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review 2018-05-23 02:45
What's that joke about a gorilla and a typewriter?
The Murderer's Ape - Jakob Wegelius

I love a good Swedish to English translation (except for that one time I attempted Wallander) so I thought that The Murderer's Ape by Jakob Wegelius would be no exception. However, I cannot unequivocally state that I loved this book...or that I loathed it. The book is told from the standpoint of a gorilla who has been christened Sally Jones. She's been around humans her entire life and therefore not only understands what they are saying but can read as well. She's a gifted engineer who the reader discovers has the ability to figure out most mechanical devices be they accordions or airplanes. (This is integral to the storyline.) Her best friend is a (human) man she refers to as Chief and who took her on as a partner when he got his own ship. But all of this was before they ran into some trouble. Without giving too much away, the two are separated and Sally is forced to adapt in order to survive. At its heart, this is an adventure story with a lot of drama. What I enjoyed were the illustrations which were done by the author and accompanied the heading of each chapter as well as a gallery of character portraits at the very beginning. Some of the issues I had with this novel were in its dealings with race, religion, and ethnicity. It was hard for me to pinpoint if the problems I had could be explained by viewing it through the lens of the time in which the novel took place but I found them unsettling nonetheless. Overall, I wasn't totally blown away but I wouldn't throw it out of an airplane door either. 4/10

 

Source: American Library Association

 

Examples of the illustrations. [Source: Playing by the book]

 

 

What's Up Next: Golda Meir: A Strong, Determined Leader by David A. Adler

 

What I'm Currently Reading: The House With a Clock in Its Walls by John Bellairs

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
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text 2018-03-22 14:11
TBR Thursday
The Shoe on the Roof - Will Ferguson
Vlad: The Last Confession - C.C. Humphreys
The Gentle Art of Swedish Death Cleaning: How to Free Yourself and Your Family from a Lifetime of Clutter - Margareta Magnusson
Still Life - Louise Penny
Now I Rise (The Conqueror's Trilogy) - Kiersten White
The House at Baker Street (A Mrs Hudson and Mary Watson Investigation) - Michelle Birkby

In the docket for the next week and a bit....

 

For my 2018 PopSugar challenge, The Shoe on the Roof by Will Ferguson will be my book about mental health.

 

Still Life by Louise Penny will be the P entry for my Women Authors A-Z list.  Now I Rise by Kiersten White will likewise be my W entry.

 

And then, just for fun, Vlad : the Last Confession by C.C. Humphreys.  I met Humphreys as last year's When Words Collide conference here in Calgary.  As a result, I recommended that my public library buy his latest book, the above.  Now it is my duty to read it.  :)

 

The House at Baker Street just seemed like too much fun to pass up and I've been patiently waiting for it for some time.  The same with The Gentle Art of Swedish Death Cleaning, which I hope will kick-start my spring cleaning (if spring ever deigns to show its face here).

 

Have a lovely weekend, friends and happy reading!

 

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url 2017-10-31 12:28
En läsande hjärna formas i tidig ålder

Är det någon gång i livet du bör läsa böcker är det mellan sex och tio års ålder. Då är hjärnan som mest formbar. Men hjärnans språkliga funktioner kan utvecklas ända in i pensionsåldern.

Source: www.dn.se/kultur-noje/en-lasande-hjarna-formas-i-tidig-alder
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review 2017-10-22 18:15
Little Star, by John Ajvide Lindqvist
Little Star: A Novel - John Ajvide Lindqvist

After seeing the recent adaptation of Stephen King's It, I was inspired to delve into a big, fat horror novel (I already read It a few summers ago); plus, 'tis the season. John Ajvide Lindqvist has been referred to as Sweden's Stephen King, and I can see why. What I like most about King's writing is his characterization: characters feel like real people, no matter how fantastical, or evil. Little Star is my second Lindqvist novel, and he has a similar gift for creating engaging characters.

 

In some ways, though, I find his horror even more frightening than King's. He has a way of providing the details that are often skipped over in horror movies, such as the way the human body reacts to terror. Acts of violence are shockingly brutal (early in the novel a husband savagely breaks his wife's kneecap). He also appears to be interested in children as protagonists, especially girls. Little Star, like Let the Right One In, the other Lindqvist novel I read, features two children as the characters who drive the narrative. One (Theres) does not seem to be quite human (like the vampire in the latter novel), while the other (Theresa) is a human who is an outcast (like the boy who befriends the vampire). Each one's story is told separately at first, including their parents' points of view, until they meet--virtually and then in person. At this point we know the two will be frightening together.

 

Much of this novel details the angst and alienation of young girls, which can be painful to read if you're a woman who felt like an outsider at some point during your childhood. That alienation is weaponized; it's a freight train whose collision you can't stop but also can't look away from. It reminded me of Dietland, which I read a while ago and is not a horror novel, or even Kill the Boy Band and The Girls. I suppose I'm drawn to stories where patriarchal suppression erupts in violence.

 

I was left with a question or two, including Theres's origins (she's left to die as an infant in a forest before being discovered) and the red smoke she and the girls feed on. I also wanted a bit more of Theres's adoptive mother's perspective at the beginning.

 

Despite these questions, this novel shocked, disturbed, and awed me. I tore through it. AND I learned about several Swedish pop stars!

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review 2017-05-28 00:00
Swedish Christmas Crafts
Swedish Christmas Crafts - Helene S. Lundberg Cute crafts. Can't wait to try a few.
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