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Search tags: R.G.-Green
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review 2018-06-19 17:40
An Intimate Look at the Victims
Green River, Running Red: The Real Story of the Green River Killer--America's Deadliest Serial Murderer - Ann Rule

This was a really good true crime book, the main reason why I didn't give it five stars is that there was too much filler in here for me towards the end. A good 20 percent of this book could have deleted (after we get into the 1990s) since we all should know at this point that Ridgway (the Green River Killer) didn't get arrested until 2001 and was not convicted until 2003. Depending on the book I don't mind when Rule segues into the lives of the police officers who are responsible for apprehending these killers, this time though there was a lot of repetitiveness that ended up boring me to tears. 

 

"Green River, Running Red" is a look at the Green River Killer who murdered 71 women in Washington State in the 1980s and 1990s. Rule gives us an intimate look at these women and in some cases teens. We find out what drove many of them to the streets and how they got involved with prostitution. I find it appalling how little people seemed to care that prostitutes were being murdered. Ridgway purposely chose women in this profession since besides hating them, he thought no one would notice them going missing and if they did, would not care. Rule manages to have you feel nothing but sympathy for these women and their family who would not know for years or decades in some cases about what happened to their daughters/mothers/sisters. I loved that Rule added in pictures before she got into the history of each woman. I also found myself hoping for a different outcome once I got caught up in all of their lives. 

 

Rule smartly does not make Ridgway the focus of this book. Every couple of chapters or so we peek back in at Ridgway to see where he is in his life, but he is depicted as a malevolent ghost for most of the story before Rule goes into how he was finally apprehended. 

 

I do think in this case going into the Green River Task Force could have been cut way down in this final book. They really didn't find anything to go on with Ridgway for a long time, so reading about other suspects wasn't interesting. I also thought Rule carried the water for the police a bit too much in this book. She also weirdly takes potshots at Robert Keppel who enlisted Ted Bundy who provided some insights into the Green River Killer before his death. Keppel even wrote a book about it entitled "The Riverman". 

 

The ending of the book goes into Ridgway going out with law enforcement and finding the locations of other victims and him recounting how he murdered them.

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text 2018-06-14 19:20
TBR Thursday
Wizard's First Rule - Terry Goodkind
Dora Doralina - Rachel de Queiroz
The Bourne Identity - Robert Ludlum
The Hazel Wood - Melissa Albert
Looking for Alaska - John Green

My reading life is still being driven by due dates!  I have 5 days to read Wizard's First Rule, which is quite a thick book, so I'm feeling a bit of pressure.

 

Dora, Doralina is an interlibrary loan, which I'm unable to renew, so its next.

 

Then, finally, I get to read one of the Summer of Spies books, The Bourne Identity, which I'm hoping will be a quick read. 

 

I can hardly wait to read The Hazel Wood because, well, fairies.  I do love the Fae!

 

Finally, my real-life book club choice: Looking for Alaska.  (I may also have to read The Name of the Star quickly, as I think we're combining our July & August meetings.  One of our members is moving to Italy and we want to have a suitable send off for her.)

 

Combine this with changes in guests for the conference that I'm headed to in August  (Deanna Raybourn is no longer going to be a guest of honour, but Tasha Alexander and Andrew Grant will be) and I'm scrambling to fit in a book or 2 by them before mid-August.

 

My reading time in indeed spoken for and I'm longing to get spying!

 

Have a great weekend!

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review 2018-06-13 01:47
First Contact by Kat Green
First Contact (Haunts for Sale Series) - Kat Green,Kat de Falla

Part murder mystery, part ghost story, this tale had me interested from the beginning. Sloane is an independently minded woman with one exception: she’s still grieving and still attached to her dead fiance Michael. She’s taken a job investigating a house for paranormal activity and she is hoping that dead Michael will put in an appearance. I guess if you’re a paranormal investigator, you would have issues letting go of the dead above and beyond most people.

So while Sloane is pining away for Michael, there’s definitely some ghost action going on in this house and that leads her to start asking questions. Apparently this little Wisconsin town has several unsolved disappearances. These young ladies went missing and now Sloane believes she has found their ghosts.

