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text 2014-03-19 06:16
Westhill House Highgate Consulting Rooms Sleep Therapy Can Change Bad Memories

Westhill House Highgate Consulting Rooms Sleep Therapy Can Change Bad Memories

 

Westhill House Highgate Consulting Rooms is located in West Hill House, a quiet building in Swain's Lane, set back from the road. Swain's Lane is one of Highgate's most charming streets. It is within 50 metres of Hampstead Heath and with easy access to bus, train and underground. Local restaurants and cafés add to the friendly, village atmosphere. We’ve had no complaints Many of our consulting rooms are rented to professional and alternative medical specialists. From holistic therapies from SE Asian countries such as Bangkok Thailand, Jakarta Indonesia and many more.

 

Sleep Therapy Can Change Bad Memories

 

Forget the psychiatrist’s couch. Your own bed could one day be a setting for psychotherapy. Targeted brain training during sleep can lessen the effects of fearful memories, according to a study published today in Nature Neuroscience. Researchers say that the technique could ultimately be used to treat psychiatric disorders, such as phobias and post-traumatic stress disorders.Today, those conditions are most commonly treated using ‘exposure therapy’, which requires patients to intentionally relive their fears. With repeated exposures in the safety of a therapist’s consulting room, patients can learn to reduce their responses to traumatic cues — suggesting that memories are being altered. But the treatment itself can be intolerably painful for some patients, especially at first. In the latest study, neuroscientist Katherina Hauner and her colleagues at the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University in Chicago, Illinois, devised a form of exposure therapy that works while people snooze.“It’s fascinating, and very promising,” says Daniela Schiller, a neuroscientist at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York. “We used to think you need awareness and conscious understanding of your emotional responses in order to change them.”

 

Instant replay

 

To create fearful memories, Hauner’s team delivered mild electric shocks to study participants as they viewed pictures of faces that were paired with a distinct odor, such as lemon or mint. People began to sweat slightly on seeing the pictures and smelling the odors, anticipating that they would get a shock.

 

Soon after the training, participants napped in the lab while the researchers monitored their brain waves with electrodes placed on their scalps. When the volunteers entered slow-wave sleep — a stage during which recent memories are replayed and reinforced — the team released one of the fear-linked odors. By administering the odor at 30-second intervals, the researchers were trying to trigger the memory of the corresponding face over and over again — this time without delivering electric shocks. Just like when they were awake, the sleeping subjects showed increased sweating when exposed to the odor, but the effect gradually subsided.

 

The reduced effect persisted after sleep. When awake, people showed diminished fear responses when exposed to the odor–face combination that had been triggered repeatedly during sleep. Activity changes in the amygdala, a region of the brain involved in emotion and fear, suggest that the treatment did not erase the fearful memory, but rather that it created new, innocuous associations with the odor–face combination. People who slept longer and received more treatment benefited most from the procedure.

 

“It’s really paradoxical,” says Jan Born, a neuroscientist at the University of Tübingen in Germany, noting that the spontaneous replay of memories during sleep is typically thought to strengthen rather than weaken learning.

 

Hauner explains that repeated activation of a single fearful memory during sleep probably works more like real exposure therapy and less like a natural replay of memories at night, in which memories are triggered haphazardly. More work is needed, she says, to determine how long the treatment lasts and whether overnight sleep might affect it.

 

As for using the technique therapeutically, Hauner notes that real traumatic memories, especially very old ones, could be much more complicated to treat than the simple scenarios engineered in the lab. “This is a very novel area,” she says. “I think the process has to be refined.”

 

http://www.consulting-rooms.co.uk/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=1&Itemid=2

http://www.consulting-rooms.co.uk/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=2&Itemid=3

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text 2014-03-18 06:36
Westhill House Highgate Consulting Rooms Holiday Stress

http://www.consulting-rooms.co.uk/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=2&Itemid=3

 

http://www.consulting-rooms.co.uk/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=8&Itemid=34

 

Westhill House Highgate Consulting Rooms is located in West Hill House, a quiet building in Swain's Lane, set back from the road.

Swain's Lane is one of Highgate's most charming streets. It is within 50 metres of Hampstead Heath and with easy access to bus, train and underground. Local restaurants and cafés add to the friendly, village atmosphere. We’ve had no complaints.

 

Many of our consulting rooms are rented to professional and alternative medical specialists.  From holistic therapies from SE Asian countries such as Bangkok Thailand, Jakarta Indonesia and many more.

 

•          Full-time receptionist and support staff

•          Purpose-built for individual and group psychotherapy

•          Architect-designed and elegantly furnished

•          All lighting and heating supplied from renewable sources

•          Soundproofed

•          Fully ventilated

•          Entryphones to all rooms

•          Waiting areas

•          Rent by hour or session

•          Daytime, evenings and weekends, 7 days a week

•          Broadband free of charge

 

"The holidays are coming and I'm filled with dread over the parties, the visitors, the baking, school plays, etc. I find myself gritting my teeth before Halloween and not breathing a sigh of relief until after the New Year. My kids get tired and whiny and misbehave, which just makes matters worse. Help!"

 

A. The holidays are filled with stress. We want to be hospitable, cheerful, and spiritually focused on Jesus, but in reality we are busy, sleep-deprived, and financially strapped. Here are some ideas you can implement to pare down the busyness of the season.

 

Have a couple's conference:

 

Begin by sitting down with your spouse before Thanksgiving and deciding which people and events are most important to your family this holiday season. As you look through the list, eliminate the less-important events.

 

Plan for family time:

 

Block out one day of each weekend in November and December to keep unscheduled. Guard these days for the good of your family. If you can't manage to block a full day each weekend, block out two half-days. Once your calendar is full, schedule any remaining "get-togethers" for January, when the calendar is more open and kids need interesting things to do.

 

Empathize with your kids:

 

If you're feeling tired, so are your kids. When they get crabby from over-stimulation, take them away from the activities and say, "I'm feeling tired. I bet you're feeling tired right now, too." Your child will probably agree.

If you can, let her take a break from the action by retreating to her room, even if you have company. If you're out and about, remind her of the next quiet time in the day and the upcoming family day during the weekend.

 

Don't host unless you want to:

 

If you have small children (7 and under), I recommend you avoid hosting a family event. Ask a parent or a sibling with older children to host, but offer to bring a dish or help with the day's cooking and cleanup. Some people feel pressured to host because they are the only Christians in the family and they want to make sure the celebrations focus on Christ.

 

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