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review 2018-08-04 04:28
Joseph Bates: The Real Founder of Seventh-day Adventism
Joseph Bates: The Real Founder of Seventh-Day Adventism - George R. Knight

While those who would eventually form the Seventh-day Adventist Church were Millerites, only one was influential in both that his work after the Great Disappointment would standout and provide the underpinnings of the eventual largest Adventist denomination.  Joseph Bates: The Real Founder of Seventh-day Adventism by George R. Knight is a comprehensive look at one of the most important men in the Adventism movement before and after October 1844.

 

Beginning with a young boy looking for adventure as a sailor, Knight fully covers the life of Joseph Bates until his death as a senior statesman of the Church he helped to found still looking to serve Christ.  In covering Bates career at sea, Knight pulls out traits—both potentially benefital and harmful—that would serve him as he preached the soon coming of Christ as part of the Millerite movement and later his development of Sabbatarian Adventism.  After retiring, Bates who had already shown a keen interest in reform, firstly himself and then his own ship’s crew, launched himself into numerous reform movements until he heard Advent message of William Miller and seeing it as the ultimate reform movement wholeheartedly went to spread the good news.  Though not a primary leader, he was a major secondary leader within the Millerites that both chaired conferences and went out preaching.  After the Great Disappointment of October 1844, Bates began studying and joined those Adventists that believed something did occur though not the fanatics that tainted this group of post-Disappointment Millerites.  It is at this point in which Knight carefully covers Bates life over a decade, though focused on a four year span in particular, in which Bates became both the first theologian and then first historian of Sabbatarian Adventism and would lay the foundations of essentially all major doctrines that set the Seventh-day Adventist Church apart from other denominations.  Knight covers Bates relationship with both James and Ellen White in full during this period and after as the trio would guide the “little flock” over the next two decades until his death.

 

In approximately 220 pages of text and reference, Knight use Bates’ own autobiography as well as research first discovered others including two of his own students to give the reader a full sense of the life of Joseph Bate as can be expected.  Though the book is not strictly chronological, Knight structures the book in such a way as to give an overview in a certain period of Bates life in one chapter and in the subsequent one focus on a particular aspect during that period with it most typically being theological in nature.  This keeps the book engaging for the general reader and not getting them bogged down or overwhelmed with detail of having a strictly chronological book from beginning to end.  Yet while these choices by Knight create a very good and readable book, there just seemed to be something off with his writing that made me feel that it was up to other books that he had authored.

 

Joseph Bates: The Real Founder of Seventh-day Adventism is a very good book for those, whether Seventh-day Adventists or not, looking to understand the history of denomination that Bates helped to found.  As the preeminent Seventh-day Adventist historian, George R. Knight presents the Bates the man of both virtues and flaws and how he shaped the Advent movement.  I highly recommend this book for those interested in SDA Church history.

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review 2018-07-23 09:20
Founder, Fighter, Saxon Queen by Margaret C. Jones
Founder, Fighter, Saxon Queen: Aethelflaed, Lady of the Mercians - Margaret Jones

TITLE:  Founder, Fighter, Saxon Queen:  Aethelflaed, Lady of the Mercians

 

AUTHOR: Margaret C. Jones

 

EXPECTED PUBLICATION DATE:       

30 August 2018

 

FORMAT: ARC ebook

 

ISBN-13: 9781526733962

_________________________________

NOTE: I received an Advanced Readers Copy of this book from NetGalley. This review is my honest opinion of the book.

