logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Resurrection-Day
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-03-15 00:46
Eh...
Phoenix Resurrection: The Return Of Jean Grey (2017-2018) #1 (of 5) - Leinil Francis Yu,Matt Rosenberg

So, the thing is that people keep trying to redo the Phoenix story, and it's always less impressive to me than the original.   I also don't like Jean Grey much, but I wanted to see if this was any good, and I got it free via the Marvel Insider program.  

 

I'm holding off on more, because I'm not sure I'll like any of the other comics, but I'm also considering the Hulk one.   I will not be finishing up with this series, however. 

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-03-06 04:07
A Brilliant Novel about Second and (almost?) Last Chances
Resurrection Men: An Inspector Rebus Novel (Inspector Rebus Novels) - Ian Rankin

Another ghost in need of justice. Rebus had confessed to her once, after too many late-night drinks in the Oxford Bar, that he saw ghosts. Or didn’t see them so much as sense them. All the cases, the innocent -- and not so innocent -- victims . . . all those lives turned into CID files . . . They were always more than that to him. He’d seemed to see it as a failing, but Siobhan hadn’t agreed.

 

<i>We wouldn’t be human if they didn’t get to us</i>, she’d told him. His look had stilled her with its cynicism, as if he were saying that “human” was the one thing they weren’t supposed to be.


Thanks to sickness, a little bit of travel, and general increased busy-ness in my non-blog life, I almost missed my monthly check-in with John Rebus. Thankfully, for my Bookish-OCD, I made it just in time. Even better? This was one of the best in the series.

 

Rebus' drinking and displeasure at Gill Templar's handling of a murder investigation results in him being sent back to school. Literally. There's a "retraining" course at the Police College for long-serving officers with discipline problems -- sort of a last chance before the end of the road. These detectives are pretty similar, they've (mostly) been at this for years and aren't going to change, no matter what happens in the course. Most of them know each other by reputation, Rebus is well-known, apparently -- and he knows another classmate by reputation, he's "the Glasgow Rebus." After some counseling sessions, and some class lectures, the detectives are given a cold case to work to help learn something about teamwork. A couple of the detectives were associated with the original investigation in Glasgow, and even Rebus brushed up against it in Edinburgh. It's not so clear how much teamwork is being learned, it's clear that there are people who know things about the case that aren't in the files -- and they're not sharing.

 

There is something about the case that could involve Big Ger, so guess who gets volunteered to talk to him? Rebus is not the only one talking to Cafferty, Siobhan Clarke (now a DS) has a couple of conversations with him. Watching Cafferty try to treat the two of the similarly, with different results, was quite entertaining -- Clarke reacts to him differently than Rebus, but she doesn't take the same angle with him that I think most would. I look forward to seeing the two of them lock horns in the future.

 

Speaking of Siobhan -- never call her Shiv, by the way -- once again, she threatened to take over the book for the first half or so. Rebus' drinking with the other problem police and their cold case just didn't grab my attention at first. But Siobhan's dealing with the investigation -- without her mentor to bounce ideas off of -- and the various and sundry male detectives around her. Some of which work with her just fine, others . . . not so much -- at the end of the day, DS Clarke is the one who puts the case together, and in a pretty compelling way. Did I enjoy things a little bit more when Rebus came along to interact with a bit? Yeah, but it wasn't necessary. I also like the way that Rebus and Templar were the ones (along with Siobhan herself) noticing her doing things like Rebus this time, not just other police. He's clearly left his stamp on her -- for good or ill, the trick is watching her approach things the way he would, but remaining her own person. Which she has so far -- and, I bet, will continue to do so.

 

But this is a Rebus novel, at the end of the day, and he does get the better material -- as I mentioned, he interacts with Siobhan some because he and the others come to Edinburgh to follow a pretty shaky lead (mostly, it's an excuse to get away from the college and drink somewhere else). Around this point, that storyline became more intriguing -- and it did end up being the better part of the novel.

 

No one will ever say that the Rebus novels are a fun romp, but there was something about Rankin's writing in <b>Resurrection Men</b> that seemed darker than usual -- not a darkness because of violence or anything, just in the telling. Everything seemed worse, everything seemed sinister -- it's hard to put my finger on it exactly, but there was something grim going on. Yeah, I laughed a couple of times, smiled more often than that, but overall, the noir in this book was blacker. We see areas of Rebus' psyche we haven't seen much of before -- ditto for Clarke -- we also get some good Rebus/Cafferty backstory.

 

The structure of this novel is the real star -- it was just perfect -- we get a couple of mysteries to watch our detectives solve, plus a couple of other things go on. It even seems like Rankin doles out the information in an unusual way, only telling us what we need to know when we need to know it -- there are times when we're more in the dark than Rebus because he's hiding the information from his fellow Last-Chancers and us (what does that say about Rankin's readers?), but it works -- this isn't a case of a mystery writer cheating, it's a deliberate attempt to build suspense. Complex without being complicated, brilliantly plotted but not in a way that feels totally organic. At a certain point, the way that all the storylines end up seem inevitable (even when you're still not sure who the various killers are going to be), yet you're surprised when the inevitable happens. But along the way, each step in the stories, each reveal, each development catches you off guard. Just fantastic structure to the book.

