logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: Science
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
review 2018-01-16 18:24
A Wrinkle in Time
A Wrinkle in Time (Time, #1) - Madeleine L'Engle

I read this book a long time ago, probably in 5th or 6th grade, but I felt like I needed a refresher before the movie is released later this year.

 

All in all, I really enjoyed it. It is obviously written for kids so it was a very quick read and easy to get through. Some of the science of it is more complex than I remembered though, so it's definitely still a good read for adults. 

 

It is definitely a book of the 60s. The language and phrases used were things that would never be said today, but I think that's part of the charm of this little book. I adore the characters, especially the Mrs W's and Aunt Beast. 

 

I'm definitely glad that I reread this. Now I can't wait for the movie version, and I can't wait to see what Ava Duvernay and the cast do with it!

Like Reblog Comment
review 2018-01-16 18:11
Annihilation
Annihilation - Jeff VanderMeer

I first picked up this book last year, after I saw the trailer for the movie. I was very intrigued. The movie looked really great. 

 

But when I first picked it up, I could not get into it. I got about 40 pages in and gave up. But I decided to give it another chance this week, since the movie comes out next month and I wanted to know what to expect going in.

 

But the truth is, even after reading the book, I’m still not sure what to expect. I feel like so much of the book is left to the readers’ imagination that I don’t know how it’s going to translate to film. But that’s not important.

 

I really overall enjoyed Annihilation. Slow at first, but after about the first third of the book, I got really interested in it. But I wish it would’ve given more answers. So much was left open-ended. Too much, in my opinion. I really don’t know much more about Area X than I did when I began reading the book. Maybe that was purposeful. Sure, I know the biologist’s thoughts and theories about what she saw, but that gives the reader no solid truths about Area X and what’s really happening there. (I do NOT understand the Crawler at all and was very confused about the descriptions of it and what it was doing, even though I feel like those were very important to the story.)

 

Maybe the other two books in the series continue to explain things better, so I guess I’ll have to read those to really grasp what went down in this book.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-01-15 23:46
Driven (Northern Waste, #1) by Eve Kenin 4 Star Romance
Driven - Eve Silver,Eve Kenin

In the harsh Northern Waste where human life is worth little, ice trucker Raina Bowen has learned to keep her eyes open and her knife close at hand. She's spent her life on the run, one step ahead of the megalomaniac who hunts her. All she wants is to stay out of trouble and haul her load of grain to Gladow Station—but trouble finds her in the form of a sexy stranger called Wizard. He has the trucking pass she needs, and she has to drag him out of a brawl with the very people she's trying to hide from in order to get it. 

She may have rescued him, but Raina's not foolish enough to see Wizard as anything close to helpless. He's hard and honed and full of secrets—secrets that may destroy them both. As they race across the Waste, trying to outrun rival truckers, ice pirates, and the powerful man bent on their destruction, Raina's forced to admit that trouble's found her. And this time, there's nowhere left to run.

 

Review

This is a petal to the metal good time. Our heroine is everything and our hero has to do everything he can to keep up with her.

 

If you like Tank Girl and Mad Mx: Fury Road, you will love this.

 

A great action adventure romance with a dystopian flare.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-01-15 22:21
Doomsday Book by Connie Willis
The Doomsday Book - Connie Willis

Series: Oxford Time Travel #1

 

I'm still debating whether I should give this five stars or stick to 4.5. This was a reread for me and I still found it compelling, although I didn't blaze through it in a couple days like I did the first time around. There are, admittedly, some issues with regards to historical accuracy, like being worried about cholera in the 14th century and assuming that mediaeval people were much shorter than modern day ones...but it still works for me.

 

I liked the characters, especially the little girl Agnes, and I loved how people would basically have conversations at cross purposes because they were all in their own little bubbles with their own concerns.

 

Basically, Kivrin is a historian who time travels back to the 14th century to stay for a couple weeks and make a record of the mediaeval life she observes. Of course, her plans go awry and plot happens, and her unofficial tutor, Mr. Dunworthy, tries to get her back.

 

I really wish more books would combine the mediaeval time period and science fiction.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-01-15 18:14
Gut by Giulia Enders
Gut: The Inside Story of Our Body's Most Underrated Organ - Giulia Enders

A book about the digestive system for laypeople. It’s written in a strong voice and is both informative and accessible, explaining current research in terms understandable to the non-scientist and including helpful tips for everyday life. Enders advises readers on everything from cleanliness (wring out kitchen sponges; bacteria love them because they’re warm and damp, but drying can keep them somewhat cleaner) to diet (cold cooked rice, potato salad, asparagus, leeks, garlic and onions are all nutritious offerings for the good bacteria in our digestive system) to combating nausea (ginger has proven effects, as does the acupuncture point P6).

But I have to admit that I didn’t enjoy reading this as much as I expected based on the reviews. Maybe because this just isn’t my favorite subject, and I read it from start to finish, pushing through sections such as the one on laxatives that didn’t particularly interest me in order to reach the more interesting material, like the influence of the gut on the brain. Maybe because I’m used to books with an overarching thesis to pull it all together, where this felt more like a series of disparate topics and a lot of (often intriguing or useful) factoids than a coherent whole. Maybe because so many topics are breezed through so quickly, often in metaphorical language that can help readers picture what’s going on, but that doesn’t provide a full understanding. Still, it’s a useful book with plenty of practical application in daily life, so although it wasn’t my favorite reading experience, I am glad I read it and would recommend.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?