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review 2017-03-08 12:03
Story of your Life
Stories of Your Life and Others - Ted Chiang,Abby Craden,Todd McLaren

Ted Chiang's "Story of Your Life" was the basis for the new film "The Arrival." The story itself is a thoughtful meditation on the meaning of one's time on earth, and the choices we make. The movie takes it in a more plot-driven direction. But what's brilliant about the movie is that it preserves the central idea of Ted's story.

If you read the entire anthology of these stories, it's also interesting to observe that Ted's general approach is a meditative questioning of the meaning of our work, our relationships and our being in the world. I personally love these kind of slowly thoughtful and illuminating stories. But perhaps they are not for everyone. If you like your SF fast and furious, Ted Chiang is probably not your cup of tea.

Oh, and I had the pleasure of meeting Ted recently and talking with him at length. His style reflects his stories: gracious, thoughtful and insightful. A true pleasure!

Source: nednote.com
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review 2017-02-09 18:52
Confessions of a Pagan Nun
Confessions of a Pagan Nun - Kate Horsley

Ireland, c500 AD

 

Giannon's home was a configuration of branches, stones, and mud. A dome and a shed of these materials leaned against one another like old drunken warriors at a banquet. All around these structures was a variety of grasses, blossoms, and bushes that I had never seen before. Drying herbs, jars on tethers, and staffs of yew and oak hung on the sides of his dwelling so that it reminded me of Giannon himself when he travelled beneath a tangle of druidic accessories. The clearing with its gardens and dwelling was empty of human life, though a ragged gray wolf scampered into the woods from there. Some might say that the wolf was Giannon transformed, but I only had the sense that the wolf was hungry and weak, for the past winter had been fiercely cold.

 

I entered the dwelling and found the inside also strung with dried plants, jars, and staffs. There were shelves on which a chaos of boxes and jars sat along with feathers and scrolls and dust. The only furnishings were a table, a small bench, and a bed made of straw covered with the skins of bear and fox. More scrolls, codices, and tablets sat upon these furnishings, as though the originals had multiplied in some orgy when their master was away.

 

I walked carefully through this strange chamber, afraid that all of Giannon's belongings and the dwelling itself were capable of collapsing into a dusty pile of rubble. And I believed that a druid's dwelling could likely be set with spells from which I would emerge transformed into a beetle or a bee. I waited for Giannon outside, until the world grew dim and I could see wolves running along the tree line beyond the small clearing in which Giannon's home nested. Finally I saw Giannon approach …

 

This book has as its setting the period when the Church moved in and took over Ireland. It is the story of Gwynneve, who trains as a Ban-druí (druidess) under a surly and disillusioned druid watching his order pass into history as the tonsured monks and priests swarm over the land.

 

But two stories run concurrently, in alternate chapters. Gwynneve's story of her childhood with her wonderful mother -

 

My father accused my mother of starving me by filling me up with stories instead of food. Everyone in my túath was hungry, especially during the months of thick frost. But I did not want food as much as I craved her stories, which soothed me. I listened to my mother weave words together and create worlds, as though she were a goddess. Words came from her mouth and dispelled my loneliness, even when she was not with me. She began every story with the phrase "It was given to me that …"

 

- and then, when her mother died, her story of her life with Giannon the druid. Meanwhile, in the other chapters, we learn about the life she leads now as a nun among other Christian nuns who are drifting helplessly under the authority of a monk, Brother Adrianus, one of a small band who joined the nuns at the shrine of St Brigit and who has assumed the title and dignity of Abbot.

 

It is, let me say at once, depressing in parts. How could it not be? But as Gwynneve the nun, in the convent that is becoming daily more like a prison (and longing for her druid lover) writes her story on her treasured parchments, it is also very moving and uplifting.

