logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: The-Empty-Room
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2017-03-16 12:32
Blog Tour Stop for The Empty Room by Sarah J. Clemens with Excerpt and Giveaway
 
Today’s stop is for Sarah J. Clemens’s The Empty Room . We will have info about the book and author, and a great excerpt from the book, plus a great giveaway. Make sure to check everything out and enter the giveaway. Happy Reading :)
 
AbtheB
 
 
Rain soaked and dreary, it was a 1901 abandoned Victorian that newlyweds Dean and Elizabeth Montgomery hoped would fulfill their dreams of a new start in life, even if the town of Eastbrook, Maine was nestled under a constant blanket of fog.
The first neighbor the couple meets dashes those hopes when he raises a bizarre question: what happened to the last person who lived in their house? A cryptic question, but nothing to worry about. At least not until the couple looked under the floorboards inside the house.
Under mounting pressure from the residents of Eastbrook to stop questioning the past, Dean and Elizabeth are driven deeper into the history of the house, the town, and their neighbors. When the couple discovers what happened in Eastbrook, keeping the secret could save their lives, but uncovering the truth might be worth the risk.
 
What happened inside The Empty Room is a mystery until the last page. A gripping psychological suspense, the story takes readers on a cat-and-mouse game where some secrets are better off hidden.
goodreads-badge-add-plus-
Buy Link 
amazonBig
 
 
 Excer
The two were quite uncertain as to why it seemed so difficult to step inside the room. They had trampled across every inch of the house and looked through the belongings of a man they had never met, but felt as though they were intruding to even stand outside the door of an empty room. Dean was a problem solver though and had finally settled on a way to get over that feeling. As he stood behind Elizabeth, just outside of the door frame, and with his coffee cup still in one hand, he put the palm of his hand on her back and gave a strong push. She stumbled awkwardly into the room. “There,” he said proudly as he took a sip. “What do you think?” “I think that you’re going to have a hard time sleeping tonight,” she replied. He found it ironic that he had already weighed that possibility before he shoved her, and had still decided to do so. He smiled. “I’m good with that.” He took a few faltering steps behind her before taking a deep breath and stepping inside completely. They both looked around and identified the same exact features they had seen the first time they stood outside the door: an entirely empty room with a sheer white curtain covering the only window, now with a new perspective standing inside. Compared to the rest of the rooms in the house, this room was small. It had a closet on the left wall and the window on the back wall, which looked out into the backyard. There was nothing special or unique about the room, except this one wasn’t crammed to the ceiling with personal touches. Dean and Elizabeth stared at each other as though competing for a prize in a contest, when Dean’s concentration fixated on something else. She followed the direction of his eyes to the wall behind her which had abruptly claimed his attention. He had only stepped a few feet inside of the room when he eyed something on the east wall behind his wife. As he walked around her, she turned to look. He still clenched his coffee cup tightly in his left hand but reached up his right hand and ran his palm along the wall. Elizabeth stood in silence behind him and waited for an explanation. His hand paused in areas and then continued up and down until he reached the corner of the room. The wallpaper, which was striped with thick bands of blue and slender bands of green, had stolen his concept of the English language, and he ignored his wife’s persistent calling of his name. “Dean? Dean. Dean!” she insisted without a response from him. She approached him from behind and grabbed ahold of his shoulder and shook him. He stumbled back upon reality long enough to mumble, “What is that?” he said, half dazed. Elizabeth’s curiosity had remained occupied on her husband’s behavior until she too caught sight of what he had been eyeing. Covered by the blue and green wallpaper was the faint and somewhat abstract outline of something beneath the paper. “Go get me something to get this wallpaper down.” The sound of his voice was urgent. He sat his coffee up on the window sill and ran both hands along the wall. Elizabeth froze for a moment before turning toward the door. She had just reached the hall when he called out, “Hey, wait. Look at this. It peels off.” She turned sharply on her heel and headed back toward him. “Here, can you help me with this? I’ll grab the top corner,” he said. Each gripping a piece of wallpaper, they slowly pulled back the sun-faded sheets as it wilted off the wall. The persistent rain and wet weather, along with a poorly insulated window would make for some mold problems later on down the road, but for now, it made the process of removing wallpaper move at a much more rapid speed, and with their joint efforts the paper pulled cleanly off the wall. The two stood with the now crinkled wallpaper clutched in their hands. Dean released his grip and dropped the ball of paper. He took a step back from the freshly unveiled wall. “What on…” Elizabeth’s mouth gaped open and she seemed faced with the same loss of speech that her husband had experienced moments ago. The wall, originally painted a now-faded yellow color, was splattered in red. Dean reclaimed the step that he sacrificed an instant earlier and squinted at the wall. The two had questioned the intentions of a man who would leave everything he owned behind and they had possibly found the answer, but now, the question shifted to whether or not they wanted to know.
Abouttheauth
 
 
Sarah J. Clemens is the author of the debut mystery novel, The Empty Room. She started writing The Empty Room in 2008 and formed her own imprint in 2016 called Off the Page Publishing.
She started out her professional career working as a news assistant for her local newspaper before finding a passion for the law and pursued an education in criminal justice. In addition to writing fiction, she is also a legal assistant with an Associate of Arts and a Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice with an emphasis in Human Services.
 
