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text 2018-01-22 12:02
#Promotional_Post & Excerpt - The Atlantis Twins (Mermaid Curse #1) by M.S. Kaminsky
The Atlantis Twins - M.S. Kaminsky

Never trust a mermaid with a broken heart. 

 
Seventeen-year-old Marei lives on Alabaster Island, a remote tropical isle inhabited by twenty-one families. Nobody under the age of eighteen has ever left to visit the mainland. The island and its strange customs are all that Marei and her friends know.
 
For years, Marei dreaded The Binding. On that day, each teen must write his or her choice of life mate. But with childhood sweetheart drowned long ago, Marei has no boy in mind. And so she leaves her paper blank. This sets off a chain of events that ruptures the bedrock of her life and leads her to question the only home she’s ever had. 
 
She encounters a mermaid, beings thought to have gone extinct. The mermaid tells Marei to leave the island and offers to help. When a handsome teen from the mainland becomes stranded after a supply drop, Marei falls in love. Her secret plan to flee becomes an obsession. 
 
But the mermaid has a hidden agenda of her own. Now Marei must confront the shocking reality that lies beneath island life. The choices she makes threaten to upend her fate and that of her island community forever…but only if she can escape alive.
Source: archaeolibrarianologist.blogspot.de/2018/01/promotionalpost-excerpt-atlantis-twins.html
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review 2018-01-11 03:39
Orange: The Complete Collection (manga, vol. 2) by Ichigo Takano, translated by Amber Tamosaitis
orange: The Complete Collection 2 - Ichigo Takano

Warning: this manga deals with depression and suicide. You've probably already read the first volume and know that, but this volume goes into more detail and includes a lengthy section from the POV of a character up to the moment he makes his decision to commit suicide.

I enjoyed this but had some issues with it that I’m not sure I can articulate. Well, I’ll give it a shot.

Orange is only the first two thirds of this volume. The last third is an unrelated story with a completely different tone. I’ll discuss them separately in this review.

Orange:

This volume picks up right where the first one left off. Naho is still trying to save Kakeru, but now she knows she isn’t alone - literally all of her friends also received letters from their future/parallel universe selves and are also working to save him. Things have changed enough now that the letters don’t always help, although they can still provide a little bit of guidance. But will it be enough? And will Naho and her friends’ efforts really manage to save Kakeru?

One of the things that worried me about the previous volume was the possibility that Takano might be taking the story into “high school romance saves Kakeru” territory. That worry never quite went away - although Takako thought that Kakeru would be fine even if his romance with Naho didn’t work out, Suwa was so unconvinced by this that he continued to sabotage the future he knew he could have with Naho. That said, the way the ending was written indicated that it was everyone, not just Naho, who was necessary to save Kakeru. What he needed wasn’t specifically romance, but rather relationships with people who cared about him, worried about him, and thought about him enough to try to stand by him through everything, even when he actively pushed them away.

Which brings me to the thing I’ve been avoiding writing directly about: suicide. While I think Orange is very good, it feels like something that was written more for people like Naho, Suwa, Takako, Hagita, and Azu than people like Kakeru and his mother. The section from Kakeru’s POV is part of the reason why.

At one point in the volume, Takano includes a flashback to Kakeru’s POV in the original timeline -

all the things that happened to him and contributed to his depression, as well as the one horrible thing that pushed him over the edge and made him decide to commit suicide. It was a very effective bit of storytelling, setting up a sort of final countdown and showing readers the things that Naho and the others didn’t know about but would somehow have to overcome in order to save Kakeru. And as someone who grew up with a mother who was depressed and who worried about contributing to that depression, I can say that Kakeru’s POV felt painfully real.

(spoiler show)


I probably wouldn’t recommend this series to someone who was dealing with depression and/or suicidal feelings unless they had someone they could go to that they felt comfortable talking to. The ending

was intended to be a happy and hopeful one, with Naho and the others accomplishing what they set out to do and determined to keep helping Kakeru even past the point where their letters could guide them. However, all I could think was that, despite everything they knew and all their daily efforts, they still only barely managed to keep him from killing himself. There was, for me, something deeply horrifying about that. And after all that, Kakeru’s reaction to what Naho and everyone else told him felt kind of...understated?

(spoiler show)



When I first started this series, I said that it could maybe be considered science fiction. After reading this volume, I take that back: it definitely isn’t science fiction, despite its occasional passages about parallel universes. Takano’s explanation for how Naho and her friends managed to send their letters back in time and start a parallel universe where Kakeru doesn’t die was absolutely ridiculous. Rather than coming up with some kind of brilliant plan to save Kakeru, they

literally threw their letters into the ocean and those letters somehow made their way into a black hole (or something similar). The letters then somehow all ended up in just the right time and place.

(spoiler show)


Haruiro Astronaut:

Chiki and Mami are identical twins. Mami’s the cute one that guys are always asking out. Since she can never bring herself to say “no” to any of them, even if she isn’t interested in them, Chiki always ends up being the one to break up with them for Mami. And then they ask her out because they view the twins as interchangeable. Chiki wants to find someone who sees her for who she is, rather than as an acceptable substitute for Mami, and who wants to be with her.

Mami introduces Chiki to Yui, a hot new guy in her class, and Chiki falls head over heels in love. Unfortunately for her, he’s interested in Mami. As if the situation weren’t already painful enough, Mami starts to fall for him too. So where does that leave Chiki?

