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text 2018-03-12 06:28
Lake B2B’s Nurse Email List Helps to Foster Your Healthcare Data Network

Specialize your healthcare marketing for the nursing industry. The sector is growing at a steep rate with a high demand for licensed nurses and medical associates. Maximize your reach in the potent market with authenticated email contacts of top nurses and medical aides across the world.  The smart Nurse Email List from Lake B2B is your best bet to create a strong network amongst healthcare professionals.

 

With our extensive sources, we have accumulated high-end nursing industry contacts supported by multi-level authentication. Our region-segmented database provides professionals’ records that cover niche roles like CRNAs, Licensed Practical Nurses, Licensed Vocational Nurses, Nurse Practitioners, Nurse Aides, Registered Nurses, Nurse Midwives, and more.

For More Details:

 

Call Us: (800) 710-5516

 

Email us: info@lakeb2b.com

Source: www.lakeb2b.com/nurse-email-list
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review 2017-09-12 20:28
Mail Order Bride: Cate's Change of Heart, Faith-Ann Smith
Mail Order Bride: Cate's Change Of Heart... Mail Order Bride: Cate's Change Of Heart (Nurses Of The Civil War Book 4) - Faith-Ann Smith

I really enjoyed this clean, Historical romance. I voluntarily chose to review it. I've given it a 5* rating. This heroine was a civil War Nurse. She is gutsy, stubborn, and kind hearted. The hero is basically a good guy, caught in a bad situation. This has a few twists and turns and a real nice ending. There are also some bonus stories with this story, so you get a little more for your money. So I'm on to the next story.

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review 2017-08-30 10:28
Heroines that must honoured
Women in the Great War - Tanya Wynn,Stephen Wynn

Thanks to Pen & Sword for sending me a paperback copy of this book that I freely chose to review.

I’m not sure why but as I read this book I realised I had read much more about World War II than about the Great War, and having a degree in American Studies, I had read a fair bit about American women’s war efforts (during WWII) but knew very little about what women had done during WWI, other than through some war novels where they would appear as nurses, but little else. That was one of the reasons why I was interested in this book from the Pen & Sword’s catalogue. At a time when women didn’t have the vote but were fighting for it, the war and the changes it brought had an enormous impact on the lives of British women (and women in general).

The book is divided into a number of chapters that after setting up the scene (Chapter 1. Women in General), discuss the different organisations and roles women took up during the war. We have chapters dedicated to women who became munition workers (yes, it was not only Rosie the Riveter who took up that task, and it’s amazing to think that women whose roles were so restricted at the time took to heavy factory work with such enthusiasm, despite the risks involved, although there was fun to be had too, like the women’s football teams organised at some of the factories), the Voluntary Air Detachments (Agatha Christie was employed by the VAD as a nurse and dispenser, and it seems her knowledge of medications and substances was to prove very handy in her writing career), The Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps (later the Queen Mary’s Army Auxiliary Corps, to reflect Queen Mary’s patronage), Women’s Legion and Other Women’s Organisations (including some like the Women’s Land Army, Women Police Volunteer, The Women’s Forage Corps [that required a great deal of physical strength]).

The chapter entitled Individual Women of the Great War includes fascinating stories, most of them worthy of a whole book, like those of Dorothy Lawrence, who dressed as a man and became a soldier although never actually fought, several spies, among them one of the best known and remembered Edith Louisa Cavell, a nurse, and perhaps my favourite, Flora Sanders, who was born in Yorkshire and actually fought in the war and became a Captain in the Serbian Army (and yes, in this case they knew she was a woman but did not seem to mind very much). Another favourite of mine has to be Violet Constance Jessop ‘the unsinkable’ who worked as a stewardess in a number of liners and survived the thinking of three big ships, including the Titanic’s. That never put her off and she worked at sea her whole career and died of old age.

There is a chapter dedicated to those who lost their lives during the war (and were not included in one of the previous chapters). The authors have checked a number of archives and list as many details as are available for these 241 women. For some, there’s only a name, date, and age (and where they were serving), for others there is more information. Reading through the list, that I am sure will be of great help to researchers looking for information on the subject, I was surprised by how many nurses died of what now would be considered pretty trivial illnesses (influenza, many of pneumonia, some of the nurses in far away locations died of dysentery, some of undiagnosed illnesses, or appendicitis) making evident not only how much medical science has advanced but also the precarious and exhausting conditions under which they worked, putting their duty before their own health. Quite a number went down with ships that had either been bombed or had hit mines, and some were unfortunate enough to be killed during raids when they were back home on a permit. In some cases, families lost several members to the war and one can only imagine the effects that must have had on their surviving relatives.

The last chapter mentions Queen Mary and Princess Mary’s war efforts, which had a great impact on monetary donations and on enlistment of both men and women. The conclusion reminds us that women had a great role to play during the Great War, both at home and indeed close to the action.

The book is well researched and combines specific data with personal stories, making it of interest to both researchers and readers who want to know more about that historical period, in particular about women’s history. Some chapters, like the one dedicated to individual women, are a good starting point to encourage further reading and engage the curiosity of those not so familiar with the topic.

A fitting homage to those women, who, as the authors write in the conclusion, should also be honoured on Remembrance Day.

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review 2017-02-03 00:11
MERCY AND MAYHEM by Ava Mallory
Mercy & Mayhem: A Mercy Mares Cozy Mystery - Ava Mallory
  First of the Mercy Mares Cozy Mystery. This sets up the characters and Mercy's profession. It was fun and lighthearted. I enjoyed the mystery although I did not solve it. Being that Mercy is a traveling nurse I'm not sure how some of the characters will be able to remain in the series. I liked Mercy but I loved Nubbin' and Betty. I want to read more of this series to see who stays and who goes.
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review 2017-01-08 14:59
African American and Cherokee Nurses in ... African American and Cherokee Nurses in Appalachia: A History, 1900-1965 - Phoebe Ann Pollitt

When I first read the introduction to this book, I recognized that I was one of those people who just assumed that Appalachia was lily-white. Clearly, I had a lot to learn and this book was a big help.

The style is definitely scholarly, rather than narrative, and few, if any, individuals appear in more than one chapter. Still, it's a quick read and very informative, so I'd recommend it to anyone interested in Appalachia.


Disclaimer: free copy sent in exchange for an honest review.

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