Sarah was born in California and now lives and works in Boise, Idaho. She has the same sarcastic sense of humor as the characters in her books, and she has an unparalleled love for animals.
 
 
GA
 
 
 

a Rafflecopter giveaway

  BS

Feb 23- kickoff at the Silver Dagger Scriptorium

Feb 23- Fabulous and Brunette

Feb 24- What Is That Book About

Feb 24- The Book Town

Feb 24- Stormy Nights Reviewing and Bloggin

Feb 27- The Book Adventures of Annelise Lestrange

Feb 27- Nerdy Dirty & Flirty

Feb 27- Lucky 13 Book Reviews and News

Feb 28- The Avid Reader

Feb 28- Bound 2 Escape

Feb 28- Mommabear's Book Blog

Mar 1- Castles Made of Books

Mar 1- Tome Tender

Mar 1- Angels With Attitudes Book Reviews

Mar 2- The Authors Blog

Mar 2- Books Dreams Life

Mar 3- Lisa- Queen of Random

Mar 3- A Mama's Corner of the World

Mar 6- Julayn Adams Books and Reviews

Mar 6- Turning Another Page

Mar 7- US Brazil Book Reviews

Mar 7- Yah Gotta Read This

Mar 8- I Love Books

Mar 8- Just a Little R&R

Mar 9- Laurie's Thoughts and Reviews

Mar 9- The Bookworm Chronicles

Mar 10- Ramblings of a Coffee Addicted Writer

Mar 10- Traci Hayden

Mar 13- fuonlyknew

Mar 13- Sapphyria's Book Reviews

Mar 14- Teatime and Books

Mar 14- Jazzy Book Reviews

Mar 15- Tales of a WannaBe Superhero Mom

Mar 15- Am Kinda Busy Reading- REVIEW

Mar 16- SnoopyDoo's Book Reviews

Mar 16- The Reading Spot

Mar 17- TMBA Corbett Tries To Write

Mar 17- CelticLady's Reviews

Mar 20- fallxnrobin- REVIEW

Mar 20- Loves Great Reads

Mar 21- Linz ReadzREVIEW

Mar 21- Shh, I Am Reading

Mar 22- Shelf_Life- REVIEW

Mar 22- Authors & Readers Book Corner

Mar 23- Mello & June

 

 

Source: snoopydoosbookreviews.com/blog-tour-stop-empty-room-sarah-j-clemens-excerpt-giveaway
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2017-03-01 06:00
The Empty Room by Sarah J. Clemens Blog Tour and Giveaway
 
The Empty Room
by Sarah J Clemens
 
Genre: Psychological Suspense, Thriller, Mystery
 
Rain soaked and dreary, it was a 1901 abandoned Victorian that newlyweds Dean and Elizabeth Montgomery hoped would fulfill their dreams of a new start in life, even if the town of Eastbrook, Maine was nestled under a constant blanket of fog.
The first neighbor the couple meets dashes those hopes when he raises a bizarre question: what happened to the last person who lived in their house? A cryptic question, but nothing to worry about. At least not until the couple looked under the floorboards inside the house.
Under mounting pressure from the residents of Eastbrook to stop questioning the past, Dean and Elizabeth are driven deeper into the history of the house, the town, and their neighbors. When the couple discovers what happened in Eastbrook, keeping the secret could save their lives, but uncovering the truth might be worth the risk.
What happened inside The Empty Room is a mystery until the last page. A gripping psychological suspense, the story takes readers on a cat-and-mouse game where some secrets are better off hidden.
 
 
Sarah J. Clemens is the author of the debut mystery novel, The Empty Room. She started writing The Empty Room in 2008 and formed her own imprint in 2016 called Off the Page Publishing.
She started out her professional career working as a news assistant for her local newspaper before finding a passion for the law and pursued an education in criminal justice. In addition to writing fiction, she is also a legal assistant with an Associate of Arts and a Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice with an emphasis in Human Services.
 
Sarah was born in California and now lives and works in Boise, Idaho. She has the same sarcastic sense of humor as the characters in her books, and she has an unparalleled love for animals.
 
