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review 2017-11-29 15:25
Dig Two Graves: A Gripping Crime Thriller (The Detective Solomon Gray Series Book 1) - Keith, Terry NIXON, Allison STONES, BUSBY

10 years ago, sergeant Gary's six year old son disappeared at a fun fair. Needless to say that this tragedy had a deep impact on Solomon Gray and his family. Now he is investigating the suicide/murder of a sixteen year old boy and the murder of a priest(who was well known to his wife).The thing is, I just couldn't connect with Solomon Gray. He is aggressive, keeps vital information to himself, lies,is arrogant, self centered...He is just thoroughly unpleasant(in any normal police station he would have been put on indeterminate leave a long time ago). That said,his character is extremely well elaborated while the other characters are cardboard figures, pastiches perhaps. One has the impression that the story is not so important, that it comes second to the development of the character of Solomon Gray...

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review 2017-10-24 21:21
Yeah, not so much...
The Cursing Stones (Avalon Rising) (Volu... The Cursing Stones (Avalon Rising) (Volume 1) - Sonya Bateman

It is always risky to go for a retelling of the most famous legends - like Avalon, Arthurian legends and so on.

 

And this was not really interesting.

 

It felt off and didn't manage to really generate interest in the main characters.

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review 2017-09-29 13:13
I must watch this author
Sacred Stones of Ireland - Christine Zuc... Sacred Stones of Ireland - Christine Zucchelli

Another excellent read alongside the book on Irish Trees, books I must buy for my own library as they're useful travel guides to the unusual to be found in Ireland, stones that have been associated with myth and legend and unusual goings on abound in Ireland.

 

I do know that there were a few ogham stones removed from places (including my home place) by overzealous Victorians and brought to museums because the people of that place didn't value them enough or hadn't been educated on what was interesting about those stones, disconnecting them from the heritage they once had and the stories that some others may have had about them.

 

Unlike many similar books of the past the author is quite respectful of non-christian religions, both modern and ancient.

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review 2017-08-14 20:33
The morning fog, every morning
A Goddess in the Stones: Travels in India - Norman Lewis

I read this for the BookLikes-opoly game.  Somewhere back in my blog posts is the history. . . .

 

Anyway, I got the Kindle edition free when Open Road Media was giving stuff away last year, and it fit whatever square it was that I landed on.  So I read it.  I knew nothing about author Norman Lewis, and not a whole lot about India, other than what I've picked up reading a few novels set there -- The Far Pavilions, Shadow of the Moon, The Zemindar, The India Fan, Blood Moon over Bengal and The Moonstone.

 

Lewis sets out in the early 1990s on an exploration of a part of India that the tourists don't see, where the indigenous tribes still live supposedly much the same way they have for centuries.  I was expecting something like Margaret Mead or Bronislaw Malinowski, and I was even prepared to set aside what I expected to be Lewis's racist, colonial point of view in order to enjoy the book.

 

The racism and colonialism are there, but there wasn't much else.  The hotels were bad, the food was bad, the phone service was bad, the roads were bad, and Lewis never got to see any animals.  No tigers, no elephants.  Every morning he and his driver set out in the fog, and there were such lyrical descriptions of the fog, as though some dramatic, evocative narrative was going to unfold.  It never did.

 

Government was intruding on the tribes, tearing down their traditional homes and replacing them with concrete houses.  That's the primary thing I came away with, other than the fog.  Tribe after tribe - I've forgotten their names, which were often similar to each other -- with little in-depth exploration and virtually no personification.

 

Was there a goddess in the stones of the temples he encountered?  Oh, I think so, but I'm not sure.  Not enough of one to be memorable.  The book just didn't live up to the title, or even the cover.

 

I finished it, because I truly wanted to learn.  All I learned was that there was nothing there.  Not even a tiger or an elephant.

 

 

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