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text 2018-06-10 21:42
Reading progress update: I've read 13%.
The Penguin Pool Murder - Stuart Palmer

I know I'm supposed to be finishing my library books so I can get to Homicide Sanitarium, but Kobo is having a sale that had some interesting old mysteries, so I'm trying to figure out if I'd actually want to read more from the series in question.

 

But I'm also sleepy. So very sleepy.

 

So far it's cute though. A 1930s schoolteacher is supposed to get involved in a murder investigation after she discovers a body when on a fieldtrip with her class. She can be amusingly forceful. A couple excerpts:

 

"Who was the first person to see the body?”
Miss Withers stepped forward. “I was. Go ahead, young man.”
It nettled Piper to be called a young man by a woman who could not have been any older than he was.

and

“Okay, then. Your full name?”
“Hildegarde Martha Withers.”
“Address?”
“One-eleven West Seventy-sixth Street. I share an apartment there with two other teachers.”
“Occupation?”
“At present, answering foolish questions. Young man, I told you I was a teacher.”

That last line (At present, answering foolish questions) makes me giggle.

 

 

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review 2018-05-28 03:38
Winter's Edge - Anne Stuart

I think calling this a romance is a stretch, Harlequin stamp notwithstanding.

 

The heroine has amnesia. And she's not liking what she sees, either in herself, or in others. Even better, someone is out to get her, and her husband doesn't believe her.

 

The hero's reason for marrying the heroine seems to be a business arrangement gone awry. Basically, his dad left him the property, and her the money.

 

Problems arose when a married chick he'd been screwing around with (makes face) and his/the heroine's distant aunt plant all sorts of seeds of doubt in the heroine's mind while she's getting ready for the wedding. And then problems start. The heroine runs in fear for her life.

 

She awakens in a hospital with no memory of what happened, but she was found in a car with a dead man, and a lot of cash. The dead man, as it turns out, was her father, and he was strangled.

 

Eventually the culprit outs himself, the H/h get together, the end.

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text 2018-05-18 18:29
Little Kid Reads Are Fun
The Mouse and the Motorcycle - Tracy Dockray,Louis Darling,Beverly Cleary
Stuart Little - E.B. White,Garth Williams
Justin Morgan Had a Horse - Marguerite Henry,Wesley Dennis
Guardians of Ga'Hoole #2: The Journey - Kathryn Lasky
Wings of Fire Book Five: The Brightest Night - Tui T. Sutherland
Trials of Apollo, The Book One The Hidde... Trials of Apollo, The Book One The Hidden Oracle - Rick Riordan

Sometimes you just need to go back and enjoy so old classics you never got a chance to read as a child. I have been buying a bunch so my son can read them, and I figure well, why not? I have most all of the Guardians of Ga'HooleWarriors and several other children's classics like Charlotte's Web and King of the Wind. I loved those when I was younger. I think I will try to read a bunch of these over the next few weeks to help me with my slump and brighten my day. School let out so....yeah. I'm mom 24/7 until late August, and the hubs is leaving for a trip soon. I can use some cheering up. I love summer, and I dread summer. We are frenemies.

 

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review 2018-05-16 01:18
The Fall of Maggie Brown - Anne Stuart

4 stars for being well-written and an easy read. -.5 for the H being too busy being a dick to notice they were being followed...and he's apparently head of security?!

 

So the h and her late father have spent much of their lives keeping her mom and twin sister out of trouble/cleaning up after them. Father is gone now and the job falls on h. Her mother has "decided" she's dying and persuades h to take off to a small country that just happens to be in the middle of a revolution of sorts (uh...geez.)

 

H and sister's lover decide to keep h busy by going on a wild goose chase and making her miserable. H of course is chauffeuring her around...and somehow manages to a)miss being followed by an assassin he'd gotten the best of twice and b)not check his wheels for a tracking device. He hears that the guy is after his friend (sister's lover) so makes a beeline to warn him - without making *any* effort to see if he's being followed.

 

H/h manage to strand themselves on a bad road during a rain storm and they just...stick to the road (you'd think he'd have at least some survival training). They stop for the night in an abandoned house where they're too busy to notice assassin helping himself to the H's guns (!)

 

Of course, bad guy does get his just desserts, h's sister gets married (and gives birth shortly afterward, H apologizes for being an ass...and h's sister informs her that supposedly dying mom is in Vegas with a male friend.

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review 2018-05-04 19:34
If you believe in the power of stories and love magic, theatre, families, and heart-warming novels, you must read this feel-good book. Love at first-read.
Days of Wonder - Keith Stuart

Thanks to NetGalley and to Little, Brown and Company UK (Clara Díaz in particular) for providing me an ARC copy of this book that I freely chose to review.

I read and reviewed Keith Stuart’s first novel A Boy Made of Blocks, a truly extraordinary book, a couple of years ago, and loved it. I could not resist when I was offered the opportunity to read the author’s second novel. And, again, it was love at first read.

