logo
Wrong email address or username
Wrong email address or username
Incorrect verification code
back to top
Search tags: W.H.-Smith
Load new posts () and activity
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-08-12 16:09
Willing Suspension of Disbelief: “The First Lensman” by E. E. Doc Smith
First Lensman (The Lensman Series) - Jack Gaughan,E.E. "Doc" Smith

"Nobody does anything for nothing. Altruism is beautiful in theory, but it has never been known to work in practice."


In “The First Lensman” by E. E. Doc Smith


In many or most written SF, certainly in SF films, the canny audience member engages in a willing suspension of disbelief. The question for me often comes down to just a couple considerations--is it a bridge too far, just too many stupidities of too gross a scale for me to be able to buy-in? And am I enjoying myself on other levels--is it just so fun or cool or exciting, or are the characters and story just so damned compelling, that I can't help but have a good time? So, if I'm not offended by the stupidity, and the work in question as a narrative, then I'm happily able to suspend my disbelief and enjoy it. 

Ok. it's only SF but..

 

 

If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review 2018-08-11 17:44
Realistic Sounding Nonsense: "Triplanetary" E.E. "Doc" Smith
Triplanetary - E.E. "Doc" Smith


"Immediately before the Coalescence began there was one,and only one, planetary solar system in the Second Galaxy; and, until the advent of Eddore, the Second Galaxy was entirely devoid of intelligent life"

In "Triplanetary" by E. E. "Doc" Smith


There are only three real approaches to physics in SF:

1. Absolute hard core real physics with speculative aspects;
2. Realistic sounding nonsense;
3. Unrealistic sounding nonsense.

 

(my own English edition bought in 1999)


I am personally a fan of approach 2. This gave us stuff like "Triplanetary", "First Lensman", etc.

In response to those suggesting that dissecting the science in SF novels is redundant and possibly silly, I would argue for a dichotomy. 

If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.

Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
url 2018-08-08 00:53
$2.99 Sale from Publisher Orbit (SF/F genre imprint of Hachette Book Group)
Jade City - Fonda Lee
Soul of the World - David Mealing
The Court of Broken Knives - Anna Smith Spark
The Fifth Ward: First Watch - Dale Lucas
Strange Practice - Vivian Shaw
The Tethered Mage - Melissa Caruso-Scott
Age of Assassins - R.J. Barker
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
review SPOILER ALERT! 2018-08-05 21:22
Solitary by Alexander Gordon Smith
Escape from Furnace 2: Solitary - Alexander Gordon Smith

Solitary by Alexander Gordon Smith
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Delving further into the bowels of Furnace Penitentiary, Alex Sawyer desperately tries to hold onto his fleeting sanity. After a failed attempt to escape the underground horrors, being thrown into solitary confinement is a fate worse than death. A hole in the rocky earth becomes his coffin, yet it won't save him from what roams the corridors, in search of warm flesh to eat.

(WARNING: This review contains minor spoilers.)

With this second installment I desperately tried to overcome my primary issue with the series - the suspension of disbelief that it relies so heavily upon. Unfortunately I just can’t get behind the all important plot point of how this prison even exists; world building has been pretty unremarkable in that regard. I mean, how could parents just be okay with never seeing their teenage children ever again, no matter what crimes they’ve apparently committed? I digress. I promised myself this wouldn’t be a rant-review, because in actuality, I enjoy the struggles of Alex quite a bit. Smith adds such raw emotion to the dire situation, and good, descriptive writing I can appreciate. Rather than Alex and his friends emerging into the light of freedom, they’re thrown into solitary confinement in this addition. Who knew general population would be greatly missed? I have to give credit where it’s due; the unpleasantness of solitary at times made my skin crawl. Despite the main protagonists being in their teenage years, little detail was left to the imagination - even their toilet habits were voiced. This is the sort of book I would have loved as a younger reader; pushing the boundaries of the young adult genre with its bleak themes. Perhaps I would have even dismissed the implausibilities in favour of enjoyment, but my mind doesn’t work that way these days.

I can’t say that Alex, as a character, developed a great deal. His way of thinking was much the same as the last - feeling helpless and doomed, followed by a sense of hope and determination. One thing in particular became very much apparent, and that’s the fact his actions wholly depend upon his companions. Without them, and I believe he’d be a very lifeless person. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing, but I am a fan of independence. I often wondered what, if anything, he would have achieved if truly without anyone. He hinted once or twice about suicide, but again I think his relationships give him his every bit of strength. Perhaps he’ll find himself all by his lonesome at some point, as his allies are dwindling in number. A new character was introduced however, and I liked Simon and what he represented.

As for the plot, it was thoroughly entertaining, even if it was a recycled escape and fail trope. By now I know that Smith favours the action-packed scenes that keep readers on their toes, and together with the turbulence of Alex’s mind, it was enough to keep me invested. I enjoyed the change of scenery, and especially the horrors of the infirmary. Questions arose about the mystery behind it all; the black substance that transforms the subjects, the overall goal of creating monsters. There’s an endless supply of prisoners, after all, so what’s the point? To build an army?

In conclusion: Even though I preferred Lockdown a bit more, this one showed no signs of the series slowing down. It’s grim and frightening at times, and I appreciate the expressive way in which the story's told. If only more information was given to properly quench my concerns.

Notable Quote:

I wondered how many voices there were living in my head, and how they could all have such different opinions.

© Red Lace 2018

Wordpress ~ Booklikes ~ Twitter

View all my reviews

Source: redlace.reviews/2018/08/05/649
Like Reblog Comment
show activity (+)
text 2018-08-03 02:56
Setting aside until in a short story mood...
Were- - Anneliese Belmond,Eliora Smith,Sarah Brand,Faith Hunter,Mike Barretta,April Steenburgh,Susan Jett,Phyllis Ames-Bey,Gini Koch,Seanan McGuire,Elizabeth Sarah Kite,Jean Marie Ward,Danielle Ackley-McPhail,Joshua Palmatier,Patricia Bray,Katharine Kerr,David B.

I'll eventually pick this anthology back up because some favorite authors participated.

 

I'm either not in the mood for it or the stories are rather bland/meh.

 

I know myself.  If I rush ahead to read favorite authors' entries, I won't pick it back up nor finish reading it.

More posts
Your Dashboard view:
Need help?