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Search tags: R.G.-Green
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text 2017-09-21 17:33
Mr. Green, you are definitely not Lovecraft.
Ghost of a Chance - Simon R. Green

I have read and enjoyed other works by Green. This book I have read. What was the most difficult for me was the speech styles. "The chain of events opened a door, and now Something from the Past is forcing its way through, into the Present!", "An ancient Presence, powerful and pitiless, demanding worship and sacrifice, blood and horror. Out of the Past, out of Time, come to drag Humanity down to its own level again", "I'm getting definite indications of Time shifts. Intrusions from the Past. Some recent, some not. And underneath all that... I'm reading Deep Time, JC. From long before this station even existed. This is bad, JC, seriously bad. I've never seen so many extreme readings in one place before."

 

That's just in the first three chapters of the book. Later on their speech does creep up to match the modern timeframe of the story, but the overemphasis on "OMG!!!" sits there all along. Each new thing they encounter in the London Underground is always more than anything they've ever seen before. And these are supposed to be seasoned field agents? Green tries to get around that by frequently reinforcing that they are a B-team and only there because there was absolutely no one else. Same with their enemies from a rival organization. That team is also there because there's no one else and they're an effective B-team. However, two Bs do not an A make.

 

Add in some over the top descriptions, more than one info dump, a deus ex machina and an barely believable team up and the story just falls apart. Which is sad, because I know Green can do better and the idea had so much potential. In the end, it felt like Green was trying to be Lovecraft, rather than paying homage to his style. Bad choice all around.

 

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review 2017-09-09 06:02
A Family Affair
Daemons Are Forever - Simon R. Green

This was brilliant. I believe that's not an overstatement. This second book in the Secret Histories series illustrates that you either like Simon R. Green or you don't. His sense of humor might turn off some readers, and some of the prose can have a repetitive aspect. I think he likes to repeat things for emphasis. I had to look this up. It's called analepsis: repetition of a word or phrase for emphasis. Yeah, Green loves analepsis. As for me, everything I love about him is showcased in this novel. His silly but clever sense of humor. His belief in heroism. His cynical viewpoint of human nature. His understanding of the way people think. His love for fairy tales, mythology, folklore. His ability to write horror in a way that really gets you in the gut. His kooky characterization. It's all here.

The intersection of fantasy and spy literature is very appealing about this book. It's clear that Green loves Bond and can also poke fun at its motifs and conventions in a way that only a Bond fan can. I like that this is a part of the story, but it doesn't stay in pastiche territory. There's a nod to it several times, but Green has something a lot more interesting to explore with this book. He even throws in a little Lovecraftianesque elements.

The story starts with Eddie trying to pull his family back together and get the Droods back on track. He gets a lot of resistance in this endeavor, but Eddie is not the type to give up. He has Molly Metcalfe, the Witch of the Woods at his side, and some help from his uncle Jack, the Armorer. The rest of the Droods are more than happy to watch Eddie fall on his face. Eddie knows what many of us had to figure out for ourselves, family complicates our lives, makes us crazy, but they're family, so you can't just walk away from them, unless you have to.

Eddie decides they need a big bad to fight, so he decides they'll take on the Loathely Ones. I can't tell you more, because so very much happens and you'd have to read it to even get it. So much goes into this one.

I listened to this on audio, and I'm so glad I did. At first I was meh about the narrator. But he won me over but good. He's British, and also talented in voicing many dialects. Each character sounds distinctive, and he even changes the cadence of the speaker. He knows how to build drama, and also inject sarcasm and pathos into the dialogue and prose.

This was awesome action, now shying away from gore, but also quite horrific at times. I think the action balance was better in this one than The Man with the Golden Torc. Green takes more time with the exposition, and that's very crucial with this story. Eddie has a lot of plotting and planning to do, and he can't make these decisions on the fly. The fantasy is solid and the ideas are all over the place, but everything comes together very nicely. I was pretty upset about one character death, and I don't think Eddie is going to take what happened lightly or let it go. Revenge is a dish best served cold. The characters are all interesting, and add something to the story. If you think a character is wasted, keep reading and wait for it.

I really enjoyed the relationship between Eddie and Molly. They challenge each other, support each other, and accept each other, which is crucial, considering who both of them are. I think Eddie would be screwed in many cases without Molly, and while she's very independent, it's clear that Eddie is very important to her.

This is a crap review and I need to recharge my laptop. I'll end it by saying I loved this book and it just makes me love Simon R. Green even more than I already do. Highly recommended.