 
 
You may find us here !
 
 
 


 
 
 
 
Like Reblog Comment
review 2016-08-09 00:00
The Empty Room
The Empty Room - Sarah J. Clemens My Review:
Newlyweds Dean and Elizabeth Montgomery buy their first home in Eastbrook Main. They buy it as is with all of the previous owners belongings still in the home. They were told the previous owner just walked away one day. They are excited to be living in a small town, both are from Chicago. They want the close knit living of the small town. What they get is anything but close knit to outsiders.

The town is cold to the pair. Then they discover there are secrets in the town. The more they find out about these secrets the weirder the town seems to react to them. Until Elizabeth goes missing.

This book left me kind of shocked at the ending. I wasn't expecting what happens after Elizabeth disappears. And I am not gonna say in this review.


The book is short but very interesting, at least it was to me. The story flowed and zoomed along at a great pace. I loved how it introduced you to different characters but yet did not tell you their secrets at first. The whole book just left me guessing through out, then explained itself in the end.
Like Reblog Comment
review 2014-08-11 00:00
The Empty Room
The Empty Room - Lauren B. Davis I finished this book just after hearing about the passing of Robin Williams. I can't help but draw parallels between the sadness and misery of severe depression and that of severe addiction. The two are so incredibly related. The feeling of powerlessness is completely overwhelming and sometimes, the only solution seems to be to kill the misery. Unfortunately for some, the death of misery is also the death of a life.

This book captures that kind of searing misery, the supreme despair that is found at the bottom of a bottle and heavily laden with demons and denial. It is said that an addict of any stripe needs to find their bottom before they can crawl out of the pits of their personal hell. Ms. Davis does an incredible job of taking us on the last crawl to the bottom for Colleen, the protagonist of this book. I suspect this is largely due to her own experience at the bottom.

For anyone whose ever struggled with alcohol or has been related to someone whose struggled with alcohol, they'll understand the pain of this book and will likely find it as incredible and disturbing as I did!!!

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2014-06-23 01:48
The Empty Room by Lauren B. Davis --- brilliant review on Truthdig.com by Jean Randich
The Empty Room - Lauren B. Davis

          

 

Book Review

The Empty Room

Posted on Jun 6, 2014

 

 

By Jean Randich

 “The Empty Room”
A book by Lauren B. Davis

“For R.E.D.—if it weren’t for you, this wouldn’t be fiction.” These sober words preface Lauren B. Davis’ devastating stream of consciousness novel, “The Empty Room.” It is the story of Colleen Kerrigan, an isolated, middle-aged woman with a serious drinking problem. Waking up Monday morning from a blackout bender, Colleen gazes at a postcard of Dylan Thomas’ writing shed at Laugharne. “The tiny room, the whitewashed walls, the simple desk and chair, the photos on the walls, the crumpled bits of paper, the bottle, the astonishing work Thomas created there. … This was Colleen’s idea of perfection.” Even in Colleen’s perfect idyll, the bottle claims its place. “They don’t call it spirits for nothing” is her nervous refrain. Where Davis’ writing blazes is in her ability to dissect the patterns of fear, denial, lies and justification that propel an alcoholic further into an addiction that destroys everything she has and is. 

By telling the story from Colleen’s point of view, Davis is able to blindside the reader the way Colleen’s binging and blackouts blindside her. When she first drinks, Colleen is sensual and relaxed—she delights in the fire coursing through her veins. But the highs ebb, and the accelerating dance of bad choices and worse behavior achieves an almost unbearable sense of dread.

Like James Joyce’s “Ulysses,” “The Empty Room” tracks an entire life that plays out in one day. Far worse than watching hung-over Colleen negotiate the Toronto subway and arrive late for work at the university, is to see her panic at a professor’s simple request for a stack of photocopies she was to have made. Davis makes you feel the sweat dripping from Colleen’s pores. Called on the carpet and confronted with her drinking, she is given a chance to go to rehab and keep her position. Colleen savagely bats back any intervention. Drink is a relationship so primal, she’d rather lose her job.

Davis’ narrative also intrigues structurally. As Colleen muddles through her day, random details trigger shameful memories that play like reruns in her head. We see Colleen as a child, stranded between an absent but loving alcoholic father and a bitter, mentally ill mother. As in her critically acclaimed novel, “Our Daily Bread,” Davis excels once again at quietly observing the cruelty children must survive at the hands of abusive parents. These flashbacks are inflected with a child’s point of view, so Colleen relives these horrors without gaining insight into the deep grooves they’ve etched. The reader, however, flinches as the patterns of cruelty amass.

