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text 2018-05-31 10:15
REVIEW BY HELEN - Returning to The Edge (The Edge #3) by Aliyah Burke
Returning to The Edge (The Edge #3) - Aliyah Burke

Patience truly is a virtue.

 

As the baby of the family, veterinarian Mary Meyers is used to being overlooked and overshadowed. Back home, she indulges in a one-night stand with her eldest brother’s friend. He’s more than she thought he would be, but she isn’t sure she’s ready for another commitment.

 

Ron Glennon falls hard and fast for the youngest Meyers child. He wants more than just a clandestine relationship with her but she’s hesitant. He backs off and lets her have her way even though it’s killing him inside. Finally, the time comes for her to choose. Will he get to keep her after she’s returned to The Edge?

 

Source: archaeolibrarian.wixsite.com/website/single-post/2018/05/15/Returning-to-The-Edge-The-Edge-3-by-Aliyah-Burke
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review 2018-05-10 14:56
A truly romantic novel about a love that survives against all odds.
Returning to the Land of the Morning Calm - Hans M. Hirschi

I can reassure those who know Mr. Hirschi as the Queen of Unconventional Happy Endings. He’s done it again.

This book, perhaps the most romantic of the books I’ve read so far by this author, in my opinion, is about a love story that has survived incredible odds and lasted almost a whole lifetime. Despite being separated by different continents, being from different backgrounds, and hardly knowing each other’s languages and customs, two young men meet in Korea shortly after the war (in 1953) and feel attracted to each other. One, Martin, is an African-American soldier with a penchant for languages, helping the UN with the pacification tasks. The other, Ji-Hoon, is a young man working at the family restaurant, whose future path has been decided for him. He will get married and inherit the family business. They are both young, beautiful, and inexperienced. In such strange circumstances, they meet and get to know each other. Martin helps Ji-Hoon’s family providing supplies as often as he can, and he ends up becoming a friend of the whole family. But, they are not meant to be together. Martin goes back to the US and never meets anybody he feels the same about as he did for Ji-Hoon. He knows he was going to get married, but after a brief epistolary contact, they lose touch. Now in his eighties, thanks to a new nurse at the nursing home where he is staying, Kevin, and to the brother of one of the other residents, Eugene, he is encouraged to find out what happened to the true love of his life.

The story, although written in the third person, is told from Martin’s point of view. There are chapters set in the present, interspersed with chapters that took place in Korea after the war, providing the readers the background to understand both, the love story, and also how time has passed and changed things. There is a fair amount of telling in the book, as Martin, who is, in many ways, old-fashioned, not used to talking about his feelings, and of a generation where being openly gay was not the done thing (and in his case, being compounded by the race issue it would have made his life even harder), lives pretty much a quiet life, full of memories of the one event and emotion that really shook his world. Martin is confronted by some openly gay men (very different in outlook: Kevin, a Goth nurse who has trouble fitting in, but not with his sexuality; Eugene, who found a refuge for his more flamboyant mannerisms in an acting career; and Eugene’s nephew, who is married to another man and has children and a blissful family life, other than the conflict with his mother) and their questions and different outlooks make him, in a way, come of age and wonder, not only how things could have been, but also, why things could be. The fact that men still find him attractive, and there is still plenty of life left in him, together with the encouragement he receives, makes him go back to Korea pursuing the love of his youth.

The beautifully detailed writing manages to bring Korea to life, both in the post-war era and now. We share in Martin’s point of view and that makes us see the beauty of it, the wonder, but also the confusion and how much it has changed when we get to the present. The descriptions of places, food, and moments are emotional and beautiful. Korea and the way it has changed over time parallels what has happened to Martin. There are traces of the past, love for respect and tradition, but some of the old things had to be removed to make way for the new, and some could not be saved. It is not all for the better, but there is still beauty there, and its people are still the people Martin felt so fond of.

In some ways, we know little about Martin, who is not somebody who talks about him easily, and who only makes passing comments about his previous life and shares some brief snippets about his parents, his work, and his lovers over the years, but does not dwell on them. He is a modest and humble man who seems unaware of how much people like him or how fond they are of him. He is a credible character, and his doubts and hesitations fit in well with his age, his outlook on life, and also the effect he has on others. At the same time, his exploration of life and his perfect role as an observer when he first goes to Korea and on his return help readers explore and feel at one with him, sharing in his wonder and confusion.

