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Search tags: Stephen-Gammell
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review 2017-09-05 09:41
Scary Stories To Tell In The Dark Books by Alvin Schwartz, Stephen Gammell (Artwork), Brett Helquist (Updated Artwork)

I love these stories. I much prefer the original artwork by Stephen Gammell. It is nostalgic, plus I feel like the artwork and stories belong together. The stories are not the same without the original art. That being said, there is nothing wrong with the updated art by Brett Helquist; it isn't bad, just I have no idea why they would even change the art in the first place.

 

If I were to run across Brett Helquist's artwork somewhere else and they were not tied to this books and my childhood nostalgia, I would really like them quite a lot. I am interested in his work and would read other books he does the artwork for. In fact, I love the art in A Series of Unfortunate Events.

 

Original Covers & Art

 

 

Updated Covers & Art

 

Comparison of their art style: Stephen verses Brett

As you can see, both are very good, but people who grew up with the original might agree with me in saying Stephen's is much more frightening and belongs with the text.

 

 

 

 

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review 2016-11-28 22:47
Scary Stories 3: More Tales to Chill Your Bones by Alvin Schwartz
Scary Stories 3: More Tales to Chill Your Bones - Alvin Schwartz,Stephen Gammell
 Genre: Horror / Short Story / Monsters


Year Published: 1991


Year Read: 2016


Series: Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark #3
 
 

Publisher: HarperCollins  

 

Scary



YES! YES! YES!

Finally, I got the chance to read the final set of stories from Alvin Schwartz and Stephen Gammell’s controversial yet popular series, “Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark” called “Scary Stories 3: More Tales to Chill Your Bones!” In celebration of Halloween, I have decided to revisit this little gem of a series again and I was seriously not disappointed!

This book mostly has a set of scary stories that will haunt you in your sleep, so here are a couple of stories out of this collection:

Harold


The story starts off with two guys named Thomas and Alfred who decided to make a man sized doll that looked exactly like the farmer they hated named Harold and they decided to put the doll outside the pasture to scare off the birds. Occasionally, Thomas and Alfred would make fun of the Harold doll and sometimes violently hit the doll for no reason at all. One night however, Thomas and Alfred start to notice strange things about the Harold doll as the doll began to make grunting noises and started moving around by itself. This starts to creep out both Alfred and Thomas and they decided to leave the pasture to get away from Harold. But when Thomas decided to go back to the pasture to get the milking stools…

The Red Spot

Scary

One night when Ruth was sleeping, she noticed a spider crawling on her face and afterwards, she discovered that she had a big red spot on her left cheek. She showed the red spot to her mother and her mother kept telling her that the red spot will go away soon enough. But later on, the red spot got bigger and bigger and soon it began to burst and….

Is Something Wrong?

Scary

The story started off with a man spending the night at an empty house due to his car breaking down. As soon as the man tried to go to sleep, he heard a loud crash and something large and heavy fell through the chimney and went after the man. The man then started running away from the strange creature, but when he came to the road, the creature tapped him on the shoulder and…

Just like the previous two books in the “Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark” series, Alvin Schwartz has done an excellent job at narrating these spooky tales that range from being deeply disturbing (“Harold” and “Just Delicious”) to being slightly scary but having a somewhat humorous twist towards the end (“Is Something Wrong)? I like the fact that Alvin Schwartz is able to juggle between horror and humor in this collection as it made the stories interesting to read through (even though I have always preferred the more straight-forward horror themed stories since I love reading genuinely terrifying tales, especially in October)! But, probably the best part about this book was the illustrations done by none other than Stephen Gammell! Now, while I understand that Stephen Gammell’s artwork was highly controversial when this series first came out, I honestly love how horrifying these illustrations are as they make the horror aspects in each of the stories even more effective to read through and I was seriously creeped out by some of the illustrations! Some of my favorite images in this book were from “Is Something Wrong?” “The Dead Hand,” “Sam’s New Pet,” and “The Red Spot!”

The reason why I took off half a star from the rating was because the pacing in some of the stories were a bit too slow, especially in the story “The Trouble,” where I wished that the story would have gotten to the main point much quicker. Also, the reason why this book series was so controversial was due to Stephen Gammell’s frightening artwork. There are some genuinely horrifying artworks in this book, most notably in stories like “Sam’s New Pet,” “The Dead Hand” and “Is Something Wrong?” and some of the artwork would feature grotesque and creepy characters and characters that are covered in blood. Parents might want to read this book first before showing it to their children to see if their children can handle the scary content of this book series.

Overall, “Scary Stories 3: More Tales to Chill Your Bones” is a truly great finale to Alvin Schwartz and Stephen Gammell’s legendary “Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark” series and even though this series has come to an end, I will probably still re read this series down the line once more! I would recommend this book to children ages six and up since the frightening imagery and scary stories might terrify younger children.

Review is also on: Rabbit Ears Book Blog

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text 2016-01-31 00:41
Poems/ Sentence Fluency
Old Black Fly - Jim Aylesworth,Stephen Gammell

This super cute book is about a fly that goes on an alphabetic rampage until he is finally stopped by a fly swatter. This book has great rhythm and flow so it is a popular read aloud book. After reading, the children can come up with their own imitative poems. Give the students a topic and let their imaginations take care of the rest. You could even "jazz it up" by providing the students with a fun fly template to write their poems on and once they are complete, hang them for everyone to see. This book is great for first, second, third grade. You could even just use it as a read aloud to kindergarten.

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review 2015-11-12 18:45
Traditional tales for a younger audience
Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark - Alvin Schwartz,Stephen Gammell

For my full-length review, please visit Casual Debris.

 

Given its oral tradition and its transcendence of culture which contribute to its widespread popularity, the folk tale often lacks its intended wallop of surprise. Unless, of course you, are a youngster first encountering these tales. In my youth I was introduced to many such tales through reading young adult fiction (or as we called it back in the 80s, kids' books), including re-tellings of classic tales. I don't believe I've before encountered Alvin Schwartz's popular volumes, and reading them for the first time now evokes mixed responses. The book is certainly fun and the illustrations by Stephen Gammell are downright brilliant--unfortunately Schwartz's writing is at times indolent. His notes on these tales and their origins, however, are interesting, and it is great that he made the effort to share these stories with a younger contemporary audience, helping not only to spread them but to conserve them.

 

Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark is divided into four distinct sections...

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url 2015-10-23 18:43
"14 Terrifying Facts About 'Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark'"
Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark - Alvin Schwartz,Stephen Gammell

My sister just sent me this link. These books scared the crap out of us as kids, and now I'm trying to remember where our copies ended up.

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