Davis brings fierce honesty and compassion to Colleen’s odyssey. She doesn’t shy away from the ugliness and humiliation of alcoholism. Colleen foolishly opts to take placement tests at a temp agency while under the influence. She even buries a vodka-filled salad dressing bottle in her bag and sneaks it in with her—“just in case she got nervous.” Too befuddled to contend with the questions, Colleen interrupts an IQ test to steal a nip in the ladies room:

She found the friendly bottle, unwrapped it from its plastic overcoat, opened it and tilted it to her lips. Just a little and she’d relax. … It didn’t take much, just a small unthinking adjustment, and the salad dressing bottle slipped. She felt it go and snatched at it, but was too slow. She watched it fall to the floor and as it fell she thought, maybe it won’t break. Maybe it will just fall and I’ll be able to nab it and stuff it back in my bag with no one the wiser. Maybe it will be all right. 

The corner of the bottle hit the unforgiving tile and didn’t merely break, it exploded. Pink vodka flew everywhere. The woman in the other stall yipped, and for a moment Colleen feared a piece of glass might have struck her.

Then the room went still. Fumes rose to Colleen’s nostrils, acrid and unmistakably alcoholic.

“Is everything okay?” a woman’s voice said.

“Fine, thanks,” said Colleen. The woman, whoever she was, didn’t respond, and Colleen felt obliged to explain. “I dropped a bottle of salad dressing.”

A moment’s silence, and then “Bummer,” followed by a flush.

Davis employs black humor to create cognitive dissonance. Colleen remembers getting sick-drunk for the first time at age 14, and sees herself sprawled on the bathroom floor, her mother towering over her, about to slap her in the face: “This won’t hurt at all, she thought, and sure enough, it didn’t, and under the force of the blow her head turned in slow motion so that she could watch the toilet tank approaching her forehead, although she didn’t remember a thing after that.”

Davis is fascinated by alcohol’s capacity to distort perception. One of her most potent metaphors derives from Hans Christian Andersen’s fairy tale “The Snow Queen.” Colleen recalls the story as a childhood fable about the power of treacherous mirrors: “A wicked sprite fashioned a mirror with the power to make everything good and beautiful look ugly and mean, and all that was ugly and horrible look even more atrocious. The mirror was smashed into a hundred million and more pieces, some no larger than a grain of sand, and these flew about in the world, and when they got into people’s eyes, there they stayed, and then people saw everything perverted, or only liked looking at that which was evil. Splinters even found their way into the hearts of some people and that was the worst of all, for their hearts became like lumps of ice.”

Images of explosion, shattering and smashing proliferate. Colleen pours herself a glass of vodka: “It hit her belly like a grenade, sending shrapnel straight to her brain.” Colleen’s mother, Deirdre, wields a butcher knife, firing onion shards into the air, in the same way her husband and daughter flee the house. Only once does Colleen sense beauty and sanctuary—as a young woman alone on Christmas Day after her parents refuse to buy her a ticket home (“You’ve made your own mess, young lady, you’ll have to clean it up”), staring out a window in a scene that is a kind of emotional and spiritual touchstone:

“Round about four o’clock, when the sun was setting and the snow on the streets turned blue, she moved her chair from beside the unlit little fireplace, and sat at the bay window watching the Christmas world go by. … Then, as though everyone who had somewhere to go had arrived at their destination and not a creature was stirring, the world seemed to settle, to take a deep breath and sigh it out again. … For a moment it felt as though she were outside her body, watching a girl in a white bathrobe sitting on a spring-sprung old chair by a frosted window. Then suddenly she was back inside her skin, but in that moment peace had washed over her. She felt as though she needed no one and nothing. … She felt … well, companioned was the only word she could think of. She felt known by something greater than herself, some entity who knew her, all of her, and still loved her, not in spite of what they knew, but because of it. She felt clean, and utterly calm.”

Colleen’s fraying relationships with her failing mother, her estranged ex-lover, Jake, her agoraphobic elderly friend, Helen, and the surprising Pat Minot, are rendered with rich authenticity. But the revelation in Davis’ novel is her portrayal of Colleen’s tortured relationship with herself. Colleen burns every single possible bridge. With nothing left to burn, she shores herself up in her empty room.

“Emptiness wasn’t empty at all; it was a thick block of solid no-sound, no-presence. An empty room was filled with all the things that weren’t in it,” the author writes.

Davis knows the courage it takes to face that emptiness. She herself emerged, through grace and the help of an unnamed other, from alcoholism and addiction. Her unforgettable anti-heroine, Colleen Kerrigan, avoids that confrontation with emptiness up until the brink of death. But once Colleen accepts the reality of her life, she finally finds herself free to fill that emptiness “with anything at all.”

 

Source: www.truthdig.com/arts_culture/item/the_empty_room_20140606
More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?