Even as the murder mystery spins up, it quickly spins out. The cast of characters is small and it quickly becomes apparent who the culprit is. I would have liked a bit more time for the mystery to develop and play out. I didn’t get much suspense because the culprit was quickly revealed (and it wasn’t a big surprise either).

The rest of the tale is about Sloane trying to escape the bad guys and that’s about half the book. There’s added drama over Michael and her undying love for him. But then there’s a silly love triangle tossed in too. FBI Agent Jonah, Michael’s best friend, is the guy that taught Sloane most of what she knows about the paranormal. They usually do paranormal investigations together but Sloane is branching out a bit now with her business of investigating potentially haunted houses that are on the market (because buyers want to know if they have to live with spirits). And then the love drama is even a little more silly because Jonah’s FBI partner is a knock-out and Sloane is jealous of her. I really didn’t care for the romance drama because it took Sloane’s character down a notch. She went from this savvy paranormal investigator, independent business woman, etc. to being this childish, jealous idiot who makes fun of Jonah’s coworker. Sigh… ugh! Sloane, you’re better than that!

By the end, I was glad that the ghosts got some payback and that Sloane had worked out her romantic issues. The pacing started off good but then dragged a little with romantic entanglement stuff but then picked up again at the end. 4/5 stars.

The Narration: Kate Tyler was OK. She has a good voice for Sloane and she did a decent job with emotions. Her other character voices were sometimes spot on and sometimes not. Her pacing was just a touch off as she hesitates here and there. 4/5 stars.

I received this audiobook as part of my participation in a blog tour with Audiobookworm Promotions. The tour is being sponsored by Kat Green. The gifting of this audiobook did not affect my opinion of it.

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review 2018-06-12 16:26
Zombie Kids Go Green by Julia Dweck
Zombie-Kids Go Green (KiteReaders Monster Series) - Julia Dweck

Zombie Kids Go Green is about a group of zombie kids that help clean up the environment they are in. The book is written in prose and is quite short. I couldn't find any purchase links, and frankly, it's been on my Kindle so long now that I don't recall how I acquired it. 

It's written in prose and it's lovely.

The author uses clever words to engage the reader, young or old, and teaches them even smelly zombies love the Earth enough to care for it.

The illustrations are awesome too.  Great job, Mark Draisey.

I really enjoyed this little book a lot. If you're a zombie fan, check it out.

 

 

Source: www.fredasvoice.com/2018/06/zombie-kids-go-green-by-julia-dweck-26.html
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review 2018-06-03 02:46
The Golden Slipper and Other Problems for Violet Strange
The Golden Slipper and Other Problems for Violet Strange - Anna Katharine Green

I read one of the Violet Strange short stories last year as part of an anthology (I can't remember which one); it was my first introduction to Anna Katherine Green's work and I liked it enough that I wanted to read more.  In that story, (The Intangible Clew), Strange showed a distinctive Sherlock Holmes flair, and I was intrigued.  

 

I've found and read a couple of her books and loved them, but it took longer to find a copy of this book - the one I most wanted to read - that was available and affordable.  I'd heard it wasn't her best work, and sadly, I have to agree; the first story in fact was just down right rubbish, the second one only a little bit better: more coherent but absurdly plotted.

 

But Anna Katherine Green did two things - one of them something I've personally not seen before, which accounts for my slightly high rating.  The first is that every story got better than the one before it - the improvement in the writing and plotting is obvious, and one of these days I'll sit down and do the google-fu necessary to find out if these stories were early efforts, and therefore show a natural progression in her writing, or if there's some other reason.  But as the book goes on the stories get exponentially better.

 

The second thing that elevated the book for me was that each story was a complete stand-alone short story (except the very last one).  Any of them could be read cold and the reader would miss nothing.  But when read together, there's a thin plot that holds them all together, and, it turns out, a romance; one that's hardly hinted at in any of the stories until the second-last.  The last story isn't really a story at all, but Violet's coda in the form of a letter, explaining her motives for taking on the cases.

 

This subtle dichotomy made the uneven collection feel more finely crafted than it really was, and in spite of its flaws it feels clever and fresh.  The writing is a little more florid than the other AKG books I've read so far, and she breaks the fourth wall constantly; something I didn't mind but occasionally felt a little condescending-ish.

 

So - not brilliant, not her best work by far, but interesting and worth experiencing and definitely worth the effort I made to read it.

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