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review 2018-08-13 05:07
we are never meeting in real life
We are Never Meeting in Real Life. - Samantha Irby

Samantha Irby has a lot to say about so many things. She writes, and sometimes rants, about a wide range of subjects in this collection — race, sexuality, poverty and cats — with an overwhelming sense of calm and rationality. With her razor-sharp wit, the moving, rip-your-heart out moments comfortably balanced the laugh-out-loud ones (I don't watch the Bachelorette, but I would if she sent her application in). Having no previous knowledge of Irby, I found myself checking out her blog and you tube videos for more. Despite being named Chicago's funniest writer when her first book, Meaty, came out, Irby continued to working as a receptionist at the local animal hospital; though to be fair, this experience provides perfect fodder for her writing. I admit, there were some extremely graphic scenes I could have done without, but the excessive swearing was expected (her blog, after all, is "bitches gotta eat"). If any of that offends you, consider yourself warned. In the meantime, I'll be checking out her other books.

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review 2018-08-12 15:51
Heroines of Mercy Street: The Real Nurses of the Civil War - Pamela D. Toler PhD

If you have never seen Mercy Street, which aired on PBS, what is wrong with you? 

If you have, read this book. In an very readable book, Dr. Toler has presented the true facts behind the Mercy Street series. Of course, the series was far different, but the real life stories are just as interesting.

Toler does not just look at the hospitals in Washington DC, but other area as well. The only flaw, if flaw it is, is a somewhat brief look at the Confederate nurses, but considering the difference in strucutre and source issues, this isn't that surprising.

Toler's book makes the point that we should know more than the simple history - the ones that are taught in text books - because the nurses during the Civil War are women who should be remembered far more widely.

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text 2018-08-08 12:25
Montgomery County Home Experts Offers Tips to First-Time Home Buyers

 

The CEO of CoesterVMS talks about what to look out for when buying a home.

 

GAITHERSBURG, Md. - Local home experts are talking to first-time homebuyers about why it might be a good time to buy a home here in our area.

Appraisal management service, CoesterVMS, talks about the market in Montgomery County.

 

The CEO of the company, Brian Coester, says after studying the local market for 10 years, data shows the average time for a house on the market is now 20 days, in comparison to previous years, when houses were listed for an average of two months.

 

As the median price in the county is going up, Coester talks about what new buyers should look for. Coester stated, “A very affordable price. Should move relatively quickly. Should be pre-approved, and it’s kind of their time to buy, if interested.”

 

Data shows the median price for homes in Montgomery County is a little over 400 thousand dollars.

 

Source: www.localdvm.com/news/i-270/montgomery-county-home-experts-offers-tips-to-first-time-home-buyers/1337775586
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review 2018-08-04 04:28
Joseph Bates: The Real Founder of Seventh-day Adventism
Joseph Bates: The Real Founder of Seventh-Day Adventism - George R. Knight

While those who would eventually form the Seventh-day Adventist Church were Millerites, only one was influential in both that his work after the Great Disappointment would standout and provide the underpinnings of the eventual largest Adventist denomination.  Joseph Bates: The Real Founder of Seventh-day Adventism by George R. Knight is a comprehensive look at one of the most important men in the Adventism movement before and after October 1844.

 

Beginning with a young boy looking for adventure as a sailor, Knight fully covers the life of Joseph Bates until his death as a senior statesman of the Church he helped to found still looking to serve Christ.  In covering Bates career at sea, Knight pulls out traits—both potentially benefital and harmful—that would serve him as he preached the soon coming of Christ as part of the Millerite movement and later his development of Sabbatarian Adventism.  After retiring, Bates who had already shown a keen interest in reform, firstly himself and then his own ship’s crew, launched himself into numerous reform movements until he heard Advent message of William Miller and seeing it as the ultimate reform movement wholeheartedly went to spread the good news.  Though not a primary leader, he was a major secondary leader within the Millerites that both chaired conferences and went out preaching.  After the Great Disappointment of October 1844, Bates began studying and joined those Adventists that believed something did occur though not the fanatics that tainted this group of post-Disappointment Millerites.  It is at this point in which Knight carefully covers Bates life over a decade, though focused on a four year span in particular, in which Bates became both the first theologian and then first historian of Sabbatarian Adventism and would lay the foundations of essentially all major doctrines that set the Seventh-day Adventist Church apart from other denominations.  Knight covers Bates relationship with both James and Ellen White in full during this period and after as the trio would guide the “little flock” over the next two decades until his death.