Days of Wonder has some similarities to A Boy. It does center on the relationship between a father and his child (in this case, Hannah), and how their relationship is shaped by a specific condition affecting the child (Asperger’s in the first novel, a chronic cardiac illness that cannot be cured and will only get worse in this novel). All the characters are beautifully portrayed, not only the protagonists but, in this case, also an array of secondary characters that become an ersatz family unit.

Tom, the father, runs a small theatre and has close links to the amateur theatrical group. His wife, Elizabeth, left the family when their daughter was three and leads the life of a high-flier, with no real contact with her family. Hannah has grown-up in the theatre, surrounded by the players and by stories, both on stage and out.

The book, narrated in the first person by both Tom and Hanna (mostly in alternating chapters, although towards the end there are some that follow the same character’s point of view, due to the logic of the story). Hannah’s narration in the present is interspersed with what appear to be diary entries addressed to Willow, (the theatre is called The Willow Tree). She is a strong girl, who loves her father, the theatre and the players, her friends, and who has a can-do attitude, despite her serious illness, or perhaps because of it. She knows how valuable each moment is, and lives it to the fullest (within her limitations). She is worried about her father and how much he has focused his life on her and decides that he must find a woman and live a fuller life. She loves comics, fairy-tales, is funny (having a sense of humour does help in such a situation, without a doubt), witty, and wise beyond her years, whilst being a credible teenager who worries about boys and can sometimes have questionable judgement. I challenge anybody not to fall in love with Hannah, her enthusiasm, and her zest for life.

Tom is a father who tries his hardest in a very difficult situation, and who sometimes finds himself in above his head, unable to function or to decide, frozen by the enormity of the situation. He is one of the good guys, he’d do anything to help anybody, and some of his philosophical reflections are fairly accurate, although, like most of us, he’s better at reading others than at understanding himself. His date disasters provide some comic relief but he is somebody we’d all love to count as a friend. Or, indeed, a father.

One of my favourite characters is Margaret, an older woman who has become a substitute grandmother for Hannah, and who is absolutely fabulous, with her anecdotes, her straight speaking, her X-ray vision (she knows everything that goes on even before the people involved realise what is going on sometimes), and she is a bit like the fairy-godmother of the fairy tales Hannah loves so much. As for the rest, Callum, Hannah’s boyfriend, is a very touching character, with many problems (the depiction of his depression is accurate and another one of the strong points of a book full of them), and the rest of the theatre crew, although they appear to be recognisable types at first sight (the very busy mother who wants some space for herself, the very capable woman whose husband is abusive, a retired man whose relationship with his wife seems to be falling apart, a gay man who can’t confess his attraction for another member of the group…), later come across as genuine people, truly invested in the project, and happy to put everything on the line for the theatre.

The novel is set in the UK and it has many references that will delight the anglophiles and lovers of all-things-British, from language quirks to references to plays, movies, TV series and festivals. (Oh, and to local politics as well), but I’m sure that the lack of familiarity with them will not hinder the readers’ enjoyment. Although there are also quite a number of references to theatre plays and comics (and I don’t know much about comics, I confess), they never overwhelm the narration and are well integrated into the story, adding to its depth.

The book deals in serious subjects (family break-ups, abuse, chronic physical and mental illnesses [affecting young people, in particular], aging and death, growing-up, single-parent families) and whilst it makes important points about them, which many readers will relate to, they are seamlessly incorporated into the fabric of the novel, and it never feels preachy or as if it was beating you over the head with a particular opinion or take on the topic.

Reading the author’s comment above, I can vouch for his success. This is indeed a book about love, life, and magic. It is a declaration of love to the world of theatre and to the power of stories. The novel is beautifully written, flows well, and the readers end up becoming members of their troupe, living their adventures, laughing sometimes and crying (oh, yes, get the tissues ready) at other times. Overall, despite its sad moments, this is a hopeful feel-good book, heart-warming and one that will make readers feel at peace with themselves and the world. It has a great ending and although I wondered at first if the epilogue was necessary, on reflection, it is the cherry on top of the trifle. Perfect.

The book is endlessly quotable and I’ve highlighted a tonne of stuff, but I couldn’t leave you without sharing something.

Here is Hanna, talking about magic:

I don’t mean pulling rabbits out of hats or sawing people in half (and then putting them back together: otherwise it’s not magic, it’s technically murder). I just mean the idea that incredible things are possible, and that they can be conjured into existence through will, effort and love.

As I’m writing this review on Star Wars Day, I could not resist this quote, again from Hannah:

I feel as though it’s closing in around me, like the trash-compactor scene in Star Wars, except I have no robots to rescue me although I do have an annoying beeping box next to the bed doing a twenty-four-hours-a-day impression of R2-D2.

Oh, and another Star Wars reference:

It’s as though the spirit of Margaret is working through me, like a cross between Maggie Smith and Yoda.

And a particularly inspiring one:

Margaret told me that you must measure life in moments —because unlike hours or days or weeks or years, moments last forever. I want more of them. I am determined. I will steal as many as I can.

A beautiful book, a roller-coaster of emotions, and an ode to the power of stories, to their magic, and to family love, whichever way we choose to define family. I urge you to read it. You’ll feel better for it. And I look forward to reading more books by its author, who has become one of my favourites.

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