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text 2017-07-21 07:51
Agents of Light and Darkness - Simon R. Green

It's been years since I read Something From the Nightside but I found it easy to slip back into the world without having to re-read the first book for refreshers. I really enjoy that. I also enjoyed this story. Not very long but a fast read, lots of action. Nice bits of background drops, not just on the main character, kept it interesting. Learning about all the ways John Taylor's gift for finding things can be used makes you realize that there's more than just people and objects that can't be hidden from him. The entities hunting him are the reason he doesn't make his life easy and use his gift each time someone hires him, which gives him depth. Add in the Unholy Grail, which is the cup of Judas, rather than the Holy Grail, the cup of Christ, and you have an interesting target. I think this is the first story I've run across that centered on the Last Supper that didn't revolve around the Holy Grail, and I found it a breath of fresh air.

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url 2017-06-07 13:05
90+ new releases in book series this week
White Trash Zombie Unchained - Diana Rowland
Only Skein Deep - Maggie Sefton
Moonbreaker - Simon R. Green
Indecent Exposure - Stuart Woods
An Unnatural Vice (Sins of the Cities) - KJ Charles
A Scandal in Battersea - Mercedes Lackey
A Peace Divided - Tanya Huff
Inked Expressions - Carrie Ann Ryan
The Kill Society - Richard Kadrey
Tyrant's Throne - Sebastien de Castell

See the fictfact new release calendar at https://www.fictfact.com/BookReleaseCalendar for full list.

Source: www.fictfact.com/BookReleaseCalendar
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review 2017-05-15 23:00
HOME IMPROVEMENT UNDEAD EDITION - VARIOUS AUTHORS
Home Improvement: Undead Edition - Simon R. Green,Heather Graham,James Grady,Charlaine Harris,S.J. Rozan,Rochelle Krich,Toni L.P. Kelner,E.E. Knight,Victor Gischler,Stacia Kane,Melissa Marr,Suzanne McLeod,Seanan McGuire,Patricia Briggs

Anthology The rating I'll round up to 3 but only a few of the stories were worth reading

1. If I Had a Hammer, Charlaine Harris (Sookie Stackhouse #13.1). It's been awhile since I read a Sookie book so this was really nice to read about her now. Even though I thought I'd everything out there this story was new. I liked it, I just wish the Sookie wouldn't be hypocritical where other people are concerned. Sookie even acknowledges it but is more like, "Oh well, that's how I think." Very good story. 4 stars.

2. Wizard Home Security, Victor Gischler. A wizard is robbed, pays for security, is trapped by the security and then thwarts the robber. Super short. 3 stars.

3. Gray, Patricia Briggs: (Mercy Thompson universe). A very good story about a female vampire who moves back home hoping to find some peace. 4 stars.

4. Squatters' Rights, Rocelle Krich. A story about a house with a bad history and how that affects the new owners. I have no idea what was going on with the "squatters". 2 stars.

5. Blood on the Wall, Heather Graham. A mild mannered detective stops a killer that's targeting a fake demon cult. We never figure out why they were targeted in the first place. 2 stars.

6. The Mansion of Imperatives, James Grady. A strange story that I think the author was trying to make scary but didn't really suceed. 2 stars.

7. The Strength Inside, Melissa Marr. Sisters and the children they take care of are trying to improve their home and use unconventional (or should I say ancient) methods to do so. Strange story. 3 stars.

8. Woolsey's Kitchen Nightmare, EE Knight. Morbid and flippant don't usually go together and they don't in my opinion. 2 stars.

9. Through This House, Seanan McGuire (October Daye #4.5) A good story about Goldengreen and some of the horrors that took place there. 4 stars

10. The Path, S J Rozan. I really tried to read this story but it was soooo slooowww. I just gave up. No rating.

11. Rick the Brave, Stacia Kane (Downside #5.5) I miss Terrible and Chess! Please Stacia Kane, write another book in their series!!! This is a short story about a home improvement project that goes bad. 5 stars.

12. Full-Scale Demolition, Suzanne McLeod (Spellcrackers) Cute story about a Sidhe who's job is to round up fae that are causing a commotion. There's a kelpie that the heroine is attracted to if she can get beyond the kelpie tendencies to drown people. Throw in a couple of lamias and children to rescue - it should have been a lot of fighting but mostly it was getting hit, passing out and then waking up. (Another book I'm reading has the same passing out theme. A little frustrating.) 3-1/2 stars.

13. It's All in the Rendering, Simon Green. This couple lives and works in a sanctuary house for the normal and paranormal world. Both sides inspect the home and say all kinds of changes need to be done. The couple and the guests discuss different options, end up doing nothing and that's what works. What the frick!? 2 stars

14. In Brightest Day, Tony Kelner. The author was trying to write humor for the main character or at least make her humorous. To me, it didn't work. And bringing back the same guy over and over was really cruel. The reason didn't seem enough for me. 2 stars.

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