and her husband. One thing I would have liked that was present in Souza's book was some of the text explanations of some of the well-known photographs he took. There's a little bit of that here but I would have just liked more. :)

 

Again, there's not much else to say. It's a picture-heavy book that would make an excellent display on a coffee table or to have on your book shell. Thankfully it's not as large or as heavy as Souza's book, too! That's definitely a plus. 

 

There isn't really much that's wrong with the book but I rated it 3 stars because I felt there was more that could be done. More photos, more interesting text (unfortunately I didn't feel Lucidon had as many interesting things to say but that's just me). But that said, the book is very nice and perhaps it's a mistake on my part to look at it right after Souza's. I'm also not really into photography/coffee table-style books so that could be a part of it.

 

Borrow from the library or skim it in the bookstore if you're not sure. But it'd probably make a nice gift for the right person, too.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-11-10 20:07
12 Days at Bleakly Manor
12 Days at Bleakly Manor: Book 1 in Once Upon a Dickens Christmas - Michelle Griep

<!-- [if lte IE 9]> <![endif]-->Title: 12 Days at Bleakly Manor Bleakly Manor
Author: Michelle Griep
Publisher: Barbour Publishing, Inc.
Series: Book 1 in Once Upon a Dickens Christmas
Reviewed By: Arlena Dean
Rating: Four
Review:

"12 Day at Bleakly Manor" by Michelle Griep

My Thoughts.....

This was quite a interesting story of Christian historical romance and mystery during 1850's holidays in England. I liked how this author brings to the readers some really intriguing characters during the '12 Days at Bleakly Manor' that had a particular reason for being at this location. Be ready for a fast paced, fun, quirky read with a Gothic and mysterious setting with some great descriptions given and even a little bite of danger.

What happens when Clara Chapman who was once from a well to do family, rejected by her father and later by her fiancé now found to be poor living with her Aunt Deborha receives a cyptic invitation?

"The Twelve Days of Christmas
As never's been reveled
Your presence, Miss Chapman,
Is respectfully hearld.
Bleakly Manor's the place
And after twelve nights
Five hundred pounds
Will be yours by rights."

Who was Benjamin Lane who had been in prison for stealing and is to be deportation to a labor camp from another country. Now what on earth does he have to do with all or this? Well, as the reader continues to read we find that Benjamin believes he was been betrayed by someone he once had loved and that he was also innocent of all of this mess he had been accused of. What will happen when he receives the same invitation to Bleakly Manor that 10 others had received? Now, what will Ben be promised?

Will Clara and Ben [the two main characters] who had some huge misunderstandings be able to work through it all out just be able to come to a better understanding of it all?

I enjoyed how this author was able to bring in the Christian elements [with trust and faith elements] in this very realistic story that will keep you turning the pages to see what was coming next in this story that was of 'second chances and choosing between revenge ad forgiveness.' I did notice that the '12 day of Bleakly Manor 'started on December 24th and ending January 5, 1851 which I thought was somewhat strange but as I was reading I get this idea from the author was done for a particular reason.

This was quite a interesting story after all is said and done. To find all of the answers to the above questions and so much more you will have to pick up this good read that has so many twist to see it's a good story of second chances and redeemed love. This is definitely one of those stories that will keep one guessing until the very end! Even though this novel is around Christmas holiday, I found that it's the kind of read that one can be read at any time of the year.

 
 

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-10-31 00:28
Lots of angst
Misadventures of the First Daughter - Meredith Wild,Mia Michelle

This fifth book in the Misadventures series showed promise with its forbidden romance, and I did enjoy the love story between Zane and Charlotte and I think I would've enjoyed it more had the story focused more on that aspect. This pair is quite good together and their story does get steamy with a bit of Dom/Sub light. The danger and suspense added was a nice touch to keep the story flowing, but the her problems with her parents added more angst than I cared for. The story does end well, if a bit abrupt after everything this couple had gone through, and it is worth the read, just a bit high on unnecessary angst for my tastes. 

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?