_________________________________

 

This biography is about Alfred the Great's daughter, Aethelflaed; about ther life and achievements, as well as the world that made her.  Aethelflaed was a remarkable women who led armies in battle against the vikings, negotiated treaties, founded shrines and churches, planned towns, and ruled a kingdom in her own right, which involved tax collection and law administration.  She also attempted to pass the rule of Mercia to her daughter Aelfwynn.  This well-written and well researched book covers the cultural and familial world that shaped Aethelflaed's personality and beliefs.  It covers her early life, the years of her marriage, and the world she made after her husband's death.  An interesting chapter deals with Aethelflaed's legacy and legand.  The book also includes a section of notes that provides a guide of places around the Midlands that still bear traces of Aethelflaed's life and work or have memorial tributes to her, which may be of interest to anyone travelling to this part of England.  There are many maps and illustrations, however this book lacks a locality map of where Mercia fits into Greater England and also lacking is a timeline.  While I found this biography interesting and accessible ( narrative was distinctly story-like), there was too much speculation on the part of the author, though this appears to be due to the lack of reliable source material for this time period.  All-in-all, this is an entertaining and informative, if somewhat superficial, biography of Aethelflaed, Queen of Mercia.

 

 

OTHER BOOK:


A Brief History of the Anglo-Saxons: The Beginnings of the English Nation by Geoffrey Hindley

 

 

 

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review 2017-11-03 16:00
The Founder (A Broken World Book #4) by Dean Murray
The Founder - Dean Murray
The Founder is the fourth book in the Broken World series, but this book takes you on a different route than the previous three. In this one, Skye is by herself, not knowing if she will ever see Brennan again. Instead of running away from the enclave, she is running towards it. She is searching for her mother, and will do whatever it takes to get answers. This book certainly has a different dynamic to the others - don't get me wrong, I love Skye. It was just a bit strange to only hear about her and not Brennan too. Instead, Skye manages to get a small group of friends, none of whom know who she really is, whilst she is searching for her mother.
 
This is one heck of a book, with more twists and turns than a maize maze! There were some parts that were quite technical, but my husband was fascinated when I read them out to him, so I guess it's just not my strong point! Instead, I found the inter-personal relationships intriguing, especially when one of Skye's creche-mates turns up.
 
This is part of a series, so it does you no good to read this as a standalone. You need to have read the others for it to make sense. However, there were no editing or grammatical errors that disrupted my reading flow, and the pace and integrity of the characters are just what I have come to expect from Dean Murray. Ending on a cliffhanger, it will definitely leave you wanting more. Definitely recommended by me.
 
* A copy of this book was provided to me with no requirements for a review. I voluntarily read this book, and my comments here are my honest opinion. *
 
Merissa
Archaeolibrarian - I Dig Good Books!
Source: sites.google.com/site/archaeolibrarian/merissa-reviews/thefoundertheoutsiderabrokenworld45bydeanmurray
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review 2016-03-13 15:11
Biography for the mid-grade set
Mercy: The Incredible Story of Henry Bergh, Founder of the ASPCA and Friend to Animals - Nancy Furstinger,Vincent Desjardins

"Mercy" is a short biography of ASPCA founder Henry Bergh, aimed at the mid-grade set. Because it deals with animal cruelty, it is not always an easy or pleasant read.


Nevertheless, it paints a picture of the times in which Bergh lived and how unusual it was for anyone in his high social position to speak up on behalf of animals.

 

The book also contains some informative sidebars about contemporary historical figures like P.T. Barnum and Louisa May Alcott, as well as things like the history of political cartoons and circuses.

 

The watercolor illustrations are appropriate for a book aimed at younger readers, and there are also some excellent historical photographs included to show the basis for the interior paintings.

 

Nicely done, and a good introduction to the historical importance of the anti-cruelty movement.

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review 2013-10-24 23:38
Founder - Jodi Payne

Founder - Jodi Payne

 

Okay, published in 2007, I had missed this one. But it was not a great loss.

Aubrey is a great character and his mess and flaws are quite credible, I understand the dynamics between him and the family he works for. But the story with Kelly escapes me, mainly because I can't understand on what basis Kelly (a kid who can't accept NO for an answer from an unknown, alcoholic cuckold with anger issues) justifies his expectations, and because Aubrey feels terribly guilty rather than simply regretful. However, I could round up the "great character stupid plot" with 3 stars, but the fact that the two semi-decent sex scenes take place with two characters who are not Kelly doesn't make me feel guilty to give this book 2 stars. 

 

 

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