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review 2017-07-11 14:07
The Time Machine and Other Stories ★★★☆☆
The Time Machine and Other Stories: Library Edition - H.G. Wells,Ralph Cosham

I haven’t read HG Wells since I received a collection of his stories for my 16th birthday. Of course, what I mostly remembered was The Time Machine, and being fascinated by the Eloi and Morlocks but bored by the rest of it. This particular edition is an audio collection of 10 stories of various quality, including The Time Machine. I expected that my experience with TTM would be entirely different as an adult, but was surprised to find that once again, the section following the encounter with the Eloi and Morlocks was a snoozefest, this time with a little eyeroll over the giant crab things. The difference is that I felt a little sorry for the Morlocks this time around, rather than sharing the narrator’s visceral disgust. I was much more interested in the author’s theories regarding the evolutionary outcome of the current (late 1800s Britain) political, social, and economic climate. I wonder why it never occurred to him that the oppressed industrial workers would revolt and take over as the balance of power shifted with the ruling class becoming increasingly weak and ineffectual with indolence and soft living?

 

The remainder of the short stories were mostly entertaining. Standouts were The Country of the Blind, The Man Who Could Work Miracles, and The Flowering of the Strange Orchid. The Cone was satisfactorily gory.

 

Stories in this collection:

  1. The Time Machine
  2. The Country of the Blind
  3. The Diamond Maker
  4. The Man Who Could Work Miracles
  5. Aepyornis Island
  6. The Flowering of the Strange Orchid
  7. The Cone
  8. The Purple Pileus
  9. The Truth About Pyecraft
  10. The Door in the Wall

 

Audiobook, borrowed from my public library. This is the first time I’ve borrowed a book in the playaway format, and I didn’t like it. For one thing, I had to supply my own battery. For another, the rudimentary playing controls made navigating through the short stories somewhat difficult. And lastly, I’m just plain old spoiled by reading apps on my phone, and appalled by how quickly technology becomes obsolete. It wasn’t that long ago that we would have been delighted by an audio coming already loaded in a (sort of) portable digital format, rather than having to keep inserting the CDs into our heavy Sony Walkman/Discman.

 

Ralph Cosham provides a very good performance. His somehow old-fashioned stylings really fit the stories.

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review 2017-05-12 02:23
The Time Machine
The Time Machine - H.G. Wells

This was better than The War of the Worlds. H.G. Wells kept it short this time, so no overly long descriptions, though he's still allergic to giving his main characters names. The science is ridiculous, of course, but once you get past that this is a fun little story about the future of mankind, but there's not much else here than that. 

 

I did see the Guy Pearce movie (OMG has that been 15 years ago already?!) and yikes, I can see why people who read and loved this novella hated the movie. It's not really anything like the story at all. Let me just express my appreciation that H.G. Wells realized that the ability to time travel is motivation enough for an inventor to build a time machine - no fridging of a girlfriend necessary. Take note, Hollywood: STOP FRIDGING WOMEN!

 

I will leave you will this thought:

 

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review 2017-05-01 09:28
#29 - The Time Machine by H.G. Wells
The Time Machine - Greg Bear,H.G. Wells

The Time Machine is more an analysis of the society than it is a novel. The world in which the Time Traveler landed is quite weird and a bit crazy. I love how the Time Traveler is trying to explain everything he sees and how this society is organized. When he discovered how these "people" really live, he is kind of surprised and a bit scared. It was surprising to see that this author could think of this as a plausible future (well, not that much in a sense). Our interpretation of the future is really different from H.G. Wells' one. Because our fears are different than they were during his time, because we know how we are screwing up and what it may cause in the future.

 

It is a short book but not an easy one. The plot is quite simple to follow, but I guess I would have to read it at least 10 times to get everything he is trying to say.

 

Really enjoyed it, it was interesting.

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text 2017-04-20 14:12
The Time Machine - Greg Bear,H.G. Wells SHREYA KHUBBER MIND TREE The time machine is a social allegory penned down by H.G Wells. the plot of the story is based in the year 802701 A.D. It is amazing to read the imaginative description of future that is given by the author through a character referred to throughout as the Time Traveller. It conveys a moral virtue that we all have forgotten-we are nature and in nature everyone has a part to play. If we don't do it ourself we do not become the stakeholders of the right to complain if some one else overpowers us.
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review 2017-04-05 14:01
Reconciled with Wells
The Time Machine - H.G. Wells

I was plesantly surprised. I did not enjoy War of the Worlds when I was a teen (I was bored to tears, actually), but I might have to revisit it given how much I liked this one.

 

It was bittersweet and evocative. Hamy in the social commentary too, but on those I still liked one passage:

 

And here I must admit that I learned very little of drains and bells and modes of conveyance, and the like conveniences, during my time in this real future. In some of these visions of Utopias and coming times which I have read, there is a vast amount of detail about building, and social arrangements, and so forth. But while such details are easy enough to obtain when the whole world is contained in one's imagination, they are altogether inaccessible to a real traveller amid such realities as I found here. Conceive the tale of London which a negro, fresh from Central Africa, would take back to his tribe!

 

 

I liked this idea of the unfathomability of far future. And out of it's gruesome context, and despite the MC rejection, this comment:

 

Man had been content to live in ease and delight upon the labours of his fellow-man, had taken Necessity as his watchword and excuse, and in the fullness of time Necessity had come home to him.>

 

There is a wealth of vengefulness there. A race's history measure of it. And pity, defeat, sadness.

 

For a short read, it got me thinking. A beautiful picture that gets pretty grim when you start digging. Talk about parallel between theme and content.

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