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Search tags: The-Language-of-Dying
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review 2018-04-12 16:56
The Language of Dying - Sarah Pinborough

This is a short yet powerful novella that follows a woman as she sits by her dying father. As she narratives his final days we find out more about the man and his family, how each of his children have deal with their grief and how death can both unite and divide them.

 

There is a skill to writing a good novella. The prose has to be fluid yet tightly held together, providing a myriad of information in a succinct but entertaining way. This is such a novella. The unnamed narrator guides us through parts of her life, filling the pages with details of her dysfunctional and broken family history, introducing us to siblings and giving a glimpse into the life of the man that lays close to death upstairs.

It is hard to provide a lengthy review for such a short novella for fear of revealing too much and spoiling the story. That said, every reader will take away something different from the book. It may be for some that the book resonates too close to experiences they have been through, though that may provide comfort to others. There is no right or wrong way to grieve and that is what this book discusses.

 

This book is an essay on grief, on how we can grieve for something that has not yet gone, that we can mourn the loss of an idea, a feeling, a certainty just as much as the loss of a person. Although written from one person’s view this book can resonate with anyone, for grief is a universal emotion, though it may manifest itself in a myriad of ways, the underlying feelings are expertly expressed in The Language of Dying.

Whilst not an easy read this is a moving, thought-provoking look into loss.

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review 2017-05-27 17:15
The Language of Dying by Sarah Pinborough
The Language of Dying - Sarah Pinborough

Tonight is a special, terrible night. A woman sits at her father's bedside watching the clock tick away the last hours of his life. Her brothers and sisters - all traumatised in their own ways, their bonds fragile - have been there for the past week, but now she is alone. And that's always when it comes. As the clock ticks in the darkness, she can only wait for it to find her...

 
**********
 

The Language of Dying by Sarah Pinborough was a book that seemed to be fantastic and that a lot of my friends on Goodreads ( and other readers there) love. However, now and then am I the odd one out because this book didn't do a thing for me. I kept on expecting for the moment to show up when I would get enthralled and get sucked into the story, but it never happened.

Instead, it just dragged on, and this is not a thick book, only 144 pages long, but it felt like it took forever to get to the end. I just couldn't connect with the character nor the story. The fantasy aspect of the story was also a big failure. Instead of being mysterious and intriguing it was just odd and felt out of place. I wonder if the book and worked better if one had gotten to know the characters better if the story had been more developed. Now instead it feels like you get a quick introduction to each of the siblings, but you never really get to know them or care for them or their father.

Now, this is just my humble opinion, it's a well-loved book and perhaps it will work better for you.

 
I want to thank the publisher for providing me with a free copy through NetGalley for an honest review!
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review 2017-04-02 04:56
An Honest Read About Dying Days...
The Language of Dying - Sarah Pinborough

I was caught on by the title - The Language of Dying and then, it was the reviews about the book, especially when I read a small printed line from Neil Gaiman that says 'A beautiful story, honestly told'. It was on the fantasy section and without any thoughts I pick it up. When I started reading, I knew this book can be read less than 1/2 a day but it took me a while to finish it (I was lazy lately, my excuse? Too much mobile games). Still, this is a book that is truly honest in words we will never spoke off but we know it is there. I only have just one problem - that convenient ending that was cut-off that I did not like and it was what a let down for me that cuts of my emotions when it was stirring during my read.

 

But what is The Language of Dying means? In the beginning of the first few pages, we will be reading each chapter like part-eulogy, part essay. The main character has no name to be identified, that has a sister and 3 brothers but we will be reading the main character's perspective. Their father is dying of cancer. Each day towards the last, the bonding of the family was once a crack, now broken and unable to fix come together to his dying days. A visit each day, is a visit of dread. There are no laughter or smiles, to each of their own emotionally jarred and trying to keep the spirits up but in truth, they know it is impossible to be bond as a family. I can relate to that really, that's how I felt how true Sarah Pinborough has written, one that we do not want to speak of but its true. I remember my days when my grandfather was holding on to his family members of my father and his siblings and to his last breath, the bond is broken. This is how true this book is written. I can relate to that. Its the damage that people go through that can't be fixed where our honesty is within us but never spoken of in reality. The pain written in those pages is just is... until the ending part. While I do understand what the author is trying to say, but it just did not fixed it well for me. I just can't see that last part, those three pages, work well. That's how it got out knock the last star, otherwise it would have been a four instead of three and a 1/2.

 

It is still a good book, the end of days of someone you used to love or some part of and its the story of how we say our own eulogies in our own hearts, which spoke true here. But how it is part of a fantasy read is beyond me or maybe the bookstore as placed it at the wrong section (but I did picked it up from that section). Readable yes, because the words are nicely written and able to relate and if you like some thing that is truly meant to be said with no pretense, sympathy is the one word you can feel towards the main character of how realities bore her down and this is who she is today, which in reality is true. I would recommend to anyone whom able to consume a little sadness with pinch of depression but its a beautiful sad book that I can say if you brushed aside the ending, you might enjoy reading this book.

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review 2014-07-11 11:26
Family, madness and death by cancer.
The Language of Dying - Sarah Pinborough

Although I can appreciate the lovely writing, I found this book simple too depressing.

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review 2013-12-09 10:30
The Language of Dying by Sarah Pinborough. Review.
The Language of Dying - Sarah Pinborough

Ok I've done my best. Its not nearly enough but its all I can say. Reviewed on my blog today.

 

http://lizlovesbooks.com/lizlovesbooks/the-language-of-dying-by-sarah-pinborough-mission-impossible/

 

I really hope I can make EVERYONE read this book :)

Source: lizlovesbooks.com/lizlovesbooks/the-language-of-dying-by-sarah-pinborough-mission-impossible
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