This one’s light and fluffy tone was a welcome change after finishing Orange. The worst thing the characters had to worry about was whether the person they liked happened to like someone else.

This story had not one, but two love triangles: the one mentioned in my summary, involving Chiki, Mami, and Yui, and one involving Chiki, Yui’s best friend, and a guy who initially says he’s interested in Mami. To my surprise, I actually kind of liked these love triangles. Although they both had aspects that were painful for the characters, neither one got to the point of truly hurting anybody and wrecking friendships. I’m still not sure how I feel about the final pairings, but the fact that everyone could still talk to each other and have fun together after everything was said and done was really refreshing.

(And I wonder, am I the only one who looked at that last page and had a sudden vision of Chiki, Tatsuaki, and Natsuki all going on a date together? Natsuki would quietly and happily soak up the atmosphere, Tatsuaki would be overly loud in a failed effort to hide his nervousness, and Chiki would blush and laugh.)

 

Rating Note:

 

If this volume had included the end of Orange and nothing else, I might have given it 3.5 stars. Something about the way Takano wrote about Kakeru and his mother's depression didn't quite sit well with me - I don't think I've figured out exactly what bothered me, but I don't know that I care to spend more time digging into it either.

 

Haruiro Astronaut really was a breath of fresh air and managed to nudge my rating up to 4 stars, which is a bit funny considering that I probably wouldn't have given it that rating if I'd read it on its own.

 

(Original review posted on A Library Girl's Familiar Diversions.)

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review 2017-12-30 00:00
Pregnant with His Royal Twins
Pregnant with His Royal Twins - Louisa Heaton The world can be a cruel place. Freya is learning to cope with the hand life dealt her. What was once a beautiful, trusting soul, has become a reclusive creature of the night. One traumatic event broke her trusting heart and left her changed forever. With no warning she became a woman with scars. The fearless girl became a broken woman. One night changes all that. She meets a sexy stranger at a costume party and finds the courage to take a risk. Boy is she in for the surprise of her life. Pregnant with his Royal Twins is a courageous tale of the beauty of acceptance, the power of love and the ability to hope. Wrapped inside an unusual fairytale fantasy that makes it no less beautiful, but even more powerful.
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review 2017-11-07 08:00
The Twins
The Twins - Tessa de Loo

~Short English Review Below~

 

Sommige boeken moet je gelezen hebben. En dan heb je ook nog een literatuurlijst die je moet vullen. Ik had de film al verschillende keren gezien (zowel thuis als op school) en daarom moest ik meteen aan dit boek denken. Bovendien had ik al veel positieve verhalen over De Tweeling van Tessa de Loo gelezen.

Twee vrouwen, die zussen blijken te zijn, ontmoeten zich voor het eerst in vijftig jaar weer in het Belgische kuuroord Spa. Toen ze klein waren zijn ze uitelkaar gehaald en Lotte kwam bij socialistische Nederlanders, Anna kwam terecht in een primitief boerendorpje. Dit allemaal aan het eind van de jaren 20 van de vorige eeuw. Zoals te verwachten valt, groeien zij totaal anders op, en beleven zij de tweede wereld oorlog helemaal anders. In Spa nu vertellen zij elkaar hun levensverhaal en de keuzes die zij maakten.

Het boek is inderdaad indrukwekkend, al waren er geen grote verrassingen, aangezien ik de film al gezien had. Het boek is beter dan de film in mijn ogen, al is het absoluut geen slechte verfilming. De schrijfstijl is mooi, alleen had het tempo van het verhaal voor mij af en toe iets hoger mogen liggen (waarschijnlijk omdat het meestal hoger ligt), maar dat was geen groot probleem verder. Het verhaal wordt goed uitgewerkt, en in mijn ogen is er genoeg ruimte voor het verhaal van de zussen. De verschillen worden goed neergelegd, en het is ook weer eens een kijkje in het leven van 'normale' Duitsers tijdens de WOII. Het klopt, dit zou een van die boeken moeten zijn die je gelezen moet hebben.

 

~~~~

 

The Twins is a story following two sisters who've had quite radically different lives after they are taken apart when their father dies. They have not seen each other for fifty years. Can it still be possible to reconcile before it's too late?

 

I thought this was a very interesting novel. I read it for my Dutch class. The writing is nice, only the pacing sometimes is a tad slow. I'm glad I read it.

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review 2017-11-03 20:47
Clean Western Romance
Twins for the Cowboy (Triple C Cowboys) ... Twins for the Cowboy (Triple C Cowboys) (Volume 1) - Linda Goodnight

Twins For The Cowboy by Linda Goodnight is a clean western romance.  Ms Goodnight has supplied us with a well-written book and gets an A+ from me for her amazing characters.  Whitney is the single mom of twins and has been left a ranch full of mini animals.  Nate is her new neighbor that is helping her learn how to care for her animals.  There is plenty of drama, suspense, humor and just a touch of spice to keep readers engaged in this story.  This book is safe for any age.  I enjoyed Twins For The Cowboy and would gladly read more from Linda Goodnight in the future.  Twins For The Cowboy is book 1 of the Triple C Cowboys Series but can be read as a standalone.  This is a complete book, not a cliff-hanger.

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