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text 2019-05-08 12:00
Reading progress update: I've read 1 out of 723 pages.
Metamorphoses - Denis Feeney,Ovid,David Raeburn

I'm actually on page xiv, the introduction, but that isn't easy to deal with...I wanted to note that Ovid was "the most famous poet in the world" in his lifetime, however.

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review 2018-08-21 18:27
Cleverus Dickus: "Metamorphoses (Norton Critical Edition)" by Ovid (Author), Charles Martin (Translator)
Metamorphoses: A New Translation - Ovid,Charles Martin,Bernard Knox


“God himself helps those who dare.” 


in "Metamorphoses (Norton Critical Edition)" by Ovid (Author), Charles Martin (Translator)


When I think on Ovid and Shakespeare, my own poetic streak resurfaces. Read at your own peril (word of warning: If you don't know either your Shakespeare or your Ovid, what follows won't make much sense):


Sentenced to exile! - be seated-
Let me roll back the years-
(Please lend me your ears)-
And give me the closure I've needed.

(...)

 

If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.

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review 2018-03-07 00:00
Tales from Ovid
Tales from Ovid - Ted Hughes The ancient Mediterranean world was sustained by potent myths which retain the power to grip our imaginations and provoke the deepest thoughts about our nature and circumstances; Ovid was one ancient writer who was able to tell these stories with immense skill. Ted Hughes has presented two dozen of his tales in modern English, using language and images which clearly belong to the late 20th Century but nevertheless carry the reader away into ancient ways of seeing and feeling. In his introduction, he explains that "Above all, Ovid was interested in passion. Or rather, what a passion feels like to the one possessed by it. Not just ordinary passion either, but human passion in extremis - passion where it combusts, or levitates, or mutates into an experience of the supernatural." ... "However impossible these intensities might seem to be on one level, on another, apparently more significant level Ovid renders them with compelling psychological truth and force." Ted Hughes deploys all his skill as a poet to convey this intensity to the modern reader.
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review 2018-03-07 00:00
Tales from Ovid
Tales from Ovid - Ted Hughes The ancient Mediterranean world was sustained by potent myths which retain the power to grip our imaginations and provoke the deepest thoughts about our nature and circumstances; Ovid was one ancient writer who was able to tell these stories with immense skill. Ted Hughes has presented two dozen of his tales in modern English, using language and images which clearly belong to the late 20th Century but nevertheless carry the reader away into ancient ways of seeing and feeling. In his introduction, he explains that "Above all, Ovid was interested in passion. Or rather, what a passion feels like to the one possessed by it. Not just ordinary passion either, but human passion in extremis - passion where it combusts, or levitates, or mutates into an experience of the supernatural." ... "However impossible these intensities might seem to be on one level, on another, apparently more significant level Ovid renders them with compelling psychological truth and force." Ted Hughes deploys all his skill as a poet to convey this intensity to the modern reader.
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text 2017-11-26 12:48
16 Tasks of the Festive Season - Square 10: Pancha Ganapati
The Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt's New World - Andrea Wulf
A Is for Arsenic: The Poisons of Agatha Christie - Kathryn Harkup
William Pitt the Younger: A Biography - William Hague
Metamorphoses - Denis Feeney,Ovid,David Raeburn
The Daughter of Time - Josephine Tey
Treffpunkt im Unendlichen. - Klaus Mann
Making History - Stephen Fry
Gilded Needles (Valancourt 20th Century Classics) - Christopher Fowler,Michael McDowell,Mike Mignola
Risiko: Roman - Steffen Kopetzky

Tasks for Pancha Ganapati: Post about your 5 favourite books this year and why you appreciated them so much. –OR– Take a shelfie / stack picture of the above-mentioned 5 favorite books.  (Feel free to combine these tasks into 1!

 

Inspired by Murder by Death's post this morning, I've pondered over my morning coffe which reads qualify as myfavourite books this year. Although there is still time for a truly great read to come up in the next month (I am looking at you, Winter by Ali Smith), below is my list of 5 (or, erm, 6) favourite books of 2017 (I have not considered re-reads for this, btw.):

 

The Invention of Nature by Andrea Wulf.

Although, I knew of Humboldt (and his brother), I had no idea of the extent of his influence on the sciences and of the adventures he went on to gain the deep understanding of the world that he did. I am still amazed at both. I am still amazed at the difficulties he faced. I am still amazed at everything I learned about his and his times from Wulf's extraordinary book. 

 

A is for Arsenic by Kathryn Harkup.

I love the works of Agatha Christie and I also love a good bit of science mixed with history - and this book had all of it. What is more, I particularly enjoyed how this book started a discussion with my mom (a retired chemical engineer) about all things chemistry and how scientific discovery changed crime fiction. For that alone, this book deserves 5 stars.

 

William Pitt the Younger by William Hague. 

One of the biggest surprises this year, not because of the subject (Pitt had been on my radar for quite some time) but because of the author. What I learned from Mr Hague's excellent account of Mr Pitt and the political landscape of Georgian Britain is that I may not agree with the author on everything (especially political outlook) but that this doesn't lessen my appreciation for the excellent work he has produced with this book. The sheer amount of research that must have gone into this is staggering. 

 

Metamorphoses by Ovid (tr. by David Raeburn)

This is the book that has taken me longest to read this year, but it is a book that demands a slow and deliberate read. Becoming reacquainted with the myths and legends of Ancient Greece and Rome has brought home how far we've come as a society, how much we still face the same issues, and how much I miss reading the "classics". 

 

The Daughter of Time by Josephine Tey.

As it turns out, my 2017 seemed to be geared towards a history side - and I loved it - with a mix of murder mystery thrown in for balance. Tey's book takes both and showed how a good "vintage" mystery can actually take a serious turn. Tey loved history and it shows when she used her laid-up Inspector to investigate not just the murder of the Princes in the Tower, but also how history itself is subjective and prone to be re-written for the benefit of propaganda ... and how easy it is to fall in line believing anything by virtue of it being repeated as truth over and over. 

A timely read for 2017.

 

Treffpunkt im Unendlichen by Klaus Mann.

I've been a fan of Klaus Mann's for a while, and in this book he shows how spot on his powers of observations were when he wrote about the times he lived in. Treffpunkt is one of the best books I have read to bring to life the Lost Generation in the late 1920s / early 1930s. Loved it.

 

 

 

Of course, there are some honourable mentions too:

 

Making History by Stephen Fry. 

 

Gilded Needles by Micheal McDowell (I'm still in love with basically every single book of McDowell's that has crossed my path.)

 

Risiko by Steffen Kopetzky 

 

 

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