logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: R.J.-Anderson
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2020-07-29 11:31
Uncomfortable truths written in easily understood language
White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide - Carol Anderson

The thrust of this easy to read and highly informative book is that power structures in America and disenfranchised whites have one thing that bind them together, a determination to prevent African-American success. The chapters take us from the end of the civil war and the reconstruction through to the first black president in the US, Obama. It studies the gymnastics, sleight of hand, and frequently extremely violent terrorist acts involved in maintaining segregation after in was legally outlawed in the 1960s, and how a coup in Nicaragua was tied into criminalising black communities in the US. The more left-wing of us might wonder at the restraint of African-Americans at times, and this book delves into the history of that and how every act of resistance in the last 350 years has been met with disproportionate, murderous punishment in order to protect white communities against even the discomfort of black success. It's a great book if you're wondering how we arrived at the BLM movement today.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2020-06-19 20:16
#FridayReads - June 19, 2020
Birth of the Butterfly - Mimi Milan
Proper English - K.J. Charles
The A.I. Who Loved Me - Alyssa Cole
New Year, Same Trash: Resolutions I Absolutely Did Not Keep (A Vintage Short Original) - Samantha Irby
Once Upon a Wedding: A Fiction From the Heart Second Chances Anthology - Priscilla Oliveras,Jamie Beck,Falguni Kothari,Sonali Dev,Sally Kilpatrick,Tracy Brogan,K.M. Jackson,Hope Ramsay,Barbara Samuel,Donna Kauffman
Love By the Letters: A Regency Novella Trio - Kelly Bowen,Vanessa Riley,Grace Burrowes
Beneath a Ruthless Sun - Gilbert King
One Person, No Vote: How Voter Suppression Is Destroying Our Democracy - Carol Anderson Ph.D.,Dick Durbin

It's Juneteenth, the day the last enslaved person was told the war was over and they were free. Yesterday, I attended (via Zoom) a panel discussion organized by Next Gen Climate Action Committee, a political action group my friend works for, on Celebrating Juneteenth and Ensuring Black Voices in Progressive Spaces. It was a great discussion and I am glad my friend invited me, considering I live in Kansas and the group works in VA on VA matters/policies. Rep Don Scott really spoke to my head and heart and he was on for just a few minutes. 

 

It's rainy and much cooler here, so no poolside reading today. I've got a beef soup simmering in the slow cooker for dinner; just have to whip up some cornbread to go with it and I am good to go. Spending the day reading and tonight I am going to watch Soledad O'Brien's documentary on the early days of COVID-19 in the US (it is airing on Hearst stations, so I am hoping to catch it streaming online).

 

Tomorrow is Litha/Summer Solstice and I have plans: including a hamburger picnic (using a plant-based "ground beef") and making Lemon-Ginger-Raspberry Zinger sun tea, while reading in the sunshine. Sunday is Father's Day, so I making a special easy breakfast for the hubby to enjoy, followed by pool time and a nice dinner. 

 

I'm finishing up Birth of the Butterfly for BL-opoly, then taking the weekend off from the game; right after that I want to knock out finally Proper English by KJ Charles. For COYER #BLM RAT, I am reading The A.I. Who Loved Me by Alyssa Cole and New Year, Same Trash by Samantha Irby. That's my weekend. 

 

Next week I will be working my way through Beneath a Ruthless Sun and One Person, No Vote for the library's adult SRP prompts. I swapped out Once Upon a Wedding anthology (that first story is a slog and I am still not done with it) with Love by the Letters anthology which I should get done by the end of the week (it is only 3 stories). I might just skip to the Sonali Dev's and Pricilla Oliveras' stories in the Wedding anthology and call it good - those were the reasons for picking up the anthology in the first place. And then whatever the BL game goddesses decide for me to read. 

 

Happy Juneteenth! Happy Father's Day! Happy Reading!

 

 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2020-06-16 14:00
Tuesday Post: Library Love
Beneath a Ruthless Sun - Gilbert King
The Prince and the Dressmaker - Jen Wang
One Person, No Vote: How Voter Suppression Is Destroying Our Democracy - Carol Anderson Ph.D.,Dick Durbin
The Ghost Map: The Story of London's Most Terrifying Epidemic--and How It Changed Science, Cities, and the Modern World - Steven Johnson

My local library has re-opened for business. The Summer Reading Program (SRP) is still virtual; story time is on FB Live once a week and then you can grab a craft to do at home at the library's lobby. You log your reading and activities via Beanstack.org. There is also a story walk around the playground across the side street from the library; the story is changed out weekly. Computer Lab is still closed as well as the rooms to rent and the bathrooms. 

 

Honestly, I am glad the library is re-opened but I am taking precautions (the kids and I wearing masks, using the self-checkout kiosk rather than the front desk, 6ft distancing, etc). Our OverDrive is starting to be a PITA because everyone was borrowing so many books that I wanted that the wait times for some books was 6 weeks or more. And those books I need for the adult version of SRP - it's not how much (in minutes) reading you do, it is reading for the prompts given. And the SRP ends July 31st.

 

I picked up two books for two prompts: for true crime, Beneath A Ruthless Sun: A True Story of Violence, Race, and Justice Lost and Found by Gilbert King; for the graphic novel prompt, The Dressmaker by Jen Wang. I picked up One Person, No Vote: How Voter Suppression is Destroying Our Democracy by Carol Anderson from the #BLM and Social Justice lists going around. Finally, just because I am a weirdo, another disease book - The Ghost Map: The Story of London's Most Terrifying Epidemic - and How it Changed Science, Cities, and the Modern World by Steve Johnson.

Like Reblog Comment
text 2020-06-15 21:01
Dispatches from the Edge: A Memoir of War, Disasters, and Survival - Anderson Cooper

This book is what got me I retested one news writing. Whenever anyone mentions to me that they would like to write news, I tell them to read this book. It gave me a whole new respect for Cooper and his journey to where he is now. 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2020-05-18 03:21
A Sprig of Sea Lavender
A Sprig of Sea Lavender - J.R.L. Anderson

I bought this a few years ago, when Otto Penzler was selling his collection through his bookshop, Mysterious Books.  It's a review copy of an author I'd never heard of, but the short catalog blurb made it sound interesting: mysterious death on a train, unknown works by Gainsborough, Turner and Constable found with the body, along with a  sprig of - you guessed it - sea lavender. 

 

This is a mid-century mystery, and it suffered from the usual quirks of that age:  instant, yet chaste, romance, and a complete disregard of the fair-play rules of mystery plotting.  As such, the reader, by the end, is presented with a fait accompli in both the romance and the mystery's resolution, without having any idea whatsoever how the main character got there, although he does explain it all at the very end.  

 

By today's standards, it's all a bit thin, naive and 2 dimensional, but I had fun with it nevertheless.  It wasn't trying to be anything other than an entertaining mystery and, while I've read others that are greater successes, it generally achieved its goal.  

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?