logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Michio-Kaku
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2016-04-04 01:18
Physics of the Future: How Science Will Shape Human Destiny and Our Daily Lives by the Year 2100 - Michio Kaku

this book is interesting, but at times he drives me bonkers with his assumptions.

 

overall there is this optimism that at times borders on arrogance, and completely ignores some rather significant factors.  like intellectual property law and commercialization, and exactly how much they can impede or encourage technological breakthroughs.  and he keeps bringing up the cave-man principal, and then in a lot of cases fails to really consider how it will additionally impede certain technology innovations (i mean, he loves talking about the day when we'll have an internet connection to our contacts, but its only near the end of the book that he starts talking about privacy issues).

 

also, his dismissal of the issues of a 'digital divide' has me seeing red.

Despite the importance of this shift, however, it is far from complete. The digital divide remains significant. By the end of 2015, only 7% of households in the least developed countries and 34% of households in developing countries will have Internet access, compared to 80% in developed countries. See Int’l Telecomm. Union, ICT Facts & Figures (2015), http://www.itu.int/en/ITU-D/Statistics/Documents/facts/ ICTFactsFigures2015.pdf.

 

I work with people who are caught in the digital divide, it's not something to simply be dismissed.

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2014-12-05 20:31
Interstellar Problems

 

I won't be seeing Interstellar. I have my reasons. Although, physicist, Kip Thorne, was consulted regarding the science presented in this movie, Hollywood still managed to fudge the science. Fiction involves suspension of disbelief and Hollywood suspends disbelief all too well. Much current science fiction, both written and staged, sadly lacks substantially accurate science.

 

Using a black hole as a short cut through space is not a new idea, but that doesn’t make it any less unlikely. Should you enter a black hole feet first, you’d find that the mass within is so great that your feet would begin to stretch. By the time your head entered as well, you’d be stretched like a strand of spaghetti. Not to mention, crushed.

 

But Interstellar’s black hole is no ordinary one; it’s a gateway into a wormhole. Although no one has found evidence of wormholes, they are thought to be quite narrow—too narrow for spaceships, or even feet, to pass through. Even if you found one large enough to allow your passage, they are also thought to be unstable. The wormhole might disappear long before your ship arrives at its door.

 

Another physicist, Michio Kaku, has classified possible alien societies by their degree of technical savvy. Our society falls well short of having sufficient technical ability to control wormholes. More conventional space travel falls closer to our current abilities. But, Interstellar requires a wormhole in order to reach another galaxy. The only problem there is that wormholes don’t necessarily lead to other galaxies. Instead, they could lead elsewhere, perhaps to other universes.

 

More: http://truthtalltales.blogspot.com/2014/11/galaxy-jest.html#links

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2014-12-03 17:16
Physics of the Future by Michio Kaku
Physics of the Future: How Science Will Shape Human Destiny and Our Daily Lives by the Year 2100 - Michio Kaku
‎By 2100, our destiny is to become like the gods we once worshipped and feared. But our tools will not be magic wands and potions but the science of computers, nanotechnology, artificial intelligence, biotechnology, and most of all, the quantum theory.


Michio Kaku takes the reader through the current research being done today in several areas such as medicine, computer science, AI, energy, etc. and what we can expect in the near and all the way to the beginning of the next century. And as he says, magic wands and potions will not be our tools. My own journey with magic began with, like many other people, the Harry Potter series. All that magic neatly wrapped up in a story that I could never live out in reality (except, you know, in my wildest dreams). But as I grew older I found science. Biology, chemistry, math, and most important physics. To me, this is as close to magic as I'll ever get, and that's enough for me. Okay, the HP magic is pretty cool, but still. Naturally, this book was for me, and I knew that the instant I saw it.

Anyway, Kaku presents some downright amazing stuff. Probes finding cancer before it breaks out. Cars driving themselves and thus preventing deaths related to car accidents. Robots living among us as equals. Space travel and a wider understanding of the universe. Being able to move things with a mere thought due to help from superconductors. Means to help us live longer. I mean, seriously, who wouldn't want all this stuff?

Now, I'm not going to pretend I know ever aspect of every area Kaku brings forward. I'm far from educated in them all, and I have seen other reviews claiming some parts is wrong, both in terminology and other aspects. But I'm not going to say either is right or wrong. People have predicted the future and what science will be able to bring with it too many times and I think believing something is impossible is simply the wrong attitude. Because there are certain aspects that are done and told exceptionally well. Kaku is obviously a smart man and the scientists he's interviewed are so as well. And I strongly doubt they are wrong as well. Many of them are highly-respected scientists (this I actually know for sure), and have great insight in how the future might look for us. What can be the problem is that Kaku himself is not an expert and might have gotten a thing or two wrong, but I doubt the actual science is wrong since many of the theories are in a stage where prototypes of various sorts are in the making.

And, come on, it's more fun to believe the future will evolve and give us new incredible devices and means for living. And, controlling things with your ming? Don't tell me that isn't magic.

Like Reblog Comment
review 2014-03-27 00:00
The Future of the Mind: The Scientific Quest to Understand, Enhance, and Empower the Mind
The Future of the Mind: The Scientific Quest to Understand, Enhance, and Empower the Mind - Michio Kaku Kaku is a good explainer (expounder? teacher through writing?) of science, and this is a good read. It's thought-provoking and exciting. He makes the same mistake he usually does, which is over-simplification and presenting possibilities as givens. In short, he promises us way too much and sweeps all complications and objections away with alacrity. But as long as you're ready for that, it's a good book and may let you know of some possibilities you weren't aware of (even if they're not givens).
Like Reblog
review 2014-03-20 00:00
The Future of the Mind: The Scientific Quest to Understand, Enhance, and Empower the Mind
The Future of the Mind: The Scientific Quest to Understand, Enhance, and Empower the Mind - Michio Kaku Every so often an author makes a stab at, "what makes humans special from all other animals". Michio Kaku does his best through defining humans through their ability to simulate the future both in space and time. He uses this definition for human consciousness and specialness and goes about explaining all phenomena arising from the brain. There's almost no topic he doesn't touch, hypnosis, outer-body-experience, abnormal psychology, BMI (brain machine interface), and so on.

For each topic, he gives the history, the current state of the art and then some wild speculations about the topic. Each topic is covered widely but he doesn't have a chance to delve into in depth with the exception of the final chapter on Artificial Intelligence. He gives his all on that topic, and he even explains the Kurzweill's Singularity better than Kurzweil does.

I learned more about the right/left mind dichotomy in this book than I have from books dedicated to that topic because that kept popping up in most of the different topics he was covering. That part of the story was more interesting to me than the author's special definition of what makes humans special.

It's hard not to like an author who seems to know every episode of Star Trek or Twilight Zone and knows how to relate that to what he is writing about. If your anything like me, you probably love it when Michio Kaku appears on the Discovery Channel because he's going to give you a sound bite you will understand and can make your own.

Unfortunately, for me, the book is more sound bite than depth, but for some that will be why they like the book more than I do.
More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?