 

Take some of Gwynneve's views and comments (recorded in the secret diary). Faced with unbelievable ignorance and stupidity, she writes: "I admonish myself and all who read this not to be ignorant on any matters of which knowledge is available. Do not be afraid of the truth …"

 

And later: "For we both both were weak in doctrine and strong in questions. But we both loved effort and knowledge, though I saw Giannon become weary in his eyes. I do not understand a man who does not want to know all that he can know."

 

On the loneliness of incarnation: "Among all the wisdom and facts I learned from Giannon, I also learned the loneliness of incarnation, in which there is inevitably a separation of souls because of the uniqueness of our faces and our experiences."

 

On God and nature: "I cannot see that any religion is true that does not recognize its gods in the green wave of trees on a mountainside or the echo of a bird's song that makes ripple on a shadowed pool […] This land is full of holiness that I cannot describe.  Brigit knows this. Brigit to me is the wisest of all the saints. She knows the value of ale and the comfort of poetry."

 

On Christ and kindness: "That Christ fed fish and bread to the poor and spoke to the outcast whore makes me want his company on this dark night. The world is full of immortals but sorely lacking in kindness."

 

It is indeed. And the end is truly shocking. Not depressing, no, on second thoughts. Tragic.

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review 2017-01-25 02:51
Poignant & Touching Graphic Novel
The Arrival - Shaun Tan

 

This is a gorgeous graphic novel that embodies the immigrant experience. Because there are no words, the reader can decode the meaning for themselves. When the main character travels to a new land, he is faced with an alien environment. The surreal pictures make it so the environment doesn't look like any particular place. As the character makes his way through the world, he is faced with strange symbols, strange creatures and strange food. Literally everything is strange to him and to the reader. Because there are no words, I took more time to look at each picture to figure out exactly what the character was going through.

 

This is a touching story that can be shared with readers from age 10 to adult. Schools could pair it with history lessons. Families who move to a new place could share the book with their kids. This book helps any reader understand a bit of what immigrants go through. Highly recommended.

 

I read this book for my Multicultural literature class.

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review 2016-10-12 01:13
Poignant artistry
The Bird King and Other Sketches - Shaun Tan
The Arrival - Shaun Tan

As promised in my post on Tales From Outer Suburbia, I have continued my quest to read more of Shaun Tan's works. I managed to get my hands on The Arrival and The Bird King: An Artist's Notebook. I love how diverse Tan is and these two books definitely showcase his range of abilities. The Bird King features his art in a variety of formats from half-formed doodles to pastels. He explains that by continuously working on his art he is able to improve his craft. It's a way to brainstorm ideas which he may or may not use in future books. He also uses it as an exercise for drawing realistic portraits. It's really minimal text-wise but very informative for students of art which is really his intended audience I think. It's difficult to explain just how powerful The Arrival is because it felt deeply personal to me. Tan manages to tell this deeply moving story without any words whatsoever. The Arrival is the story of a man who leaves his family behind to travel to a new country where he hopes to establish himself and send for his family. Everything seems alien and surreal and Tan depicts this by using fantasy elements such as tentacled animals for pets, giants sharing the skies with skyscrapers, and huge men in hazmat suits who spray poison at the unsuspecting people scurrying below. It's the wordless story of fear of the unknown and the desire to find a better place to escape the troubles of home. It struck me right in the solar plexus. The art is beautiful, the story is stirring, and the delivery is spot-on. If you want to learn what it's like start over and feel like you've entered an unfamiliar landscape then I highly recommend this book. 10/10

 

From The Bird King: A haunting portrait of solitude.

 

Reminds me of Tales From Outer Suburbia.

 

From The Arrival: The fear of crossing into the great unknown.

 

Clinging to the familiar.

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
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review 2016-06-24 01:48
The Arrival
Animorphs #38: The Arrival - K.A. Applegate

I'm in the middle of the terrible ghostwritten books (the stretch I was remembering earlier this month), but there was a large (welcome) jump in quality from The Weakness to this one. I wasn't sure about the beginning of the book, but it gets better as it goes.

 

More discussion under the cut because it's all a little spoilery.

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