logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Quanah-Parker
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2013-12-20 15:21
Amazon eBook Sale, Which I Can Now Pretend is a Gift I Had Planned All Along
The Searchers: The Making of an American Legend - Glenn Frankel

I heard a really interesting interview with the author of this book, which tells the story of the Fort Parker Massacre and the 1836 kidnapping of 9 year old Cynthia Ann Parker, as well as the 1956 film that was based on the incident. Parker was "rescued" when she was 34, but she didn't want to return, because she had married, had three children, and had spent more time as a member of her tribe than in "white society." The story is incredibly tragic because she no longer fit into the world she'd been taken from as a child, and she missed her children. Or so I interpret it from what I've read previously.

 

This was a perfect gift for my mother. When she lived in Oklahoma she'd taught elementary school, and one of her students was a descendant of Quanah Parker, one of Cynthia Ann's children and a famous leader. And we have many relatives living in east Texas, not far from the Fort Parker area. Plus I wanted to read it too, and at this price I could buy us both a copy. 

 

It's one of those books that I've only peeked at the writing, but am basing my purchase on how interesting the author interview was, and how well he presented the history. So I felt it was a good risk. I've managed to dig up that interview:

 

The Murky True Story Behind The Searchers

Slate Magazine, March 28, 2013 (audio soundcloud link on that page)

 

eBook link: The Searchers

Amazon US price currently: $2.99

 

If you're not interested in the book that audio gives an interesting account of the facts.

 

But now I'm back to the "so many books, so little time" delima and this book goes into the queue. (This is a problem that's not really a problem of course. But at least it's one problem I can fixate on and enjoy trying to solve.)

Like Reblog Comment
review 2013-03-13 00:00
Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History
Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History - S.C. Gwynne Very factual but overall underwhelming. Very little of the book dealt with Quanah, while most of it dealt with military events in unnecessarily minute detail. The writing quality at the sentence level was often confusing and sloppy. The "real story" should have been (SPOILER ALERT) Quanah Parker's complete transformation from violent warrior of the plains into a docile white mans pet. That was the real story and that's what I hoped to get insight into, but no commentary was offered. It was not a biography of Quanah Parker. It was a military history of the Texas - Commanche battles of the middle 1800's and it should have been publicized as such. Ok, I admit. I learned a few things but it could have been a decent National Geographic article, not a full length book. Very interesting subject matter but handled only fair, in my opinion.
Like Reblog Comment
review 2012-01-28 00:00
Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History
Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History - S.C. Gwynne I picked up Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Tribe in American History by S.C. Gwynne because it has some relevance to me since Quanah Parker was born very close to where I grew up. Oklahoma has a lot of Native American history, and I thought Empire of the Summer Moon would make for a very interesting read.Y’all, this book was fascinating. Seriously. I know fangirling over a non-fiction book like this makes me the biggest nerd ever – but I’m okay with that.Empire of the Summer Moon chronicles how the Comanches started out as the little kids that got picked on in elementary school (in the 16th-17th centuries) to the crazy vengeful high school bullies with long memories that basically defeated everyone in their path. (That transformation brought to you by the introduction of the horse.)Seriously, the Comanches learned how to work with horses better than any other Indian tribe – far better. They then basically dominated their way through the 18th century. Other Indians, the Spanish – whoever they came across they fought and won.A lot of the negative reviews of Empire of the Summer Moon that I came across claim that the book is biased against Indians. Maybe I wasn’t being sensitive enough to the issue – but I found such claims completely unwarranted. The book certainly cataloged a lot of brutality on the Indians part – but a lot of times I felt an undercurrent of respect for how resourceful they could be. There were also times (Chapter 6 for example) when details of Texan soldiers needlessly slaughtering peaceful Indian tribes (such as the Cherokees) were covered. Not to mention the discussion about the absolute ineptitude of the Office of Indian Affairs (Chapter 15).From the rise of John Coffee Hays and the Texas Rangers to the kidnapping of Cynthia Ann Parker (for a fictionalized account of her life with the Comanches, check out Ride the Wind by Lucia St. Clair Robson) to the Comanche’s final surrender – this is a comprehensive guide to the Comanches if I ever saw one.Seriously, I loved Empire of the Summer Moon so much I could talk about it for ages. I almost wish I’d read it for a class instead of on my own! If S.C. Gwynne publishes another historical nonfiction book – you better believe I’ll be all over it.
Like Reblog Comment
review 2011-09-01 00:00
Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History - S.C. Gwynne Now this seems to be okay - the first big tick goes to the un.automated voiceNot really finding out about objective facts about the Comanches as a people or culture. Contents:Scalp, Rape, Scalp, Rape,Axe, Scalp, Spear,Flay,Rape, Scalp ad infinitum1.5*
Like Reblog Comment
review 2011-04-19 00:00
Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History - S.C. Gwynne Pulitzer nominee. Like the idea, but I'd like to see a review or two.
More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?