 

I thought it was strange that Rankin started this one off (I'm guessing for the American edition only) with a little description of the Scottish Police's organization and rankings, which was nice (but most readers can figure it out on their own). Also included was a list of the cast of characters -- organized by storyline. That was helpful, too. Unnecessary, but very nice. I'm not sure why these were used, but I'll take them.

 

This one checked almost every one of my boxes -- at least once, and never didn't hold my interest. Rankin clearly knows what he's doing and you should read this one -- and the twelve before it.


<a href="http://angelsguiltypleasures.com/2018-library-love-challenge-review-link-ups/" target="_blank"><img class="aligncenter" style="border:none;height:auto;width:300px;" src="http://angelsguiltypleasures.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/2018LibraryLoveChallenge07-400x400-angelsgp.jpg" alt="2018 Library Love Challenge" /></a>

Source: irresponsiblereader.com/2018/03/05/resurrection-men-by-ian-rankin
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2017-10-03 01:11
Half-Resurrection Blues by Daniel Jose Older
Half-Resurrection Blues - Daniel José Older

I read this one for Diverse Voices. It would also work for Supernatural, Ghost & The Dead Will Walk (there's a necromancer reanimating corpses).

 

I went back and forth on this book, but ultimately settled on 3 stars. I enjoyed the urban feel to this piece of urban fantasy and the Brooklyn setting was well-done. The narration is told from the (first person) perspective of Carlos Delacruz, whose internal dialogue switches between profanity-laced grit and self-deprecating humor. 

 

One of the weaknesses of the book was the weird, almost stalkerish, relationship between Carlos and the love interest Sasha. Carlos sees a picture of Sasha and is immediately "drawn" to her. There are major issues with this entire aspect of the plot, at least for me, starting with this attraction based on Sasha's terminal hotness, and ending with the resolution to their "relationship" at the end of the book. The whole thing made me uncomfortable. It was a huge part of the book, as well, so I can't just ignore it.

 

And, I'm not going to lie, nearly the entire ending of this book is confusing. I'm still trying to sort it out in my mind.  In addition, when I think about the UF series that I've really enjoyed, it's clear to me that I prefer my UF to revolve around women, such as Kate Daniels, Mercy Thompson, and Verity Price. So, I haven't decided if I will go on with this series or not, and now I've talked myself into knocking off another 1/2 star.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2017-09-30 17:11
Reading progress update: I've read 23%.
Half-Resurrection Blues - Daniel José Older

I am reading this for the Diverse Voices bingo square. The main character, Carlos Delacruz, is an "Inbetweener" who has been partially resurrected from a death - and life - that he remembers basically nothing about. It's set in Brooklyn, NY, which made me realize that New York is a setting that I don't see often in Urban Fantasy. That may well be a result of my reading choices, but now that I think about it, that's weird, right? I read series set in London, Atlanta, Chicago, California, but I can't think of anything else set in NYC.

 

I mean what could be a better setting for UF than NYC, with its rich and incredibly diverse population?

 

So far, the writing is breezy and engaging.

Like Reblog Comment
review 2017-08-30 00:00
The Resurrection of Joan Ashby: A Novel
The Resurrection of Joan Ashby: A Novel ... The Resurrection of Joan Ashby: A Novel - Cherise Wolas UPDATED REVIEW 9/26/17:
This is a brilliantly written (debut!) literary novel at 500+ pages that reads both like an intimate memoir and a sweeping epic. The language dazzles as we become infatuated with, invested in, and infuriated with Joan Ashby: The Writer. Her craft is the single most important thing to her, and her ambition never wanes as she begrudgingly accepts motherhood. Reading her stories and knowing her sacrifices makes an eventual betrayal that much more painful. I’m halfway convinced that Joan Ashby is the real writer here, and Cherise Wolas is her literary agent. Wolas has an immense talent for storytelling and I will gladly read anything else she writes.


ORIGINAL REVIEW 8/29/17:
I received an eGalley from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

I almost didn't read this book. The description and the cover art definitely grabbed my eye, and I have a weakness for all protagonists named Joan, but I don't read "women's fiction" or much "contemporary family life" at all. Give me gritty realism and raw facts; even my taste in poetry tends to hit hard. I didn't want to read about another woman coming to realize that motherhood was a blessing in disguise, despite her sacrifices along the way.

I could not be more happy to be entirely wrong about this novel.

I am besotted with the way Wolas writes. I would read and reread entire paragraphs, languishing in their beauty before I was ready to move onward to the next delicious sentence. I, too, have fallen under Ashby's spell and would be delighted if any of HER writing were published today. I would read anything Ashby wrote, and the same now goes for Cherise Wolas, even if I have to wait 28 years in the meantime. I know it will be worth it.
More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?