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review 2017-09-19 04:03
Massacre Pond
Massacre Pond - Paul Doiron

Mike Bowditch gets a call from a friend who is working for a wealthy woman manning the gates of her property. She bought up a large amount of land in Maine, kicked out the people living on leased land, banned hunting and wood cutting and put up gates to keep vehicles out. She wants to turn it into a wild life refuge. The people who live in the area and make their living at the mill or feed their families by hunting don´t like her and she has been getting threatening letters and calls. Mike arrives to see what his friend is so upset about and is confronted with seven dead moose on the property, slaughtered and left to rot. Mike´s superiors try to freeze him out of the investigation to get back at him for not following orders in the past. He showed them up and solved the previous case and made them look bad. He decided to follow orders this time and try to stay out of trouble. Things get worse though and more dead moose are spotted from the air. The woman´s daughter calls him scared to death because a truck is chasing her. The violence is escalating and people want this case solved. At the same time Mike is dealing with a difficult family problem and starts thinking about quitting his job as a game warden. 

This was a great book and Paul Doiron seems to be getting better with each book. When I wasn´t reading this book I was thinking about it.

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text 2017-07-21 22:25
Go Wild!
The Extinction Club - Jeffrey Moore

This was my first experience of work by Canadian author, Jeffrey Moore and perhaps to the author's credit 'The Extinction Club" isn't easily pidgeon-holed. It's certainly thrilling, but there are also elements of brutal crime, a key character (Celeste) is a teenager, but it's not really a 'young adult' novel, at one point crumbs even seemed to be leading down the path of a ghost/monster story, but no. What does stand out is the use of the book as a brash exposé of the abject capacity of man for cruelty and the depraved abuse of wild animals, as well as their own kind. Designed to be hard-hitting, in parts the book adopts the tenor of a documentary and yet the tension builds from the classic clash of good and evil.

 

Nile Nightingale is an unlikely hero. Hiding out in the Laurentian mountains of Quebec, from a series of stateside misdemeanors and a litigious ex-partner with designs on his inheritance, the recovering alcoholic is in poor shape. However, when he rescues a discarded burlap sack from sinking into marshland, he discovers inside 14 year-old Celeste, beaten and stabbed. Both damaged by their respective experiences. Nile and Celeste contrive to rehabilitate each other and rediscover the spirit to not be cowed, but rather to find the courage to stand up for what it right.

 

For Nile especially, the adventure smacks of a chance for redemption, but brimming with challenge, the temptation to take the path of least resistance is palpable. In describing the burgeoning connection of the main characters the book is also touching and ultimately demonstrates that humankind is simultaneously capable of great virtue and altruism, which can set the species apart.

 

Thus, by casting a light on the dichotomy between the hunted and the hunters, Moore alludes to the possibility that the abuse of power is the greatest weakness of all. Still, for all the uncompromising wildlife protection zeal, Moore's inclusion of wacky cameos, such as Welshman Myles Llewellyn, at least confers a little lightness to the barbarous gloom. Bore da! 

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