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review 2018-01-22 12:58
The Irresistible Liar
An Unnatural Vice (Sins of the Cities) - KJ Charles

Now that's more like it!

I admit the first book from the series An Unseen Attraction was not my favorite of K.J Charles' . 
But I loved that one. 

Nathaniel had me interested in him from the very first time he appeared. And Justin- he's the type of character that I know if I met in real life, I 'd fall head over hills for him. 

I loved the angst, their dialogues, their arguing and love making/ although I am not sure love- making is strong enough to describe their super hot and angry sex/ .
I liked how despite how totally different their values were, they found their way towards each other, and at the same time stayed true to what they are. 

I am already looking forward to the last book of the series and I really need to know more about my other favorite character of the series.

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review 2018-01-19 16:47
Didn't get the word play of the title until I was writing out my notes
The Importance of Being Earnest: A Trivial Comedy for Serious People - Oscar Wilde

After what feels like a millennium, I have read The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde and I totally get the hype now. Oscar Wilde's play focuses on two men who independently of the other have invented alternate personas that allow them to cut loose without (hopefully) any repercussions. One of the men has created Ernest who is by all rights a scoundrel and his creator has finally decided to do away with him so that he can settle down and get married. The problem is that his friend (the other deceitful man) has decided to take on the mantle of Ernest so that he can win the heart of a girl that he's just met. (I recommend reading this in one sitting because otherwise you're liable to get confused.) Wilde uses word play and absolutely ridiculous circumstances to discuss the folly of youth and poke fun at the whims and fancies of people who believe they are really truly in love even if they don't truly know the other person. For instance, the two women of the play are determined that they will only marry someone named Ernest but as it turns out no one is named Ernest there is a bit of a kerfuffle. After all is said and done, no one comes out on top and everyone is depicted as foolish and unimpressive. It was thoroughly amusing and I guess now I'll have to see the movie that was based on it. :-P If you haven't read it yourself and you'd like a quick, fun read this will do just the trick. 9/10

 

And yes the title of this post is true. I was staring at the book's title and then it hit me: "Oh because it's about two men proclaiming to be Ernest and they do it will all earnestness."  *facepalm* 

 

What's Up Next: The Goldfish Boy by Lisa Thompson

 

What I'm Currently Reading: The Portable Nineteenth-Century African American Women Writers

 

Source: readingfortheheckofit.blogspot.com
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review 2017-02-08 14:25
Dirty Old London: The Victorian Fight Against Filth - Lee Jackson

If you are fastidious, don't like filth or stench, then you would have not wanted to live in Victorian times as there was plenty of both and even if you were wealthy it was no protection as there was no avoiding either! This is a really well researched book, filled with everything you could possibly want to know about this subject. There was a lot of fascinating information about grime, soot, toilets, housing, washing clothes and bodies etc, but there was also a lot about this or that committee, so and so said/did this, somebody else did that which wasn't nearly so interesting and I ended up skim reading these sections. The photos don't work too well on a kindle which is a shame. It is still worth reading this title to get a great insight as to how our forebears lived.

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text 2016-01-21 06:54
Holy Bag of Books Batman! (TBR Thursday, January 21, Part 1)
The Victorian City: Everyday Life in Dickens' London - Judith Flanders
The Counterfeit Heiress - Tasha Alexander
The Cat Sitter's Nine Lives: A Mystery - Blaize Clement,John Clement
Miss Dimple Picks a Peck of Trouble - Mignon F. Ballard
Miss Dimple Rallies to the Cause - Mignon F. Ballard
An Inquiry Into Love and Death - Simone St. James
Austenland - Shannon Hale
Horologicon - Mark Forsyth
The Fangirl's Guide to the Galaxy: A Lexicon of Life Hacks for the Modern Lady Geek - Sam Maggs
Marked Fur Murder (A Whiskey Tango Foxtrot Mystery) - Dixie Lyle

So I came home to find this waiting for me on Tuesday:

 

My bookoutlet.com order arrived!  From the USA via Belgium if the bag and tag are to be believed.  In addition to the new-to-me goodies listed above, I got three more: 2 Illona Andrews books I've read but don't own (Magic Bites and Magic Bleeds), and an upgrade from ebook to hardback of Hunting Ground by Patricia Briggs.

 

None of the books were more than $3 each, which is good, because there's no way I could afford the shipping costs otherwise - especially with the side jaunt to Belgium it took.  

 

 

Is anything better than coming home to a load of new books just waiting for you?  Well, yes, there are a few things better, but precious few. 

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text 2016-01-02 19:29
2015 Roundup
We Two: Victoria and Albert: Rulers, Partners, Rivals - Gillian Gill
Dawn of the Belle Epoque: The Paris of Monet, Zola, Bernhardt, Eiffel, Debussy, Clemenceau, and Their Friends - Mary McAuliffe
The Victorian City: Everyday Life in Dickens' London - Judith Flanders
Uprooted - Naomi Novik
The Martian - Andy Weir
Embers - Sándor Márai,Carol Brown Janeway
The Rhetoric of Death - Judith Rock
Murder as a Fine Art - David Morrell
The Invisible Library - Genevieve Cogman
The Alchemist's Daughter - Mary Lawrence

Well, I had a good reading year in 2015 - I beat my original goal of 75 in October, and finished with 95 or so books read.  And most of them were good reads, some very good indeed. 

 

Best books I read this year: We Two, a joint biography of Victoria and Albert, by Gillian Gill; Dawn of the Belle Epoque, a cultural history of Paris, 1870-1900, by Mary McAuliffe; The Victorian City, a study of Dickens' London, by Judith Flanders; Uprooted, an Eastern European fantasy novel by Naomi Novik; and The Martian, by Andy Weir.

 

Weirdest reads: Embers, by Sandor Marai.  (Beautiful writing, but a strange, strange "plot.")  The Awakening of Miss Prim, by Natalia Fenollera. 

 

Best author discovery: Judith Rock, who writes historical mysteries set in the Paris of Louis XIV.  Her detective is a Jesuit priest, whose duties are teaching rhetoric and ballet to the aristocratic sons of France.  There are only four volumes that I know of in the series; the first is The Rhetoric of Death.

 

Weakest reads: Murder as a Fine Art, by David Morrell.  (The main character is well developed; unfortunately no one else is, and the plot is highly melodramatic.)  The Invisible Library, by Genevieve Cogman.  (Too many plot elements stuffed, with none done full justice, into one short novel.)  The Alchemist's Daughter, by Mary Lawrence.  (A historical mystery with ahistorical tea, and a heroine I didn't either like or care about.)  Medium Dead, by Alexandra Gladstone.  (Victorian lady doctor, whom all including Queen Victoria accept, and her boyfriend, the earl whose hobby is breaking and entering combined with lock-picking, I just couldn't buy.)

 

But all in all, a very good year!  I hope 2016 is as good.

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