 

In approximately 220 pages of text and reference, Knight use Bates’ own autobiography as well as research first discovered others including two of his own students to give the reader a full sense of the life of Joseph Bate as can be expected.  Though the book is not strictly chronological, Knight structures the book in such a way as to give an overview in a certain period of Bates life in one chapter and in the subsequent one focus on a particular aspect during that period with it most typically being theological in nature.  This keeps the book engaging for the general reader and not getting them bogged down or overwhelmed with detail of having a strictly chronological book from beginning to end.  Yet while these choices by Knight create a very good and readable book, there just seemed to be something off with his writing that made me feel that it was up to other books that he had authored.

 

Joseph Bates: The Real Founder of Seventh-day Adventism is a very good book for those, whether Seventh-day Adventists or not, looking to understand the history of denomination that Bates helped to found.  As the preeminent Seventh-day Adventist historian, George R. Knight presents the Bates the man of both virtues and flaws and how he shaped the Advent movement.  I highly recommend this book for those interested in SDA Church history.

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text 2018-08-02 09:04
5 Things to Know Before You Invest In a Buy-To-Let Property

 

 

If you find that interest rates are low enough, you may feel tempted to invest your money in a buy-to-let property. This is a common enough practice for many people, who wish to earn a little extra from tenants.

 

Buying a property to let is a fantastic option, according to many real estate agents. As a matter of fact, many of them help clients with exactly the task of finding the right property to let. There are a few things to consider in regards to such investments

  • Who is the target tenant – this is perhaps the most important decision you have to make. It is also the one that will significantly influence the buying process. Who will the property be rented to and how much money do you expect to make of this? You need to research the chosen area and what people usually search properties there. In doing so, you will find out whether you want to target students, families, retirees or professionals. The type of tenant will largely determine how much you can charge for the place.
  • General area – the area you buy the property in is also an important factor to consider. It will largely determine your yield and return, which is essential for every investment. Location matters a lot. People are always more interested in neighbourhoods with more amenities, good public transport options or just general proximity to important areas in the city. Of course, other things could also attract tenants: nightlife, sports clubs, school and university campus, etc. Put yourself in the shoes of your desired tenant and consider what they want the most.
  • Work out what you can afford – if you want to be a landlord, you need to know what you can afford. Being a homeowner yourself is a good start to be accepted for a buy-to-let mortgage. You need to keep in mind all of the budgetary requirements since a buy-to-let property is pretty much like buying your own private home. There may be unexpected costs that you also need to plan for.
  • Mind your legal responsibilities – as a landlord, you will have some responsibilities. After all, renting is much like running your own business. There are tax purposes and additional legalities, such as safety certificates, landlord license and energy performance certificates to name a few. Complying with these regulations is the only way to avoid big fines so ensure you are prepared.
  • Should things go wrong – it is not possible to plan for everything, but you should do your best. Many things could go south, such as bad tenants and empty properties. Having the right safety processes in place will help you deal with them much. You need to prepare with some knowledge of eviction notices, tenancy agreements, legal matters and more. Make sure you pay attention to tenant referencing to have peace of mind about your tenants.

Now that you know what it takes to find a buy-to-let property and to become a landlord, all you have to do is find the right property for this purpose

 

At Open Estate we can help you with that. Just contact us on 01923 537 111 with your query.

 

©  Open Estates

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