Apart from Korea and the love story at the heart of the book, there are many other themes that come into play and create a complex background. The three men who end up going to Korea face some challenges and prejudice. While Martin could hide his sexual orientation, his skin colour was there for everybody to see, and being in the military he was fully aware of how different a treatment he was likely to receive from his colleagues. Eugene could not hide his gayness and pass for straight, and his lifestyle put him at risk. We know the #MeToo does not only apply to women, and in Eugene’s case, it had serious consequences for him. He was shunned by his sister all of his life, for being who he was. And his nephew suffered the same fate. Kevin, whose looks and style-choices have made him a bit of an outsider, is a loner and feels more comfortable with Martin than with people his age. There are parallels and similarities between the —at least at first sight— very different characters, and later on, we see these parallels are also in evidence across the world, with religious beliefs and conservative traditions coming in the way of love and understanding. We see Ji-Hoon only through Martin’s eyes at first, and he is not always insightful about people around him or about how he is perceived by others, but we have an opportunity to see what impact he truly had on his friends later on in the book.

Although the story of elderly men or women trying to find a lost love is not new, I enjoyed Martin’s process of discovery and his coming into his own. I love the comradery and the way the three men helped each other, with Eugene playing the fairy godmother and facilitating the trip, Kevin providing the technical and hands-on know-how, and Martin confronting his fears to become the hero he was meant to be. This is a novel about friendship, about history, about love, and about hope. We should never lose our hope and dreams. Nothing is impossible if we don’t give up. (Ah, there is no erotica, in case that you, like me, don’t particularly enjoy it).

The author includes a recipe at the end (the dish is central to the story, so I won’t go into detail), and he also explains some of the process and the language difficulties he faced and adds a glossary of terms at the end.

A gorgeous cover, for a truly romantic book that goes beyond the standard love story and includes an ensemble of characters you’ll feel sorry to say goodbye to. I’ll be eagerly waiting for Mr. Hirschi’s next book.

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review 2018-04-20 20:54
Meh
Returning for Valentine's - Victoria Pinder,Greta Buckle

Returning For Valentine's by Victoria Pinder is a quick read, perfect for those with limited reading time.  This is my first book by Victoria Pinder and frankly, I'm a little disappointed.  Beth and Nathan's story is full of drama, angst, spice and a bit of humor.  It is choppy and disjointed though, not the smooth read I expected.  I will reserve judgment though on Ms. Pinder's writing abilities and try one of her longer books.  I've heard from authors that it's hard to write a book this short.  

 

I voluntarily read a complimentary copy of this book that I received from Bookfunnel.  All thoughts and opinions are my own.

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review 2017-08-01 00:00
Returning: Episode I
Returning: Episode I - A.L. Knorr Mira is a mermaid, a siren, and it's time to come home, out of the water, and find a mate. Instinct is her guide, and her and her mother prepared for this eventuality. But being a mermaid out of water isn't as easy as she anticipated, especially when her new friend and finding her "One" collide. Now she'll need to fine tune her humanity to figure a way out of this mess, and keep her identity a secret, a task harder than she first thought.

This novella mermaid romance is fun dive into the world the author has created. I read this book after reading [b:Born of Water|33223763|Born of Water (Elemental Origins, #1)|A.L. Knorr|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1480641629s/33223763.jpg|53928928], and it's neat to see how that character's mother found her mate. It also features another supernatural character, which I anticipate I'll learn more about in [b:Born of Fire|33825190|Born of Fire (Elemental Origins, #2)|A.L. Knorr|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1483978184s/33825190.jpg|54488261].

So much fun to be had, you might as well snap this book up and get a taste of [a:A.L. Knorr's|16144117|A.L. Knorr|https://images.gr-assets.com/authors/1483967737p2/16144117.jpg] incredible writing.

And if you like young adult mermaid books, here's a whole bunch that you may enjoy: http://www.angeleya.com/mermaid-books-for-teens/
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review 2017-05-01 08:00
Returning
Returning: Episode I - A.L. Knorr

Mira is a mermaid on a mission. Having said goodbye to the ocean she's looking to procreate with her still-to-be-found mate.

This was a quick and easy read. The story is enough to keep you entertained for the give-or-take hour it took me to complete it. However, there is a lot of convenience in there. Being a mermaid has installed Mira  with a lot of 'feeling' things. So she will immediately know when she first sees her mate that it's him (talk about some instalove). Also, her set of powers comes in extremely handy. Some things also seemed a bit strange, as for example when Mira is talking about supernaturals.

While it didn't bother me too much in this novella, I'm not sure I would like to read a complete novel that's this convenient.

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