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Search tags: R.G.-Green
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review 2017-11-15 04:24
Let it Snow by John Green, Maureen Johnson & Lauren Myracle

 

"The Jubilee Express" by Maureen Johnson - 3/5 Stars
I liked the story, thought it was cute-ish, but did not like how the main character stereotyped cheerleaders. It was another one of those "I'm not like those girls" type of thing. I really hate when people do that. Just because someone is pretty, wears make up and likes to be perky and do cheers, doesn't make them a bad person or make them less than you. That goes for any person/group who is different from you. Don't be so quick to judge. It was also annoying how the author basically said all cheerleaders are named Amber and Madison. Of course, I know nothing about cheerleaders, so...

I was really cringing throughout the story, because I was expecting her to cheat on her boyfriend; the story just gave that vibe.

Luckily there was no cheating

(spoiler show)

.

I liked Stuart as a character. He seemed genuinely like a good person.

The whole thing with the Christmas village was different.

I like the writing style and think it would be fun to expand it to a full length novel and really expand on the character developments, and have it not be so instalove.

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"A Cheertastic Christmas Miracle" by John Green - 1/5 stars.
Did John Green really write this? It was horrible and gross. Are boys really like that about cheerleaders? Anyways, it just made me feel a little disgusted how the girls are being treated/are viewed because they happen to be cheerleaders. Also saying "that's so gay"... ugh, and it was used more than once. I also did not appreciate the dig at Lindsay Lohan. Sure the likelihood, Lindsay will ever read this is slim, but it's a pretty crappy thing to do. She's still a person and the story basically called her a slut. "Legs always open." So John Green lost a little of my respect.

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"The Patron Saint of Pigs" by Lauren Myracle - 2.5/5 stars.
The main character was really painful to read. I mean, I guess she learned her lesson in the end, at least I hope so. I didn't really care much for it, but I did like the ending somewhat with everyone coming together.

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review 2017-11-14 17:51
To Green Angel Tower / Tad Williams
To Green Angel Tower - Tad Williams

As the evil minions of the undead Sithi Storm King prepare for the kingdom-shattering culmination of their dark sorceries and King Elias is drawn ever deeper into their nightmarish, spell spun world, the loyal allies of Prince Josua desperately struggle to rally their forces at the Stone of Farewell. And with time running out, the remaining members of the now devastated League of the Scroll have also gathered there to unravel mysteries from the forgotten past in an attempt to find something to strike down their unslayable foe.

But whether or not they are successful, the call of battle will lead the valiant followers of Josua Lackhand on a memorable trek to the haunted halls of Asu'a itself - the Sithi's greatest stronghold.

 

A satisfying ending to an engaging trilogy. I can see why this final tome was originally published in two parts—it was a definite door-stop! I sprained my wrist two years ago, and I found that old injury aching at the end of lengthy reading sessions!

However, the size of the volume was necessary in order to tie up the many, many loose ends from the first two books. I especially appreciated the return of “Rachel the Dragon” as an honoured elder lady, even as I grieved the loss of other characters. I also have to say that I appreciated the focus on Miriamele, despite the fact that she often came across as spoiled and irrational. I was able to endure that portrayal because Simon was often angry and petulant for no particular reason that I could discern either. Equal opportunity bad behaviour!

I appreciated that Osten Ard was not just a clone of Middle Earth. Williams gave the world his own structure and rules, and created unique creatures and challenges for his characters. I really liked the ending--it worked for me. I always feel the tug of emotion as the war ends and the circle of friends must split up to return to their own lives—happy to get back to normal, sad to be parted.

Book number 267 in my Science Fiction & Fantasy reading project.

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review 2017-11-14 16:56
All Good Deeds
All Good Deeds (A Lucy Kendall Thriller) (Lucy Kendall #1) (The Lucy Kendall Series) - Stacy Green
The Four Just Men - Edgar Wallace

Quite by chance, I started on All Good Deeds   while in the middle of re-reading Edgar Wallace's The Four Just Men, so I had a couple of days of vigilante justice delivered in two very different styles, one set in Edwardian London in 1914, the other in present-day Pennsylvania. And while the heroes of the London story are cultured middle-aged males (there are only three of them, actually) the protagonist of the modern story is a pushy, opinionated young woman who goes rushing in where "just men" would – no, not fear to tread, but certainly think very, very carefully before they trod.

