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Search tags: Steven-Brust
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text 2017-03-19 08:16
3 Favorite Authors, 3 Witty Tweets

 

 

 

 

 

We look nothing alike. Nothing. And Emily is safely dead. Dead, I say. Why would you even imply that she is still alive & our clone-leader? https://t.co/aIBlYrRYfl

— Neil Gaiman (@neilhimself) March 3, 2017

 

 

Quote of the Day: "Political slogans serve oftener to
disguise interests than to call them by name." Trotsky

— Steven Brust (@StevenBrust) February 24, 2017
 

Indescribable is an adjective. Adjectives describe things.

— Mark Lawrence (@Mark__Lawrence) February 1, 2017
 
Click here for other posts in the series.
 

 

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text 2017-02-03 07:32
3 Favorite Authors, 3 Witty Tweets
The Way of Shadows - Brent Weeks
Prince of Thorns - Mark Lawrence
Jhereg - Steven Brust

 

 

 

 

Indescribable is an adjective. Adjectives describe things.

— Mark Lawrence (@Mark__Lawrence)
ML is the author of the Broken Empire Trilogy, which is amazeballs!

 

You say tomato, I point you to studies of variation of pronunciation on a geographical, historical, and class basis. #IAmNerd

— Steven Brust (@StevenBrust)
SB is writing the Vlad Taltos novels that are still being written (Thank god!). Be amazed by the beautiful cover of the latest book in the series!

 

It's important to have a code phrase to let people know if you've been kidnapped or are communicating under duress. Mine is, "Mmmm, kale!"

— Brent Weeks (@BrentWeeks)
BW wrote the Night Angel trilogy. The protagonist of the series is on my list of favorite assassins.
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photo 2017-02-03 07:01

 

 
 
Tor has revealed the cover for the 15th Vlad Taltos novel. The series is written by Steven Brust. Check out Tor's post to see the complete picture and a book blurb to see of it is something that you'd like to try!
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review 2017-01-20 19:07
The Incrementalists by Steven Brust & Skylar White - My Thoughts
The Incrementalists - Skyler White,Steven Brust

The Incrementalists - Book 1

What the HELL did I just read?

The premise sounded really cool - as writer John Scalzi said "Secret societies, immortality, murder mysteries and Las Vegas all in one book? Shut up and take my money." But the execution... oh, the execution...

The story is told from the first person POV of two characters, Phil and Renée 'Ren', and they alternate, one character taking up the tale in just about the next line from the other. And that's okay, I'm fine with multiple points of view in either 3rd or 1st person.

But what they did for the most part was prattle on about their 'mind powers', their histories, their concerns, their lies, their questionable emotions... dear God, it was like a huge circle jerk!

I honestly don't really know what's going on - it's all rather vague and confused in my brain and I don't think I'm an especially dense person. This book left me feeling rather dumb. What was the point? I have to say, I was left with a lack of desire to run out and get book 2, that's for sure.

Usually I enjoy Steven Brust - his Phoenix Guard books are among my favourites - but this one? Just felt like he and his friend were postulating their philosophical and political thoughts disguised as dialogue - inner and outer - of their characters. And it was confusing and quite often boring.

So, sadly, this book was a disappointment.

 

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review 2016-12-15 17:57
Taltos / Steven Brust
Taltos - Steven Brust

Journey to the land of the dead. All expenses paid!

Not my idea of an ideal vacation, but this was work. After all, even an assassin has to earn a living.

The trouble is, everyone knows that a living human cannot walk the Paths of the Dead, and return, alive, to the land of men.

But being an Easterner is not exactly like being human, by Dragaeran standards anyway. Thus, the rule doesn't apply to me... I hope.

 

Another prequel, as we learn both how Vlad came to the be ruthless assassin that he is and how he got involved in/survived one of his old war stories. Brust must not have figured out yet how to move on after book 3, in which Vlad and his wife, Cawti, find themselves in conflict over a resistance movement.

A return to the past gives us the old Vladimir, who is cheerfully amoral and who only experiences twinges of conscience from time to time. The wise-cracking Loiosh (his familiar, a flying lizard) provides some comic relief, as do Vlad’s wry comments. I am sure that Brust must have been familiar with Harry Harrison’s Stainless Steel Rat series—he created another charismatic criminal in Vlad, though maybe not quite so conscience-free as Slippery Jim DiGriz. Giving Vlad magical talents was an inspired addition.

Because there are two stories involved, there is a fair bit of shifting back and forth between the two. This can be a bit confusing until you get into the rhythm of it. Once you are aware of what to expect, things go smoothly.

Series like this one foreshadow the snarky, smart-cracking main characters that I currently enjoy in urban fantasy. Vlad’s weakness (teleportation makes him nauseous) humanizes him a bit. He also builds a group of people around himself—perhaps not friends, but at least co-operative allies. Those are perhaps some of the reasons why Vlad’s stories appeal to me as much as they do.  I can see Vlad as the predecessor of characters like Harry Dresden (The Dresden Files) and Atticus O'Sullivan (The Iron Druid).

 

Book 234 of my Science Fiction and Fantasy reading project.

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