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review 2017-09-22 02:01
Playing With Forever (Sydney Smoke Rugby) by Amy Andrews
Playing With Forever (Sydney Smoke Rugby Series) - Amy Andrews

 

The dog is the star and the romance plays a close second in this immensely entertaining, laughably tempting, hard to put down romance.  The sports star with the sexy physique and his pick of women is brought down to size by a mischievous pooch and a slip of a woman with big dreams and a talent for dog whispering.  Playing With Forever is every woman's dream.  To find a guy that may not be perfect, but is willing to take a chance all in the name of love.

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text 2017-09-19 23:23
Classic Crime Club?
Death of an Airman - Christopher St. John Sprigg
The Red House Mystery - A.A. Milne
The Tiger in the Smoke - Margery Allingham
Resorting to Murder: Holiday Mysteries: A British Library Crime Classic (British Library Crime Classics) - Martin Edwards
Ask A Policeman - Dorothy L. Sayers,Gladys Mitchell,Detection Club,Anthony Berkeley,John Rhode,Milward Kennedy,Helen de Guerry Simpson

I'm considering starting a classic crime book club. We have a number of mystery/crime readers here on booklikes, and I'm wondering if there is enough interest to do a monthly book club?

 

Parameters:

 

One book per month, chosen by the club members;

Published between 1900 and 1960

Starting in October

 

Is anyone interested?

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text 2017-08-28 17:26
Erster Satz | Dan Vyleta: Smoke
Smoke: Roman - Katrin Segerer,Dan Vyleta

"Thomas! Thomas! Wach auf!"

 

Kaum ist er wach, sucht er Nachthemd und Bettzeug nach Ruß ab. Er macht es schnell, mechanisch, noch im Halbschlaf: fährt mit einer Hand über die Haut und tastet nach der verräterischen körnigen Substanz. 

 

Erst danach fragt er sich, wie spät es ist und wer ihn geweckt hat. 

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review 2017-07-13 20:34
Bright Smoke, Cold Fire
Bright Smoke, Cold Fire - Rosamund Hodge

[I received a copy of this book through Edelweiss.]

Hmm, not sure about this one. It’s a retelling of ‘Romeo & Juliet’, in a city that is the last one standing while the rest of the world has been invaded by ‘zombies’, where three families share the power, and where the religious order of the Sisters of Thorn has to perform yearly blood sacrifices in order to keep the undead at bay. It has a mysterious plague that makes people rise again after their death if precautions aren’t taken, and in that city, ‘the Juliet’ is actually a warrior bred from birth through magic rituals, with the ability to sense if someone has shed her family’s blood, and the compulsion to avenge said family member in turn (in other words, she still does a few other things than feigning death, thinking Romeo is dead, and promptly killing herself in turn). Also, she’s doomed to turn mad at some point

All in all, why not? This was interesting. The story itself, though, was kind of confusing, and although it did end up making sense, there were quite a few things I would’ve seen developed more in depth. Such as the Night Games, or the Necromancer (who kind of turned up at the awkward moment), or the Romeo/Paris/Vai trio relationship.

I’m not sure about the characters. I sort of liked the Juliet? Because she had that idea that ‘I’m already dead, and Romeo is dead, so I don’t care about dying because it means I can see him again’, yet at the same time she was quite lively and determined and not actively trying to take her own life while moping; her story is also rather sad (stripped of her name/real identity in a family whose beliefs in the afterlife involve having a name in order to be saved... nice). Romeo, though, was kind of stupid, and Paris way too naive; of the power trio there, the one I definitely liked was Vai (with a twist that was a bit predictable, but eh, he was fun to read about, and I totally agreed with the way he envisioned problems and how to tackle them!). As for Runajo... I don’t know. Determined, too, yet there were several moments when I thought her decisions should have her get killed or cast out or something, and she wasn’t because Plot Device.

(And very, very minor thing that probably only peeved me because I’m French, but... ‘Catresou’ sounds just so damn weird. I kept reading and ‘hearing’ that name as a French name, which sounds exactly like ‘quatre sous’—that’s like ‘four pence’—aaaand... Yep, so bizarre.)

Conclusion: 2.5 stars. To be fair, I liked the world depicted here in general, and that this retelling is sufficiently removed from R & J as to stand by itself; however, it was probably too ambitious for one volume, and ended up confusing.

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review 2017-07-02 19:12
An Intimate Look at the Tuscarora Tribe during the American Revolution
The Smoke: Tales From a Revolution - New-York - Lars D. H. Hedbor

At first, I thought I was reading the parallel stories of two leaders in two different cultures during the American Revolution, Tanarou, a Tuscarora elder and Sgt. Howe of the Colonial New York militia, since the first two chapters open in these men’s points of view. The plot at first appeared to be about the progress of the war and the conflicts among the Iroquois confederacy, the Colonials, and the British. Then it became the stories of two younger warriors, Ginawo, a promising leader in his tribe, and Private Joseph Killeen, and the unwelcome alliances Native tribes were obliged to make when caught between two sides. Finally, it evolved into Joseph’s story, with the broad view of the war narrowing down to focus an intense light on one young man and his cross between two cultures. Though the dialogue is sometimes forced and in one instance becomes a clunky “I did my research” display as one character unrealistically tells another things she already knows, the writing otherwise flows well and the relationships are portrayed with affecting depth. I would have liked the book to be longer, a fully fleshed out novel. There was potential in it for a big story. However, it was still worth reading, and once it found its focus on the protagonist and I realized what the arc of the plot was about, I was totally immersed in it. My interests in Native American history and eighteenth century history led me to this book, and Hedbor didn’t disappoint me at all in the depth and quality of his understanding of the cultures and setting. Since I’ve already acquired another book in the series, which explores the Revolutionary War in various locales, I’ll probably read it, but I don’t think I’ll get hooked on the series as a whole. History buffs who like short books, however—it was only 167 pages on my Nook—may well become whole-series fans.

 

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