logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Parks-
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-05-21 20:38
Book Review For: Of Demons & Stones by Anne L. Parks
Of Demons & Stones: A Tri-Stone Trilogy - Anne L. Parks


Of Demons & Stones by Anne L. Parks is book one in this continuing story of Kylie Tate and Alex Stone....so beware that there is a cliffhanger. I will honestly say that I loved this book and truly wanted their story to keep going. This is a lot of things going on in their story so it will be one you won't want to put down...so beware of that too. I just so happy to have found this author and can't wait for more of her books!

Kylie has been moving up in her company at a top criminal lawyer...but Kylie has to work still with her abusive ex boyfriend who almost killed her. Kylie kept it a secret from the firm due to threats from the ex boyfriend and the shame of his abuse attached with the story. Kylie has avoided all romantic encounters until she happens to meet Alex. Kylie is very much attracted to Alex but thinks that he wouldn't really give her a second look. But Alex it seems has started to notice her and asking her out. Kylie then thinks maybe he is staying with his one night affair reputation and that he might be the one to get her out into the dating world again. Kylie thinks this because she assumes this really wouldn't be very serious relationship for Alex.
Kylie finds soon enough that Alex is wanting more than just a few dates and she does too. But the ex boyfriend too has started to notice that she is seeing Alex and starts to be more confrontational that he has been since they dated.
This story has a lot of drama, love, hero trying to protect 'his women' and also it would seem a possible secret that Alex has told Kylie about.
"My honest review is for a special copy I voluntarily read."
https://www.amazon.com/gp/profile/A2HX0B5ELOPP5Z?ie=UTF8&ref_=sv_ys_3
https://www.facebook.com/RomanceBookReview
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1709181636033417/
https://twitter.com/soapsrus68
https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/1831318-sissy-s-romance-book-review-for-you
http://sissymaereads.blogspot.com/
https://romancebookreviewforyou.wordpress.com/
http://booklikes.com/blog
https://www.tumblr.com/blog/romancebookreviewforyoublog
https://plus.google.com/+SissyHicks
https://www.pinterest.com/u2soapsrus/

Source: www.amazon.com/Demons-Stones-Tri-Stone-Trilogy-ebook/dp/B0127X25IW/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1495394952&sr=8-1&keywords=Of+Demons+%26+Stones
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2017-05-10 12:36
10th May 2017
Topdog/Underdog - Suzan-Lori Parks

And as you walk yr road, as you live yr life, RELISH THE ROAD. And relish the fact that the road of yr life will probably be a windy road.

 

Suzan-Lori Parks

 

Happy 54th birthday, Suzan-Lori Parks! The playwright won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama for Topdog/Underdog. Throughout her career Parks has had enviable collaborators—James Baldwin was her college mentor, and she went on to write scripts for Spike Lee and Oprah Winfrey.

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-03-10 01:44
Say Nothing
Say Nothing - Brad Parks

Say Nothing by Brad Parks is a fun read. Say Nothing is a quick read. Say Nothing is an entertaining read. The “however” in these statements is that Say Nothing as a story is also implausible to the point that reality interferes with the story. I do have fun reading the book, suspending disbelief, ignoring the question of “really???”, and just going along. What more can I say?

 

Reviewed for Penguin First to Read program

 

Source: www.memoriesfrombooks.com/2017/03/say-nothing.html
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-02-13 16:11
The Emperor in Shadow
Yamada Monogatori: The Emperor in Shadow - Richard Parks

[I received a copy of this novel through NetGalley.]

First, please note this is not a standalone novel, contrary to what I thought when I requested it, but part of a series (and very likely the last volume). However, I didn't find it difficult to follow the story and understand the characters: when the narrator alludes to events of the past or people he had previously met, he always adds a couple of sentences, nothing too long, just enough for a reader to understand the context. So this was good with me.

The setting here is that of feudal Japan (the Emperor and his court, bushi, military governors, geisha and courtesans) with a dash of supernatural: ghosts and youkai are common knowledge, and onmyôji and priestesses have actual power. In this world, Yamada and his faithful friend Kenji are confronted to attempted murder and political intrigue, from the Ise temple to the capital and the Emperor's court; I found the mystery decent enough, not too complicated (my guesses about a few things turned out to be right) yet not too easy either for the characters to understand, without convenient deus ex machina bringing the answers (Yamada deducted those).

It took me a couple of weeks to read, but it definitely wasn't boring (that was much more a matter of having lots of things to do and needing to prioritise other books in the meantime). The events made sense, the characters were likeable, and even though it's not my favourite novel ever, it was entertaining and believable.

On the downside, there were instances of Yamada 'hiding' things from the reader, which I don't particularly appreciate in mystery novels, and the female characters, while attaching, didn't have much to do apart from conveniently be here when a specific piece of information was needed, or wait in their palace for the men to do all the work. Granted, the setting itself doesn't lend itself to a lot of female freedom (aristocratic constraints, expectations placed on princesses, and so on), but it didn't help.