 

Lucy's one concern – and It's become an obsession – is abused children. Years ago when she was working for the Child Protection Services, she was responsible for monitoring a boy of eleven who had been allowed to go on living with his family against her advice and had then murdered his nine-year-old sister. The boy, Justin, subsequently spent several years in juvenile prison but was later released back into society without being tagged as a child-molester. Lucy fought against his release because she considered him a danger but she was overuled by the judge.

 

Now a nine-year-old girl called Kailey has disappeared, been kidnapped, and Justin not only lives right there in the immediate neighbourhood but turns out to have been in direct contact with the girl prior to her disappearance.

 

So far as Lucy is concerned, she was right all along and this is an open-and-shut case. When she learns that the Detective in charge of the investigation is Justin's half-brother and that he insists there is no evidence against Justin, she starts taking things into her own hands. Not for the first time. Several pedophiles who had evaded official justice have already met their maker after a brief encounter with her.

 

But further developments sow doubts in the reader's mind about Justin being in any real sense a pedophile, or dangerous. And a young man approaches Lucy in a bar and informs her that he knows her secret: a word from him to the police would result in Lucy being arrested and charged with a whole series of murders.

 

The reader is torn in two.

 

Great writing.

 

But the moral of the story? All Good Deeds is described as "a psychological thriller". I'm not sure what that means. That the bad guys have psychological problems? Well, yes, but so does Lucy, when judged by normal standards of behaviour in any civilised society.

 

I wonder where this will go in the second book in the series ...

 

And The Four Just Men? It is a classic. A little slow perhaps (life then was slower) but essential reading. If you haven't read it, read it. You can download it almost free from Amazon and completely free here.

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review 2017-11-13 06:36
Bog Bodies Uncovered by Miranda Aldhouse-Green
Bog Bodies Uncovered: Solving Europe's Ancient Mystery - Miranda Aldhouse-Green

TITLE:  Bog Bodies Uncovered:  Solving Europe's Ancient Mystery

 

AUTHOR:  Miranda Aldhouse-Green 

 

DATE PUBLISHED:  2015

 

FORMAT: e-book

 

ISBN-13:  978-0-500-05182-5

 

______________________

 

Miranda Aldhouse-Green takes a look at the mystery of the bog bodies:  how and where they were discovered; the world the bog people lived in; crime scene investigation of the bodies, how bog environments preserve bodies; whether the bog bodies were accident execution or murder victims; the ways they were killed; who might have done the deeds; and why this was done. 

 

The book is interesting and informative, with a great deal of research/references and many photographs.  However, there is also a great deal of speculation, repetition and no definitive answers.  In short, we don't know much about the bog bodies other than the manner of their deaths, but there is a great deal of speculation, and most certainly no solving of any mystery.  Did I mention all the repetition?  

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review 2017-11-12 14:47
"Schlaft gut, ihr fiesen Gedanken": Feinfühliger Roman über eine Jugendliche mit Angststörungen
Schlaft gut, ihr fiesen Gedanken - John ... Schlaft gut, ihr fiesen Gedanken - John Green,Sophie Zeitz

Wie fühlt es sich an, seine Gedanken und Ängste nicht unter Kontrolle zu haben? John Green gelingt mit „Schlaft gut, ihr fiesen Gedanken“ ein sensibles Portrait eines Teenagers mit Zwangsstörungen. Azas Gedankenspiralen lassen sich sehr gut nachvollziehen.

 

Das im Klappentext angeteaserte Verschwinden eines Milliardärs stellt allerdings nur die Rahmenhandlung dar und spielt eine untergeordnete Rolle. Im Mittelpunkt steht Aza, die durch ihre Angststörungen kein normales Leben führen kann. Doch nicht nur ihre eigenen Erfahrungen prägen das Buch, sondern auch die Auswirkungen der psychischen Krankheit auf Azas Umfeld – auf ihre Mutter, ihre beste Freundin und ihr Freund. Da die Angehörigen Betroffener oft in den Hintergrund rücken und deren Schwierigkeiten meist eine untergeordnete Rolle spielen, haben mir die unterschiedlichen Perspektiven auf Azas Problem gut gefallen.

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