Conclusion: Still enjoyable in spite of these flaws.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-02-09 02:05
A nightmare come to life for parents. A terrific thrilling read for everyone.
Say Nothing - Brad Parks

Since his debut novel, Faces of the Gone in 2009, I've considered myself a Brad Parks fan -- but when I heard that he was going to step away from his series for a stand-alone, I got a little nervous. Maybe I wasn't a Brad Parks fan -- maybe I was just a Carter Ross fan. Honestly, the parts of the Carter Ross novels that he doesn't narrate aren't my favorite. Also, we all know all too well that for every Suspect or Mystic River, series writers can give us a The Two Minute Rule or Shutter Island -- maybe grabbing this book was going to be a mistake.

 

Thankfully, it wasn't.

 

While working on this post, I saw this from Sue Grafton talking about Say Nothing: "Terrific book. Truly terrific. Tension throughout and tears at the end. What could be better than that?" I'm a little annoyed by this, honestly. That's pretty much how I was going to sum up things for this post. Frankly, I wish Grafton would focus her efforts on finding another 5 letters between X and Z rather than preemptively stealing my lines.

 

We meet Judge Scott Sampson a few minutes after the biggest crisis of his life has started -- and a few minutes before he leans about it. Once you get to learn Sampson a little, you'll see that the bar for biggest crisis for him is set a little higher than for most. He's informed that his twin children have been kidnapped and is provided some pretty compelling reasons to believe that he's under surveillance (and will soon be given even more reason to believe that). Basically, the message he gets is this: if you want to see you children alive and well, you will do what we tell you to with a case. There are a few tests he has to pass to demonstrate his compliance -- tests that may do lasting damage to his career. But Sampson is eager to prove that he will do whatever he's asked for his children, consequences notwithstanding.

 

This isn't going to be an overnight escapade -- in fact, for Sampson and his wife (how have I failed to mention Allison?), this is an ordeal of indefinite duration. The stress, the worry, the intense reaction to this situation begins taking its toll almost immediately. These pressures test their individual ethics, bring secrets to light, expose and exacerbate problems in their marriage, and generally bring them both to the breaking point. They are also both driven to discover their inner-Liam Neeson in order to get their daughter (and son) back -- neither, really possess a particular set of skills fitting this goal, sadly. These attempts just make their personal and interpersonal woes worse -- and their lives continue spinning out of their control.

 

There is a relentlessness to the pace that's a pleasure -- and a drain. Jack Reacher gets a good night's sleep and enjoys coffee (and the less than occasional romantic interlude), Harry Bosch has jazz to relax him, Elvis Cole has that cat and Tai Chi -- as intense as things may get, by and large these guys get a break. But for Scott and Allison -- their children don't stop being kidnapped, and whatever solace they might find in alcohol, sleep or family -- it's a temporary band-aid at best.

 

This doesn't mean that it's not an enjoyable read -- Scott is a charming character and you will like him as you learn more about his life and family. You will not approve of every move he makes here (I guess you might, but I hope you don't), but on the whole you will understand why he makes them and won't judge him too harshly. Whoops, I was talking about tone here -- I had fun with this, even as I was feeling a shadow of the pressure Scott and Allison are under, I even laughed once. There's a real sense of peril when the narration focuses on the children -- but it never feels exploitative.

 

Like most readers will, I had a couple of pretty compelling theories about who was behind everything (and why), and focused on the correct one pretty early on. Which didn't stop me from being taken aback when it Parks revealed it -- he really handled that well. Another weakness comes in the last couple of pages where Parks ties up a few loose ends, and a couple of them feel too tidy. But it's instantly forgivable, and you want these characters to have something tidy after all they've gone through. On the whole, however, the characters and situations are complex and real (if heightened) -- Parks nailed this whole thing. I think this will hold up to at least one repeat reading -- the second read might even be more rewarding since you can appreciate what Parks is doing without being distracted by wondering what'll happen.

 

The tears that Grafton mentioned? Yeah, she got that part right, too.

 

This is a thriller filled with real people and situations that you can believe. You'll run the emotional gamut a time or two while reading this and will wish you could read faster just so you can make sure these kids make it home. I think I like the Carter Ross books more than this, but it's in Say Nothing that Parks finds his stride as a crime fiction writer. Really well done.

 

By the way, It turns out that I am a fan of Brad Parks. Phew.

 

Disclaimer: I received this eARC from Dutton via NetGalley in exchange for this post -- thanks to both for this, although my Primary Care Physician probably isn't crazy about what it did to my blood pressure.

Source: irresponsiblereader.com/2017/02/08/say-nothing-by-brad-parks
More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?